3rd Six Weeks Project

By:Glory Russell 1st period

Baking Soda (NaHCO3) and Hydrochloric Acid (HCl)

Double Displacement Sodium Bicarbonate and HCl

This reaction is a double replacement and decomposition

Balanced Equation

NaHCO3(aq)+HCl(aq)->CO2(g)+H2O(l)+NaCl(s)

Baking soda and Hydrochloric Acid makes Carbon Dioxide and Water and Sodium Chloride

Molar Mass of Reactants and Products

NaHCO3=84.0006 g/mole

HCl=36.461 g/mole

CO2=43.991 g/mole

H2O=18.015 g/mole

NaCl=58.443 g/mole

Mole to Mole Conversion

You start out with Mole A/ the given (In this case it is NaHCo3) on top. Then you put one mole on the bottom of Mole A. Then you want to end up with Mole B in the end so you put Mole B(NaCl) on top. The ratio will depend on the coefficients in the balanced equation(In this case they both had a coefficient of one). Then you multiply across the top and divide by the bottom.
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Mass to Mass Conversions

You start with 12.1 grams of NaHCO3(Mole A) then you put the molar mass of NaHCO3 on the bottom, which is 84.006 grams. Then you put one mole on top (because 84.006 grams of NaHCO3 is equal to one mole of NaHCO3). Then you use the coefficient ratio, which in this case is one to one. One mole of NaHCO3 on bottom and one mole of HCl on the top. Then to get rid of moles you put one mole of HCl on the bottom. Then you put the molar mass of HCl (you get it from the periodic table). Then you multiply across the top and divide by the bottom and you should get 5.25 grams of HCl.
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Limiting and Excess Reactant

Percent Yield

You can find percent yields by dividing the actual yield by the theoretical yield, then multiplying by 100.
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