United States and The Holocaust

By: Quinton, Zander, Max, Britin, & Jacek

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Main Idea

In 1937 through 1939, the American government was indecisive on helping the World Jewish Congress.

Supporting Detail

“US State Department policies made it very difficult for refugees to obtain entry visas. Despite the ongoing persecution of Jews in Germany, the State Department's attitude was influenced by the economic hardships of the Depression, which intensified grassroots anti-Semitism, isolationism, and xenophobia.”(Paragraph 1) -Max
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Supporting Detail

“On November 24, 1942, Wise held a press conference to announce that

Nazi Germany was implementing a policy to annihilate the European Jews. A few weeks

later, on December 17, the United States, Great Britain, and ten other Allied governments

issued a declaration denouncing Nazi Germany's intention to murder the Jews of Europe.”(Paragraph 2) -Zander
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Supporting Detail

“The declaration warned Nazi Germany that it would be held responsible for these crimes.” (Paragraph 2) -Quinton

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Supporting Detail

“Department officials declined to pass on the report to its intended recipient, American Jewish leader Stephen Wise, who was President of the World Jewish Congress. Despite the State Department's delay in publicizing the mass murder, that same month wise received the report via British channels.”(Paragraph 3) -Jacek
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Supporting Detail

“During the era of the Holocaust, the American press did not always publicize reports of Nazi atrocities in full or with prominent placement.”(Paragraph 4) -Britin

Question?

If you were the United States government and you received the call asking for help, what would you choose to do and why?