Digital Citizenship

by: Alison Madison, S9GS Librarian & Media Specialist

Online Behavior

Digital Citizenship is all about understanding and practicing RESPECT online.


  • Respect other's works
  • Respect other's feelings
  • Respect oneself


It encompasses every single way we all interact on the World Wide Web.

The formal definition of Digital Citizenship includes: the norms of behavior with regard to technology use. It is teaching users the rules of good citizenship online.

9 General Areas of Behavior that Make Up Digital Citizenship

Etiquette / Communication / Education / Access / Commerce / Responsibility / Rights / Safety / Security


Image by Lauren Brownell

What Teachers Need to Know

The following are College and Career Ready Anchor Standards that include Digital Citizenship and Internet Ethics.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

Key Vocabulary:

  1. Creative Commons: a kind of copyright that makes it easy for people to copy, share, and build on someone's creative work--*as long as they give the creator credit for it.
  2. Public Domain- a creative work that is not protected by copyright and is therefore free for one to use


CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Key Vocabulary:

  1. Website Evaluation: a guide for evaluating the the reliability of a website
  2. Creative Works: all types of work that someone creates, including writing of all kinds, artwork, and photos, videos, and music
  3. MLA (attributing creative works): writing style for documentation


English Language Arts and World History

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and not print digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefuleness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

Key Vocabulary:

See Above

OPEN PROFESSIONALS EDUCATION NETWORK

OER: OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES

This is an AWESOME, FREE resource to use with all of your classes.


The OER site contains links to numerous websites that YOU and your STUDENTS can use to search and find open licensed media - free to use and free to share.

http://open4us.org/find-oer/

Common Sense Media For Educators

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Visit http://www.commonsensemedia.org/educators to access free grade level specific, common core aligned resources, lessons, and videos that cover topics like Digital Literacy, Digital Citizenship, and Information Literacy.


Creative Commons: Copyright-Friendly Content and More

Creative Commons: Copyright-friendly content and more

Searching Digital Content: Common Questions

  • How do you want your students to use the Internet?
  • How and where do you want them to gather information?
  • How will they determine if the source is credible?
  • How will they incorporate the information they find?
  • How will they give credit to the author or creator?

Useful Vocabulary for Students

  1. Intellectual Property: creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names and images used in commerce
  2. Creative Works: all types of work that someone creates, including writing of all kinds, artwork, photos, videos, and music
  3. Digital Citizenship: the norms of behavior with regard to technology use. It is teaching users the rules of good citizenship online.
  4. Plagiarism (or to plagiarize): to use the words or ideas of another person as if they were your own words or ideas
  5. Copyright: a law that protects a creator's ownership of and control over the work he or she creates, requiring other people to get the creator's permission before they copy, share, or perform that work
  6. Fair Use: the ability to use a small amount of someone's creative work without permission, but only in certain ways
  7. Public Domain: creative work that's not protected by copyright and is therefore free for one to use
  8. Commercial Purposes: a use in connection with a business, usually for profit
  9. Creative Commons: a kind of copyright that makes it easy for people to copy, share, and build on someone's creative work--*as long as they give the creator credit for it.
  10. MLA (Modern Language Association): writing style for documentation

Great Search Aides for Students

Check List for Students

  1. Check who owns it.
  2. Get permission to use it.
  3. Give credit to the creator of the work - avoid plagiarism.
  4. Buy it (if necessary).
  5. Use it responsibly.
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