Colts Chronicle

Carter Lomax Middle School

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Dates to Remember

11/19-11/23 Thanksgiving Break

11/27 Evening with the Arts

11/30 Club Day

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Coach's Corner

The volleyball coaches would like to take the opportunity to thank the parents for allowing us the wonderful experience of working with your daughters. We have watched them bloom not just as an athlete but as a young lady representing Carter Lomax. We wish the girls well in any endeavor they may undertake.

We hope that we will see them in the future as a Bondy player and a Pasadena Memorial volleyball player.

Lomax Black

From left to right 1st row

Emma Rodriguez, Mattison Smith, Clarissa Salas, Heavenly Rodarte, Dayami Reyes, Addlyn Dinsdale, Elizabeth Lozano

2nd row

Coach Bagwill, Kinsley Smith, Kailey Montoya, Kendrah Lozano, Gemma Perez, Noemy Quintanilla, Coach Brian Dinsdale

3rd row

Coach Roxana Cruz and Coach Chrisel Gonzalez

Not pictured are Miah Morales and Coach Amyx

Lomax Red

From left to right 1st row

Sarai Sanchez, Katy Moncayo, Julia Paola Gonzalez,

2nd row

Coach Bagwill, Alexa Lopez, Ayla Mendoza, Jennifer Garcia, Alexa Gudino, Sariah Morris, Coach Roxana Cruz

3rd row

Coach Chrisel Gonzalez and Coach Brian Dinsdale

Not pictured are Lilly Thomas, Ariana Villatta and Coach Amyx

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Team Spotlight - Team Baylor

This week we are highlighting the awesome work being done by the teachers on Team Baylor! Teachers mentored their students, did one on one tutorials, and held workshops to prepare students to pass their focus area content assessments. Keep working hard, Team Baylor!
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Career Day

College Week

College and Career Readiness

This week Lomax Middle School hosted our annual Career Day. Thank you to those of you who presented your careers and occupations to our students. Our students enjoyed listening to the variety of professionals that participated.


Students also had the opportunity to complete a career interest survey based on Dr. John Holland’s theory that people and work environments can be loosely classified into six different groups. Different people’s personalities may find different environments more to their liking.



Below is a description of the 6 different groups.


Realistic


  • REALISTIC occupational personality types like to work with their hands, focus on things in the physical world and use physical skills. They like to explore places and things and frequently have a desire for adventure. They like to repair and make things with their hands, tools, and machines. Outdoor work is often preferred.
  • Characteristics: stable, assertive, physical strength, practical
  • Problem Solving: Prefers problems that are concentrate rather than abstract. Wants practical solutions that can be acted out.



Investigative


  • INVESTIGATIVE occupational personality types tend to focus on ideas. They enjoy collecting and analyzing data and information. They are curious and tend to be creative and original. Investigative types are task oriented, and tend to prefer loosely structured situations with minimal rules or regulations, although some structure contributes to their creativity.
  • Characteristics: Reserved, independent, analytical, logical
  • Problem Solving: Prefers to think through, rather than act out problems.



Artistic


  • ARTISTIC occupational personality types are the most creative of all the types and tend to focus on self-expression through various forms/mediums: images, materials, music, words, movement, as well as systems and programs. They are able to see possibilities in various settings and are not afraid to experiment with their ideas. They like variety and tend to feel cramped in structured situations.
  • Characteristics: Intuitive, creative, expressive, unconventional
  • Problem Solving: Deals with problems in intuitive, expressive, and independent ways. Tends to be adverse to rules.



Social


  • The SOCIAL occupational personality type is concerned with people and their welfare. Social types make friends easily and tend to have well developed communication skills. They enjoy working with groups or individuals, using empathy and an ability to identify and solve problems, and tend to be high achievers and good leaders.
  • Characteristics: Humanistic, verbal, interpersonal, responsible
  • Problem Solving: Deals with problems through feelings. Flexible approach to problems.



Enterprising


  • ENTERPRISING occupational personality types are goal-oriented and want to see results. They work with and through people, providing leadership and delegating responsibilities for organizational and/or financial gain. These people tend to function with a high degree of energy. They prefer business settings, and often want social events to have a purpose beyond socializing.
  • Characteristics: Persuasive, confident, demonstrate leadership, interest in power/status
  • Problem Solving: Attacks problems with leadership skills. Decision Maker.



Conventional


  • CONVENTIONAL occupational personality types are oriented to completing tasks initiated by others. They pay attention to detail, and prefer to work with data, particularly in the numerical, statistical, and record-keeping realm. They have a high sense of responsibility, follow the rules, and want to know precisely what is expected of them.
  • Characteristics: Conscientious, efficient, concern for rules and regulation, orderly
  • Problem Solving: Prefers clearly defined, practical problems. Prefers to solve problems by applying rules



After completing the survey students calculated their Holland Code; These two or three letters, for example, a code of “RES” would most resemble the Realistic type, somewhat less resemble the Enterprising type, and resemble the Social type even less. The types that are not in your code are the types you resemble least of all. Most people and most jobs are best represented by some combination of two or three of the Holland interest areas. In addition, most people are most satisfied if there is some degree of fit between their personality and their work environment.


Ask your student about what their Holland Code was and what they thought about it. They may also do additional research on occupations that may interest them.


***We will be sending these home after we return from Thanksgiving break***

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Spelling Bee

The Lomax Spelling Bee was held this Thursday with 20 of our top spellers. We are proud of the hard work shown by each and every participant. Congratulations to 1st place winner Jennifer Le and 2nd place winner Jesus Ortiz who will be representing Lomax at the District Spelling Bee.
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October Teacher of the Month

Congratulations to our October teachers of the month - Mr. Hernandez from 5th grade and Mrs. Fleming from 6th grade. You both make us so proud!
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Texas Invitational

The Texas high school basketball season kicked off this weekend with the McDonald's Invitational Tournament. Lomax 6th graders were able to attend a basketball game at Pasadena Memorial if they met requirements on their focus areas and projects. They cheered the Mavericks on to a victory on Friday afternoon and celebrated their success!


The tournament will continue throughout the weekend with championship games being played on Saturday at Phillips Field House. The girls championship will be played at 3 p.m. and the boys championship is at 6 p.m.

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PISD Police Deptartment - Toys for Tots

We will again be collecting new toys in conjunction with the Pasadena ISD Police

Department’s Toys for Tots Campaign. If you would like to participate, please bring in

new unwrapped toys beginning Monday, November 26th. Toys may be delivered to Ms. Segura's in room 126.

Weekly Parent Connect

This week at Carter Lomax, we have been celebrating college week. Students were able to participate in some college activities. It is never too early to begin discussing college readiness with your child. See some tips below that can prepare you and your child for college:


Retrieved from the American Council on Education website: http://www.acenet.edu/Content/NavigationMenu/ProgramsServices/CIP/Preparing/Guide1.htm



  • Encourage your child to challenge him or herself academically, develop good study habits, and become involved in school- and community-based extracurricular activities.
A positive school experience that is both academically challenging and rich in extracurricular activities is important in itself and as preparation for college.




  • Discuss career and college options with your child and encourage his or her aspirations.

Many students assume that higher education is not for them or that the jobs they are interested in don't require college. Today, some form of formal postsecondary education or training is required for almost every well-paying job. With $60 billion in financial aid available, college is possible for almost every American. So encourage your child to aim high, explore all the options, and plan to attend college.



If students don't take the right courses in middle school, they may be shut out of the college preparatory track in high school. The U.S. Department of Education recommends that middle and junior high school students take Algebra I in 8th Grade, Geometry in 9th Grade, and English, Science, and History or Geography every year. Foreign language, computer, and visual or performing art classes are also recommended.


Parent coordinator/5th grade counselor,

Tara Crum

tcrum@pasadenaisd.org

6th grade counselor/bilingual

Cynthia Pena

cpena@pasadenaisd.org

Parent Connect


You will be receiving an email from Summit Learning inviting you to login to the platform and see your student's information. Having your own Parent Connect account allows you to view your child's goals for the week, current grades, and dues dates for Focus Areas, Projects, and Concept Units.


When you receive the email from Summit Learning, you will only need to follow the link, watch the video, and create your own password for the account. If you do not receive an email, contact your child's homeroom teacher.