Hammurabi's Code

Hammurabi's code was just.

The Justice of Hammurabi's Code

Hammurabi's code was meant to spread equality throughout Babylonia, and hope that everyone would be treated with equality and fairness. The gods accepted Hammurabi as the ruler of Babylonia. Hammurabi's epilogue to his code is him explaining how the laws should be carried out.

Laws 215 and 218

Law 215: If a surgeon has operated with a bronze lancet on the body of a free ... and saves the man's life, he shall receive 10 shekels of silver.

This law is just because the free man received a healthy body, so the surgeon received something as well.

Law 218: If a surgeon has operated with a bronze lancet on a free man for a serious injury, and has caused his death, ... his hands shall be cut off.

This law is also just because the free man lost his life, so the surgeon loses his hands.

The equality I've been talking about is right here. The man gained something, so the surgeon gained something. Or in the other case, the man lost something, so the surgeon lost something.

About Hammurabi

Hammurabi ruled Babylonia until the fall of Babylonia, when Nebuchenezzar reunited Babylonia. But, Hammurabi was all about equality. He made his code for the reason of equality. As he writes in the Epilogue, "Hammurabi, the protecting king am I. ...That the strong might not injure the weak, in order to protect the widows and orphans, ..." Hammurabi had a good heart, that's why his law was just.