How to become a Naturalized citizen

by: Adeline, Mikaela, and Paige

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Where do you go to become a citizen?

To apply for naturalization, file Form N-400, Application for Naturalization. http://www.uscis.gov/n-400

What are the requirements for becoming a citizen?

  • If you are at least 18 years old and have been a Permanent Resident for the past 5 years and have no special circumstances.
  • If you are at least 18 years old and are currently married to and living with a U.S. citizen; and have been married to and living with that same U.S. citizen for the past 3 years; and your spouse has been a U.S. citizen for the past 3 years.
  • If you are in the U.S. Armed Forces (or will be filing your application within 6 months of an honorable discharge); and have served for at least 1 year.
  • If you are at least 18 years old and were in the U.S. Armed Forces for less than 1 year or if you are at least 18 years old and were in the U.S. Armed Forces for 1 year or more, but you were discharged more than 6 months ago.
  • If you performed active duty military service during: World War I (April 6, 1917-November 11, 1918); World War II (September 1, 1939-December 31, 1946); Korea (June 25, 1950-July 1, 1955); Vietnam (February 28, 1961-October 15, 1978); Persian Gulf (August 2, 1990-April 11, 1991); or On or after September 11, 2001.
  • If you are at least 18 years old and were married to a U.S. citizen who died during a period of honorable active duty service in the U.S. Armed Forces.

  • If you are at least 18 years old and are a U.S. national (a non-citizen who owes permanent allegiance to the United States); and have become a resident of any State; and are otherwise qualified for naturalization.

What is the application process?

Step 1. Determine if you are already a U.S. citizen.

Step 2. Determine if you are eligible to become a U.S. citizen.

Step 3. Prepare your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization.

Step 4. Submit your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization.

Step 5. Go to the biometrics appointment, if applicable.

Step 6. Complete the interview.

Step 7. Receive a decision from USCIS on your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization.

USCIS will issue you a written notice of decision.

  • Granted—USCIS may approve your Form N-400 if the evidence in your record establishes that you are eligible for naturalization.

  • Continued—USCIS may continue your application if you need to provide additional evidence/documentation, fail to provide USCIS the correct documents, or fail the English and/or civics test the first time.

  • Denied—USCIS will deny your Form N-400 if the evidence in your record establishes you are not eligible for naturalization.

Step 8. Receive a notice to take the Oath of Allegiance. You may be able to participate in a naturalization ceremony on the same day as your interview. If a same day naturalization ceremony is unavailable, USCIS will mail you a notification with the date, time, and location of your scheduled ceremony.

Step 9. Take the Oath of Allegiance to the United States.

You are not a U.S. citizen until you take the Oath of Allegiance at a naturalization ceremony.

How do you get an interview with an immigration official and what is it?

To become a naturalized U.S. citizen, you must pass the naturalization test. At your naturalization interview, you will be required to answer questions about your application and background. You will also take an English and civics test unless you qualify for an exemption or waiver.

What is the practice immigration test?

It is a Oral test and to pass you have to get 6/10 correct.

What is a citizenship ceremony?

If USCIS approves your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, we will schedule you to take the Oath of Allegiance at a naturalization ceremony. Taking the oath will complete the process of becoming a U.S. citizen.

Types of Ceremonies:

  • In a judicial ceremony, the court administers the Oath of Allegiance.
  • In an administrative ceremony, USCIS administers the Oath of Allegiance.
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What are the rights you gain as a new citizen?

  • Voting. Only U.S. citizens can vote in Federal elections. Most States also restrict the right to vote, in most elections, to U.S. citizens.

  • Bringing family members to the United States. Citizens generally get priority when petitioning to bring family members permanently to this country.

  • Obtaining citizenship for children born abroad. In most cases, a child born abroad to a U.S. citizen is automatically a U.S. citizen.

  • Traveling with a U.S. passport.
    A U.S. passport allows you to get assistance from the U.S. government when overseas.

  • Becoming eligible for Federal jobs. Most jobs with government agencies require U.S. citizenship.

  • Becoming an elected official. Many elected offices in this country require U.S. citizenship.

  • Showing your patriotism. In addition, becoming a U.S. citizen is a way to demonstrate your commitment to your new country.


    These are some of the more important rights you gain as a new citizen

What are the responsibilities you gain as a citizen?

To become a U.S. citizen you must take the Oath of Allegiance. The oath includes several promises you make when you become a U.S. citizen, including promises to:

• Give up all prior allegiance to any other nation or sovereignty;

• Swear allegiance to the United States;

• Support and defend the Constitution and the laws of the United States; and

• Serve the country when required.

U.S. citizens have many responsibilities other than the ones mentioned in the Oath. Citizens have a responsibility to participate in the political process by registering and voting in elections. Serving on a jury is another responsibility of citizenship. Finally, America becomes stronger when all of its citizens respect the different opinions, cultures, ethnic groups, and religions found in this country. Tolerance for differences is also a responsibility of citizenship.

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