Influenza

By Cole Hansen

H3N2

H3N2 is the current Influenza strain that the CDC has been working on since the outbreak this year to make a vaccination. Symptoms include those of the regular flu; aching, weakness, and a fever of over 100, but this flu carries a higher risk of complications due just to how new it is, which is also why a new vaccination has not been developed yet.

Causes

How influenza is spread is fairly easy to understand. Influenza is mainly spread human to human through things like being coughed on, sneezed on, inhaling germs, or even talking, which all involve either saliva, dirty surfaces, or lots of people around you at once.

Prevention

Influenza is also pretty simple to prevent, by doing things like washing your hands regularly, getting annual injections, and stop rubbing your nose and face. This is an open door for influenza. If you do these, you should have almost nothing to worry about.

Treatments

Treatments often just include getting plenty of rest and drinking fluids often. Antivirals can also be prescribed by your doctor for the virus; such as the major ones: Zanamivir and Oseltamivir, both of which include side affects such as vomiting, nausea, and weakness. Zanamivir itself should not be used if you have lung complications (it is inhaled) and Oseltamivir has been associated with depression and delirium in teens using it. This should only be used in a healthy mental states. Note that antivirals will not get rid of your virus, but shorten it's span only if you take it within a day of showing symptoms.

1918

The first wave of influenza hit in March where a military camp in Kansas reported "Influenza of a severe type" upon about 15 men. Soon enough the virus had spread like wildfire across the US, going everywhere you could see. The Virus had soon been taken to western Europe in the middle of WWI, absolutely destroying countries, quarantines went around countries, putting the world into panic at how many deaths there were. Nurses were sent, people wore gauze masks and tried to make an injection that eventually failed, they tried everything to get rid of it, but nothing did. By the end of the war 9 million people were killed. This number is dwarfed by the 50 million people who were killed by the virus. Soon enough in 1919, the virus slowly started disappearing, giving them time to prepare for any next wave to happen...
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Sources

Pictures

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  • Swine Influenza. Digital image. Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Wikepedia. Web. 18 Dec. 2014.
  • Tamiflu. Digital image. Liverpool Echo. Web. 18 Dec. 2014.
  • Influenza 1918. Digital image. Thinking Sideways Podcast. Web. 19 Dec. 2014.

Text


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