United States Constitution

The Seven Articles

Mnemonic Device

Lunar Elephants Jump Slowly After Seeing Rats

Article 1 (Lunar)

Article one of the United States Constitution refers to the Legislative Branch of the government. The Legislative Branch of the government creates laws that are put before state laws . Article one also outlines the powers that the Legislative Branch holds.

Article 2 (Elephants)

Article two of the United States Constitution refers to the Executive Branch of the government. The Executive Branch of the government is responsible for executing the laws and enforcing them. Article two also describes the responsibilities and duties of the executive branch and states that elected officials may be impeached if the commit a crime.

Article 3 (Jump)

Article three of the United States Constitution refers to the Judicial Branch of the government. The Judicial Branch of the government is assigned the task of interpreting the laws that are set forth. Article three states that federal judges are appointed, not elected, for a life term which can be cut short if the appointed judge retires or is removed. Article tree also insures trial by jury for criminal cases and explains the crime of treason.

Article 4 (Slowly)

Article four of the United States Constitution deals with the States. Article four discusses the rights of the states and how relations between the states would be handled. Section three of article four puts forth the process of admitting new states to the union.

Article 5 (After)

Article five of the United States Constitution deals with the amendment process. Article five outlines the two ways in which to propose an amendment to the Constitution. In order to propose and pass an amendment to the Constitution a bill must be passed in the US Senate and House of Representatives by at least a 2/3 margin. After the bill is passed it must be approved by 3/4 of the state's legislatures or conventions in order for the bill to become an amendment.

Article 6 (Seeing)

Article six of the United States Constitution deals with the how the laws will work. Article six states that the constitution is the "Law of the Land" and that all government officials and judges are bound to this supreme law. Article six requires all government officials to take and uphold an oath to the Constitution. This article also states that no religious qualification will exist for election or for appointment to public office.

Article 7 (Rats)

Article seven of the United States Constitution outlines the process of ratifying the Constitution. In order to ratify the Constitution, nine out of the thirteen states would have to approve, or sign off on, the Constitution. If the Constitution was approved it would replace the current Articles of Confederation and would become Law.