An ode to sleeping in the forest

Pablo Neruda and Mary Oliver

"An Ode to Enchanted Light" and "Sleeping in the Forest"

"An Ode to Enchanted Light"

Under the trees light
has dropped from the top of the sky,
light
like a green
latticework of branches,
shining
on every leaf,
drifting down like clean
white sand.

A cicada sends
its sawing song
high into the empty air.

The world is
a glass overflowing
with water.

"Sleeping in the Forest"

I thought the earth remembered me, she
took me back so tenderly, arranging
her dark skirts, her pockets
full of lichens and seeds. I slept
as never before, a stone
on the riverbed, nothing
between me and the white fire of the stars
but my thoughts, and they floated
light as moths among the branches
of the perfect trees. All night
I heard the small kingdoms breathing
around me, the insects, and the birds
who do their work in the darkness. All night
I rose and fell, as if in water, grappling
with a luminous doom. By morning
I had vanished at least a dozen times
into something better.

Introduction

"Sleeping in the Forest" and "An Ode to Enchanted Light" are two poems written by influential poem artists Pablo Neruda and Mary Oliver. They contain unique rhyme patterns and Language. You will now be informed about the tone, language, and form.

Tone and word choice

"Sleeping in the Forest" had a dark tone and a melancholy feel. While "An Ode to Enchanted Light" had a more uplifting feel and did not express death. Both though did use words with a nice feel at the way end.

Figurative Language

Sleeping in the Forest starts off with personification, namely " she
took me back so tenderly, arranging
her dark skirts, her pockets
full of lichens and seeds." Then, a metaphor was used, specifically " I slept
as never before, a stone
on the riverbed."

However, An Ode to Enchanted Light used plenty of similes and metaphors and no personification.

Form and Structure

An Ode to enchanted light has three stanzas and no rhyme scheme.

Sleeping in the Forest had eighteen stanzas and does not have a rhyme scheme. So both poems are free-verse.

Conclusion

Both poems were unique in their own ways and similar in the same fashion. Both used free-verse structure and metaphors, but one had personification and one had similes, also one had six times the number of stanzas.