Hammurabi's Code- Is it just?

Alex Krysiuk

Let's dive into the facts ...

Is it just? I most certainly don't think so, although some laws may be fair, others can be completely harsh and outrageous. Consider law 48: ''If a man has borrowed money to plant his fields and a storm has flooded his field or carried away the crop ... in that year he does not have to pay his creditor.'' That specific law is completely unfair to creditors, here's more examples:

Law 209 ...

''If a man strikes the daughter of a free man and causes her to lose the fruit of her womb, he shall pay 10 shekals of silver.'' Where as if the victim is a slave, the culprit only has to pay 2 shekals of silver. Seriously Hammurabi? People don't chose to be slaves, the same crime is still committed, so why is the punnishment one-fifth the other one?

Law 218 ...

"If a surgeon has operated with a bronze lancet on a free man for a serious injury, and has caused his death ... his hands shall be cut off." He was trying to save the man's life. Why did he get punished for it?

Conclusion ...

He claims to help the weak. He claims to protect all. Yet, from what I've seen , Hammurabi's Code does none of these things. No justice here.

COMPLETELY UNFAIR