Music in Our Schools Month

Classroom Resources from KET

March is 'Music in Our Schools Month.'


The following resources include videos and interactives that deal with music - the history, the instruments, the styles, and even copyright issues involved. Many of these resources can be easily integrated into content classes.


More resources can be found within KET Encyclomedia.

Music Store Field Trip

Music Store Field Trip. Penny and the KidVision VPK Kids make music at a Sam Ash Music Store. They play instruments, participate in a drum circle, and dance like crazy with a D.J. Join us! Let's rock 'n' roll!


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades PreK-3.

Children's Song and Dance

Children's Song and Dance. This performance combines Han and minority ethnic Chinese traditions. The first two songs and dances are from the Han tradition, while the others are from minority traditions. The costumes are from the Uyghur people, who live mainly in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northeastern China. A region of mountains, steppes, and a large desert with rich oil and natural gas reserves, the region was once crossed by the northern Silk Road.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades PreK-6.

Music Arts Toolkit

Music Arts Toolkit. This web site provides K-12 teachers with high-quality teaching resources that bring the world of music into the classroom. You’ll find lesson plans, idea cards, glossaries, and many special features. The lesson plans are based on video segments taken from KET programs included in the Arts Toolkit: Music.


KET.

Grades: PreK-12.

A World of Music

A World of Music. A music world tour plus videos and activities to explore instruments, the element of music, songwriting, and more.


KET.

Grades: PreK-12.

Discovery Education: Songs

Discovery Education: Songs. Discovery Education has an extensive song library, which includes 1660 titles. Songs range in topic from science, to math, to economics, history and more!


Discovery Education.

PreK-12.

Reading Rainbow: Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin.

Reading Rainbow: Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin. Discover the places and faces waiting inside books. Host LeVar Burton shares stories of music and rhythm, including Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin by Lloyd Moss. The program visits the Julliard youth orchestra to see how musicians work together to create a unified yet diverse sound. LeVar practices with the cast of STOMP! and learns that rhythm is the basis for all music.


Discovery Education.

Grades K-2.

Weston Woods: Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin

Weston Woods: Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin. A lone trombone playing solo is joined by a trumpet in a duet until a French horn makes it a trio, and so on, as ten instruments, one by one, gather together for a joyous music performance. Music by Marvin Hamlisch.


Discovery Education.

Grades K-2.

Animated Hero Classics: Beethoven

Animated Hero Classics: Beethoven. This program looks at the life of Ludwig van Beethoven. A great composer who unfortunately lost his hearing.


Discovery Education.

Grades K-5.

Primary Music Appreciation: Carnival of the Animals

Primary Music Appreciation: Carnival of the Animals. Illustrations of this world-wide favorite reflect the spirit of the composer Camille Saint-Saëns's fantasies and unify the selection into an overall theme.


Discovery Education.

Grades K-5.

A First Look: Sound

A First Look: Sound. This program explains that sound is caused by something vibrating. It then describes how people use sound to communicate and how sound varies volume and pitch. The video also shows how musical instruments work and how students can make their own instruments out of simple materials.


Discovery Education.

Grades K-5.

Gullah Music: Secret Code

Gullah Music: Secret Code. Students will understand that music and material culture became a mode of covert communication between slaves. Aunt Pearlie Sue is our guide as students uncover hidden messages in the work songs enslaved Africans sang in the fields. And, some believe that the patterns sewn into quilts were designed as directions for navigating the Underground Railroad.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 3-5.

Chuck VanderChuck's Something Something Explosion

Chuck Vanderchuck's "Something Something" Explosion is designed to help children ages 6 to 9 understand music and music composition by teaching basic musical concepts and performance skills through the study of popular song styles from around the world.The main goals of this project are to teach children: instruments and their sounds, song structure, lyric writing, musical styles, and ear training. Styles covered include: blues, classical, country, hip hop, jazz, reggae, rock n' roll, and salsa.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 3-6.

Chuck Vanderchuck's Something Something Explosion: Quick Lessons

Chuck Vanderchuck's Something Something Explosion: Quick Lessons. Extend the learning of the Chuck Vanderchuck videos with audio-enhanced lessons that explore components of music training. Use the audio files in conjunction with the lesson plans. With these lesson plans, students will become familiar with the basic elements of melodic construction, create their own musical sounds with found instruments, create songs using lyrics, become more aware about different musical styles from around the world, and understand that music can be made with everyday objects. (Downloadable.)


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 3-6.

Chuck Vanderchuck's Something Something Explosion Road Trip Game

Chuck Vanderchuck's Something Something Explosion Road Trip Game. Identify different instruments that are characteristic of certain musical genres in a game-like format. "Chuck Vanderchuck's 'Something Something' Explosion" is designed to help children ages 6 to 9 understand music and music composition by teaching basic musical concepts and performance skills through the study of popular song styles from around the world.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 3-6.

One Minute Music Lesson

One Minute Music Lesson. People create musical performances all over the world. Students will watch a one-minute animation about the history of music.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 3-8.

Gullah Music

Gullah Music. This video segment describes the community of Sapelo Island located off the coast of Georgia. The original Gullah/Geechee people of Sapelo were enslaved there, but when slavery was abolished the land on the island was abandoned to the slaves. Sapelo Island's valuable land is now threatened as it is the only Gullah/Geechee island to successfully resist real estate development. Each year island residents hold a festival. In order to preserve and educate people outside Sapelo, they bring people to the island to teach them about Gullah/Geechee life and culture.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 4-12.

Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart: Hard Rock Women

Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart: Hard Rock Women. Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart discuss the role of women in rock music. Women Who Rock: Vision, Passion, Power highlights the flashpoints, the firsts, the best, the celebrated — and sometimes lesser-known women — who moved rock and roll music and American culture forward.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 6-12.

Native American Culture: Cherokee Singer

Native American Culture: Cherokee Singer. Cherokee singer Paula Nelson performs a learning song that teaches a greeting and farewell in Cherokee and then asks the audience to sing with her in a call and response conversation. In the second part of the segment, Nelson says that the Cherokee people are a “water people” and performs a song called “It’s Going to Rain.” Her performance was taped at the 2006 Festival of Native Peoples in Cherokee, N.C.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 6-12.

Can You Own a Sound? - Copyright Criminals

Can You Own a Sound? - Copyright Criminals. This Community Classroom educational module from Copyright Criminals teaches the basic foundations of copyright law and how the music industry began to respond legally to sampling as hip-hop grew in popularity in the 1990s. Paired with Lesson 2 of the curriculum. The film Copyright Criminals was a presentation of PBS Independent Lens.

PBS LearningMedia.
Grades 9-12.

Bluegrass Breakdown

Bluegrass Breakdown. Bluegrass was pioneered by Bill Monroe, a mandolin player in the 1930s, who built on the Old Time Music tradition. It was developed around the same time that African-American jazz musicians developed bebop, and some people considered it "white jazz." Unlike Old Time Music, where everyone was welcomed in the performing of the music, bluegrass showcased professional musicians possessing a high-level of skill and technique. Bluegrass relied on the advent of technology (microphones, radio and recordings) to gain popularity throughout the country. Bluegrass carried the sounds and subject matter of Old Time Music, but had the feel of something hard-driving and contemporary. This clip provides a glimpse at the impact of the banjo on Bluegrass style and history. Discussion questions are provided to support the video.


PBS LearningMedia.

Grades 9-12.