The NSA

They are doing what with our phone data?!?!?!

Why we don't want to have the NSA tracking our cell phones

We chose to go against the idea of the NSA because we hate the thought of having our phones basically hacked to "protect the country". We are protected under the 4th amendment from unreasonable search and seizure. That means that if we are being suspicious, the government can create a probable cause backed by evidence if they want to search us. Then they have to get a search warrant particularly describing what to look for, where to look for it, and who to search. In our opinion if we type the word president we are beginning to be searched. This, to us, is constituted as unreasonable search and seizure.


The NSA puts in a little paragraph saying that they will go into your phone and take some of your data. No one actually reads the contract so we have no clue what they are doing. The NSA should not be tracking our phones and storing the data in huge buildings. It is unlawful to basically spy on the people who would never do anything to harm this country we call home. So why do we need to be tracked?

Our Supporting Evidence


The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals said no this week to tracking your movements using data from your cell phone without a warrant when it declared that this information is constitutionally protected.




that the government’s other “metadata” collection programs are unconstitutional.

District of Columbia judge held that the bulk collection of phone records violates the Fourth Amendment

a GPS-tracking device to a vehicle and using the device to monitor the car’s movements was a trespass that violated the Fourth Amendment because it interfered with the defendant’s property interest in the car.

the Eleventh Circuit concluded that under the “reasonable expectation of privacy” test, cell phone location data is also protected under the Fourth Amendment, since this data can reveal private matters such as “being near the home of a lover, or a dispensary of medication, or a place of worship, or a house of ill repute”.

The Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals said no this week to tracking your movements using data from your cell phone without a warrant when it declared that this information is constitutionally protected.

government’s collection of all kinds of business records and transactional data — commonly called “metadata” — for law enforcement and national security purposes may also be unconstitutional.

Relying on the Jones concurrences, the Eleventh Circuit concluded that under the “reasonable expectation of privacy” test, cell phone location data is also protected under the Fourth Amendment, since this data can reveal private matters such as “being near the home of a lover, or a dispensary of medication, or a place of worship, or a house of ill repute”.


THE ELEVENTH CIRCUIT CONCLUDED THAT UNDER THE “REASONABLE EXPECTATION OF PRIVACY” TEST, LOCATION INFORMATION IS FOURTH AMENDMENT PROTECTED.

Creators

Olivia, Reagan, and Alyse