Civil Rights Movement

by Bailey Brouillette

Did the Civil Rights Movement change American's views then and what is the effect today?

During the Civil Rights Movement, nonviolent protest and civil disobedience were used to get one point across, that segregation was unconstitutional and that it needed to change. It took about 14 years, but after those long years, two amendments, five Civil Rights Acts, and one Voting Rights Act were passed. But there's still one question, how has it affected us today?

1954-1968

Throughout the years,many forms of of civil disobedience were used. Nonviolent protest was highly recommended, because if somebody attacked you while you were peacefully protesting, it would seem very cruel. There were many boycotts, such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Greensboro sit-ins.


Although there were peaceful protests, some people preached about using violence to end the hate. Malcolm X preached that if the white people were to use violence, then the black people should use it too. Even though he preached violence, he is still believed to be one of the most influential African Americans in history. Martin Luther King Jr. was a man who preached peace, on the other hand. He orchestrated the three Selma to Montgomery marches with the SNCC, SCLC, and DCVL. There were many African Americans who helped these causes, but these two men are the most famous.


There were many successful boycotts, and the Montgomery Bus Boycott started it all. The acts of nonviolence helped the cause that ended up ending segregation. All of the boycotts, sit-ins, freedoms rides, and marches.

Unsung heroes

William Moore

William Moore was a white man who stood up for the Civil Rights Movement. He went to jail for standing up for a couple of black kids in a movie theater. He only spent the night, but when he was released, he was shot and killed with a .22 rifle. Nobody was tried or convicted for his murder. As a white man, his contribution meant a lot, since not a lot of white people wanted to help the movement.

Jimmie Jackson

Jimmie Jackson was a black high school graduate. Him and his mother went on a march that got violent. He was shot and killed defending his mother from state troopers. The troopers were never identified and charges were never brought upon them. Jimmie Jackson's dedication to the civil rights movement made his death memorable.

Important Groups to the Civil Rights Movement

NAACP

The NAACP, The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, is the oldest and largest group associated with the Civil Rights Movement. They were founded on February 12, 1909, "to ensure the political, educational, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination."

CORE

The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was founded in 1942, and became one of the leading activist organizations when the Civil Rights Movement started. In the 1960s, CORE, with the help of other organizations, got a lot of things done. They helped with the freedom rides, sit-ins, and the 1963 March on Washington. CORE was a non-violent group fighting to end segregation.