Albie Sachs

By: Brooke Cushman

The Life of Albie Sachs

Albie Sachs was born in 1935 to a South African family, he attended schools in Cape Town throughout his childhood. He attended law school at the University of Cape Town while being heavily involved in the Defiance Campaign. He was also there when the Freedom Charter was being constructed, that led him to wanting to defend people who were wrongly accused of crimes or not given fair trials. He began defending the accused at only age 21, he would defend racial crimes and people who allegedly broke security laws. He was placed in solitary confinement because of his work with the freedom movement, then went into exile in England for eleven years. While there he earned his PhD and then went on to teach in Mozambique. While there in 1988, a bomb was placed in his car, causing him to lose his sight in one eye and losing an arm. After the event, he fully devoted himself to helping the ANC create a democratic South Africa. He succeeded and was asked to serve on their new Constitutional Court as a judge.

Albie Sachs in the Anti-Apartheid Movement

Albie Sachs was the type of man who used knowledge as power and his brain to his benefit. Sachs did not appreciate the unjust way of South Africa and did not stand idly by, he chose an education to help those who were not so fortunate. Albie Sachs was a man devoted to helping others, he allowed for people to be fairly tried which sparked nationalism in many. He showed the blacks of South Africa that awful situations can be changed if you try hard enough and fight for what you believe in. In a way, Albie Sachs signifies what the anti-apartheid is all about, working toward a goal to help more than just yourself. Albie Sachs never backed down in the face of fear, showing what true passion looks like and why the people of South Africa should never give up.
21 Icons : Albie Sachs : Short Film

Present day Albie Sachs reminiscing on his accomplishments and his life long journey of helping South Africa.

Work Cited

"Justice Albie Sachs." Constitutioncalcourt.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Nov. 2015.