The Reds Tale

January 5, 2017

From the Desk of Mr. Roote

I recently overheard a phone conversation between Allyson and our doctor. Prompting the call was a host of issues involving our daughter Ava. She had spiked a fever, was complaining of a sore throat, had become very lethargic etc. etc. After Allyson gave a line by line description of her observations, the doctor suggested Ava come in for a throat culture. Catching my attention was the prescription of an antibiotic to be administered "in the meantime" or until the throat culture revealed if strep was present or not.


I presume that a combination of Allyson's thorough description of Ava's symptoms along with the doctors understanding of a strep profile led to the prescription. Consider for a moment the thinking going into prescribing an antibiotic before a positive test for a bacterial infection. Now consider how this approach may be useful to you as an educator.


Below is a list of students (I have omitted the names) scoring between a 50% and 64% on one or more of the "big five" June 2016 Regents assessments:


  • 50 Living Env.
  • 50 Living Env.
  • 50 Living Env.
  • 50 Global History and Geography
  • 51 English Common Core
  • 51 English Common Core
  • 51 English Common Core
  • 51 Living Env.
  • 51 Global History and Geography
  • 51 Global History and Geography
  • 51 Algebra I
  • 51 Algebra I
  • 51 Algebra I
  • 52 Living Env.
  • 52 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 52 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 52 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 52 Global History and Geography
  • 52 Global History and Geography
  • 53 Algebra I
  • 53 Algebra I
  • 53 Algebra I
  • 53 Algebra I
  • 54 Living Env.
  • 54 Living Env.
  • 54 Living Env.
  • 54 Global History and Geography
  • 54 Global History and Geography
  • 55 Living Env.
  • 55 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 55 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 55 Global History and Geography
  • 55 Global History and Geography
  • 55 Algebra I
  • 55 Algebra I
  • 55 Algebra I
  • 55 Algebra I
  • 56 Living Env.
  • 56 Global History and Geography
  • 56 Global History and Geography
  • 56 Global History and Geography
  • 56 Global History and Geography
  • 57 English Common Core
  • 57 Living Env.
  • 57 Living Env.
  • 57 Living Env.
  • 57 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 57 Algebra I
  • 58 Global History and Geography
  • 59 Living Env.
  • 59 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 59 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 59 Global History and Geography
  • 60 English Common Core
  • 60 English Common Core
  • 60 Global History and Geography
  • 60 Algebra I
  • 60 Algebra I
  • 60 Algebra I
  • 60 Algebra I
  • 60 Algebra I
  • 61 Living Env.
  • 61 Global History and Geography
  • 61 Global History and Geography
  • 61 Algebra I
  • 61 Algebra I
  • 61 Algebra I
  • 61 Algebra I
  • 61 Algebra I
  • 61 Algebra I
  • 61 Algebra I
  • 62 English Common Core
  • 62 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 62 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 62 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 62 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 63 Living Env.
  • 63 U.S. History and Gvt.
  • 63 Algebra I
  • 63 Algebra I
  • 64 Living Env.
  • 64 Living Env.
  • 64 Global History and Geography
  • 64 Global History and Geography
  • 64 Global History and Geography
  • 64 Global History and Geography
  • 64 Global History and Geography
  • 64 Algebra I
  • 64 Algebra I


Lets head back to the doctors office. Ava fit a profile for strep. Listed above are 89 students that fit a profile. Did we do enough in January of 2016 to prevent their subsequent failure on their NYS Regents in June 2016? I would like you to reflect on you major assessments from last year, particularly the names of students scoring marginally, so you can begin to consider how their profile could impact your decision making with a current student that fits a similar profile. As you think about a prescription to prevent failure consider (1) absenteeism (2) willful behaviors such as I can do homework but don't because I am lazy vs. skill deficits that may include I don't understand the work (3) how does the student do on content they struggle with after it is spiraled back into the course (4) is the student extending their school day (5) how does the student practice/prepare?


Consider for a minute the impact if we could collectively reach 1/3 of those 89 students that "bulge" our remediation rates and subsequently effect our efforts with kids trying to achieve the first time around as opposed to the second, third, etc.

From the Desk of Mr. Wagner

As I review the data from the first three months of the 16/17 school year, it appears that the number of disciplinary referrals has decreased from last year from 712 to 575 referrals (comparing September – November). I believe that some of our success is due to some changes in our freshmen intervention model as we are down from 307 to 223 behavioral incidents. In addition, we using some aggressive interventions to support some of our most challenging students. It is great to see this progress, but I am regularly thinking about strategies to reduce negative behaviors in the classroom that interrupt instruction. Assuming that those 575 incidents interrupted the instruction of at least one student, there is obviously still work to be done. Many of the class disruptions that result in removal from the classroom or a disciplinary referral begin with the student trying to engage their classmates in an undesirable behavior that escalates when addressed by the teacher. It can be a challenge when attempting to address a student who seems to want to engage in an argument to escalate the situation. Therefore, it is important to continue to develop effective strategies to avoid further disruption. The article, Avoiding Power Struggles with Students has some dos and don’ts you can add to your tool box to help you when behavior issues occur in your class. The three sections that stood out to me were: 1) try to understand the student’s background and home life, 2) make it a teaching moment, and 3) react in a way that allows the student to save face.

Mash Up

I thought you would appreciate a peek at a recent graduates participation in the opening of a Sabres game. Trey and I recently spoke about his experiences in the Army so far. He was very proud to share that he currently has eight solo jumps from planes/helicopters under his belt.


Because we can all share in an effort to recruit qualified staff here is some good news to bolster our marketing efforts. Effective January 5, we raise our teacher sub rates to the following:


  • Retired: $105
  • Certified: $95
  • Uncertified: $85

Social Emotional Learning and the Plan for Excellence

We are now live with the Social Emotional Learning tab on the NHS webpage. Standby for content updates.


The most beautiful schools.

Calendar Share

Tuesday, January 3 from 2:30-3:00 pm in cafeteria. Staff Meeting. Contact: T Roote.


Saturday, January 7 at 7:00 pm in our auditorium. Winter Jazz Concert featuring High School Jazz & Vocal Jazz Ensemble. Contact: K Flock or R Humphrey.


By 3:00 pm on January 10, February 14, March 22 and May 2. ↓65 Infinite Campus Grade Reports. Contact: T Roote.


Friday, May 12 at NRW. Special Olympics.

The Newark High School Mission, Vision and Values

The Newark High School Mission: We are a school community with deeply held hometown pride, committed to readying young people to be life-long learners with experiences aimed at continuously motivating us to hone our skills in the complex tasks of teaching and learning. Our community is devoted to providing supports for the aspirations of our adolescents as they mature into adults with ambitious plans for college and careers.

The Newark High School Vision: Staff embody the school values and impart confidence while providing an inviting classroom environment with clear expectations and specific academic and behavioral goals. Students embody the school values through intellectual and emotional perseverance. Families embody the school values while remaining actively involved as advocates for their children and supporters of the school programs and staff.

The Newark High School Values: Safe, Responsible, Trustworthy, and Respectful.