Teen Obesity

Period 1 Digital Literacy By Alex Ewell

Intro

Some teens feel that the only option to stop being obese is to get surgery. Teen obesity is a growing epidemic. The following will prove that teens should not use surgery to stop being obese: teens have overly high expectations with surgery, teens do not realize the hardships, or that the FDA has only considered allowing it for teens, thus proving that they should not use surgery as a solution to obesity. I hope you unruly teens will not try to use these procedures, because of your overly high expectations.

Teens have overly high expectations

To begin with, some teens have to high expectations. Success stories like those of celebrities such as Al Roker and Star Jones may make bariatric surgery look easy. However it's not. In fact, doctors are so concerned that teens may have unrealistic expectations that they require extensive pre-surgery evaluation and lifestyle changes to ensure that teens understand the serious risks, are dedicated to overhauling their health, and don't take the procedure lightly. Bariatric surgery is not for those who are slightly overweight.



The unrealized hardships

Next off, we have the hardships of these types of surgery that teens do not realize. There are still a considerable number of surgical complications in the study -- one in three patients’ required follow-up surgeries. “These teens are expected to keep the band for 60-plus years," says Dr. Jonathan Schoen, bariatric surgeon at the University of Colorado Hospital. He says the safety of the surgery is "something entirely unproven”. There is no doubt that bariatric surgery has a very important role in adolescent morbid obesity. However, which operation will provide the best and longest-term outcome is still a matter of much debate."



The FDA has only considered allowing these procedures for teens

Finally, I bring you that The FDA has only considered allowing teens to use this procedure. Although there is no consensus on national guidelines for bariatric surgery for adolescents, doctors generally follow the same national guidelines for their (much) older adults patients: The patient is recommended to have a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher (for example, someone 5'4" would have to weigh at least 233 pounds to qualify), or a BMI of 35 (a weight of 204 for someone 5'4") or greater with serious obesity-related health problems, such as type 2 diabetes. Though the FDA is considering broadening its standards on gastric banding to include teens aged 14 to 17, the procedure is currently approved only for adults. Doing the operation on teens is not prohibited, but it is considered off-label use -- and it is hotly debated among doctors.

Outro

Thus, the previously mentioned proves that that teens have overly high expectations with surgery, teens do not realize the hardships, or that the FDA has only considered allowing it for teens, thus proving that they should not use surgery as a solution to obesity. As stated these procedures are not for teens, and thus teens should not use them. This is why I find you should not use these procedures.