Fronts

Made By- Isabella Gomez

Cold Front

Definition- A boundary where cold air and warm air meet, the warm air gets pushed up causing the ground level to be cold.

Occurs- When a fast moving cold air mass runs into a slow moving warm air mass. Since cold air is denser, then warm air, the cold air stays near the ground and the warm air is being pushed up.

Weather- When a cold front occurs the weather that is followed is a rain storm. Cumulus and Cumulonimbus clouds are formed. Once it passes it is very cold and dry.

Warm Front

Definition- A boundary where a warm air mass meets a cold air mass and pushes it causing more warm air to be at ground level.

Occurs- When a moving warm air mass leads into a cold air mass and pushes it away and leaves the warm air the majority on the ground.

Weather- When a warm front occurs the weather is showers and light rain fall. Cirrus and Cirrostratus clouds form. When the front passes the weather is usually dry and humid.

Stationary Front

Definition- A boundary where cold air and warm air meet each other and stay put causing the stationary front.

Occurs- When cold air meets warm air and neither is denser than the other so they stay put. Making the center of the air condense.

Weather- When a stationary front occurs the weather is rainy, snowy, fogs or clouds form. When clouds form, they are regular. When it passes the weather is usually humid. (Warm or Cold depends on what side you were on.)

Occluded Front

Definition- The boundary during the process in which a cold front is taking over a warm front. Then the warm air separates.

Occurs- When a cold front is in the process of taking over a warm front. When the warm air separates this is when it occurs.

Weather- When an Occluded front occurs the weather is usually cool because the warm air is being pushed up. After the only weather that may occur is rain, snow or clouds. The clouds that form with an Occluded front are cumulonimbus or nimbostratus clouds.

All weather occurs because of Fronts and Pressure

Meteorologist Ryan Davidson Explains Weather Maps