Ida Tarbell

Lila Kane

How it all started..

Ida Minerva Tarbell, born in 1857,the first child of Franklin Sumner and Elizabeth McCullough Tarbell, was a woman far ahead of her time. She lived during a period of our history when few opportunities were open to women other than teaching, nursing, and homemaking. She, set standards professionals try to eluminate. Ida, was born November 5, 1857 in the log home of her maternal grandfather, Walter Raleigh McCullough. His farm was located in Hatch Hollow, near Wattsburg in northwest Pennsylvania.
Big image

Highlightss

After years of research, Ida Tarbell produced a detailed analysis of the most perfect of all monopolies, Standard Oil. Appearing in nineteen installments in McClure's Magazine, beginning in November of 1902, it was subsequently published as a two-volume book in 1904. She had hoped it would be received as a historical study; instead, to her dismay, she was labeled a "muckraker" by President Theodore Roosevelt. President Roosevelt, while engaged in a "trust-busting" campaign, called a number of authors including Ida Tarbell, Frank Norris, and Upton Sinclair "muckrakers" and social reformers because her point of view was primarily that of a historian-a journalist after documented facts, not the advocate of a cause or a reformer. According to some, The History of the Standard Oil Company is, to this day, the best documented history of its kind ever written. Influenced by Ida Tarbell's work, anti-trust laws of the states and the federal government, decisions of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, and investigations by Congress, the Supreme Court of the United States handed down a decision on May 1911 that the Standard Oil Trust be dissolved in the next six months.

Highlights cont.

Ida Tarbell helped transform journalism by introducing what is called today investigative journalism. Through her achievements she not only helped to expand the role of the newspaper in modern society and stimulate the Progressive reform movement, but she also became a role model for women wishing to become professional journalists. In 1922, The New York Times named her one of the "Twelve Greatest American Women." It was journalism like hers that inspired Americans of the early twentieth century to seek reform in our government, in our economic structures, and in our urban areas. Ida was not only a writer and biographer, she helped open the door to other women seeking careers in journalism and, later, in broadcasting.

QUIZ!

  1. What was one of the books Tarbell wrote?

a.) Twelve Greatest Women

b.) Life During the Oil Industry

c.) The History of the Standard Oil Company


2. What was Tarbell known for?

a.) A biographer of Abraham Lincoln

b.) A historian of the oil industry

c.) Neither

d.) Both


3. How did Ida help transform or advance journalism?

a.) She introduced investigative journalism

b.) She helped advance the technology in journalism

c.) She did not help or advance journalism

ANSWERSSS!

  1. What was one of the books Tarbell wrote?

a.) Twelve Greatest Women

b.) Life During the Oil Industry

c.) The History of the Standard Oil Company


2. What was Tarbell known for?

a.) A biographer of Abraham Lincoln

b.) A historian of the oil industry

c.) Neither

d.) Both


3. How did Ida help transform or advance journalism?

a.) She introduced investigative journalism

b.) She helped advance the technology in journalism

c.) She did not help or advance journalism

Elijah Parish Lovejoy

Shot to death Nov. 7, 1837 two days before his 35th birthday, as he fought to protect one of his newspaper’s newly delivered presses from a pro-slavery mob, mobs had previously destroyed three other presses. He was a Presbyterian minister and a fervent abolitionist who was scorned by a pro-slavery mob even on the way to his grave. He was murdered by pro-slavery mob in Alton, Illinois, during their attack on his warehouse to destroy his press and abolitionist materials. An abolitionist newspaper, the Emancipator Extra, praised him in poetry and prose as "liberty's martyr." Today, Colby College gives a press freedom award in his name.