Boron

By Bailee Hudson and Arianna Green

Information

History:
  • discovered by French chemists, Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac and Louis-Jaques Thenard and Sir Humphrey Davy in 1808.
  • separated the boron by heating borax with potassium.
Properties:
  • solid at room temperature
  • flammable
  • metallic
  • can produce infrared light
Uses:
  • pyrotechnics and flares to give off green light
  • rockets as ignition source
  • eye drops
  • antiseptics
  • tile glazes
Compounds:
  • Boric Acid (H3BO3)
  • Diborane (B2H6)

Periodic Table Information

Atomic Number: 5

Atomic Mass: 10.811

Protons: 5

Neutrons: 6

Electrons: 5

Nuclide Notation: 5/11 B

Hyphen Notation: B-11

Group Properties

  • have three valence electrons
  • have roles in the ecosystem
  • soft texture
  • good heat conductors
  • high boiling points
  • known to form trivalent oxides

Stoichiometry

Balanced Chemical Equation:

4B + 3O2(g) → 2B2O3(s)


Moles in 100 g of Boron:

100g|1 mol | = 9.25 mol

| 10.811 g|

Specific Heat

Specific Heat:

  • 1.026 J/g*C
  • 2565 J to change 100 g of boron 25*C

Melting Point:

  • 2348 K
  • 2075 *C
  • 3767 *F

Boiling Point

  • 4273 K
  • 4000 *C
  • 7232 *F

Acrostic Poem

B- boron is metallic

O- only non-metal in group 13

R- resistant to thermal expansion

O- optical characteristics include ability to transmit infrared light

N- named after the mineral borax

Types of Reactions

Synthesis
  • 2B(s) + 3F2(g) → 2BF3(g)

Decomposition

  • 2BCl3(g) → 2B(s) + 3Cl2(g)

Single Replacement


Double Replacement

Bonding

Compound
  • B2O3
Formula Name
  • Boron Trioxide
Percent composition
  • 31% Boron, 69% Oxygen
Fluorine and boron - Fluor und Bor