Angels Of Epilepsy

February - #AOENEWS, Blogs, Articles, & More!

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In a first-in-world clinical trial, researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine are studying how well focused ultrasound surgery works in adults with a specific type of epilepsy whose seizures are not controlled by medication.


Up to 10 adults with the “medically refractory lobe focal onset” type of epilepsy will be enrolled in this study. The technique uses magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound through an intact skull to reach tissue deep in the brain without incisions or radiation. With this technology, 1,024 ultrasound beams pass through the scalp, skull and brain tissue without causing any harm and converge at a focal point to ablate specific brain tissue involved in epilepsy.


Epilepsy is the fourth most common neurological disorder, affecting 65 million people worldwide, including 3.4 million people in the United States, according to the Epilepsy Foundation. This disease, which can affect people of all ages, is characterized by unpredictable seizures. Epilepsy is a spectrum condition with a wide range of seizure types, including focal onset (partial) or general.


Read more: https://news.osu.edu/ohio-state-leading-worlds-first-study-using-focused-ultrasound-to-treat-epilepsy/

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On Tuesday, February 5, at 6 pm ET, you’re invited to join us on Black Ladies in Public Health’s Facebook page for a Live discussion on "Living Black with Epilepsy." Dr. Jasmine Ward will help you talk with leaders from the Epilepsy Foundation and advocate Natalie Beavers of Angels of Epilepsy.

This event is part of our #BlackHistoryMonth efforts to increase awareness of, and education about, epilepsy among minority and diverse populations.


#EpilepsyEquity #BLiPHLive #EpilepsyAwareness.


More information: https://www.epilepsy.com/event/facebook-live-living-black-epilepsy?utm_source=Epilepsy+Foundation&utm_campaign=90b233d4b1-Epilepsy_News_01_30_19&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_cf0feb6500-90b233d4b1-12040025

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In the almost two years since I was introduced to WEGO Health, the exposure and assistance I have received is unmeasurable. Becoming a Patient Leader to better interact with our community has been nothing short of remarkable. I’ve been introduced to meeting many survivors here in the U.S. and around the world.


To say becoming a Patient Leader with WEGO Health has given me courage is an understatement! It has truly given me hope. One thing that really fueled me was having the opportunity to attend the HealtheVoices Conference in Chicago (April 2018).


Meeting so many survivors and advocates dealing with different types of illnesses and medical disabilities was immensely empowering. Being able to be surrounded with so many amazing, beautiful spirits continuously, encouraged me to keep going and not give up. If I were to compare myself to a vehicle, WEGO Health would definitely be my wheels because they keep me in motion!


Read more: https://www.wegohealth.com/2019/01/30/5-tips-becoming-patient-leader/

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Participate in Project UPlift Telephone Program

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Are you African American and 18 years of age or older?


Join the Project UPLIFT program which is a weekly or monthly check-in that includes a 1 hour telephone survey session.


If you choose to participate, you will be compensated for your time! If you have any questions, please contact project staff at 404-756-8848 or send email to: epilepsystudy@msm.edu

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Your brain regulates your sleep-wake cycle, when you get tired and when you fall asleep, and how much time you spend in each stage of sleep. The electrical charges that develop into seizures also begin in the brain. Since both seizures and sleep occur in the brain, it makes sense that they would be connected.


Sleep problems and epilepsy share a complex relationship where each impacts the other. One study summarized it thusly:


  • Electrical brain activity during light sleep may spur seizures.
  • Daytime seizures and antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) like anticonvulsant can contribute to fragmented sleep and reduced sleep efficiency.
  • Comorbid sleep disorders further disrupt sleep, exacerbate symptoms of epilepsy, and impair overall quality of life.
  • Some symptoms of the sleep disorders themselves mimic seizures, which can prevent individuals from receiving a proper diagnosis and effective treatment afterwards


The most common sleep problems affecting individuals with epilepsy include nocturnal seizures and insomnia, sleep deprivation and daytime fatigue, and sleep apnea.


Read more: https://www.tuck.com/epilepsy-and-sleep/

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Meet Natalie Y. Beavers of Angels of Epilepsy in Smyrna

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Born and raised in Southwest Atlanta. I was diagnosed with Epilepsy at the age of 5 and it was a quite challenge dealing with a brain disorder. But growing up in the 80’s, I had friends and classmates that didn’t look at me different if I would have a seizure in the classroom or playground. They called for help or was right there by my side. It’s very different now with this generation dealing with a disability like this one.


During my later middle school years and high school years, I had no episodes (seizures). Doctors stated to my parents that I have “grown out” of having seizures. But my freshman year in college, it returned. Not quite frequent. I still could live a normal life. I became a mother of 2 boys and continued to work extremely hard to manage my household. All I felt like doing was work. It was a major task that was a must for me.


Working two jobs, I had a Nanny to reside with me Monday-Friday to assist me with my children. Every Friday morning before work, I would take my baby boy to her house so his father can get him after work. In June 2006, I was driving to work on that Friday, taking my son and Nanny to her home before work. I remember singing with my son and all of sudden, I felt strange and told my Nanny, “I need to pull over.” Being on an major interstate, I had a seizure while driving. My Nanny took the wheel of the car to save us. But a major accident happened and someone lost their life. And that’s when my entire life changed.


Read more: http://voyageatl.com/interview/meet-natalie-y-beavers-angels-epilepsy-smyrna/

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First-Aid For Seizures

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Angels Of Epilepsy visit schools, camps, health-seminars, churches, and even some businesses to give first-aid tips for seizures and educational information about epilepsy.


For more information and bookings, send email to: angelsofepilepsy@gmail.com

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxWRB6jOlac
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