Aboriginal history and culture

Non-fiction

Aboriginal Australia & the Torres Strait Islands : guide to indigenous Australia

Sarina Singh

Aboriginal Australians : first nations of an ancient continent

Stephen Muecke and Adam Shoemaker

A is for aunty

Memories of growing up on an Aboriginal mission are brought to life in this alphabet picture book with a difference. It features accounts of possums as pets and Aunty Goldie who used zinc ointment for just about every ailment.


Elaine Russell

Art, history, place

A recognised art expert looks at the astonishing diversity of visual work done by Indigenous Australians today, while exploring the traditions and influences that shaped their work. Although much Indigenous art is part of an artistic movement over forty thousand years old, Indigenous artists also have a remarkable capacity to use new media, styles and subject matter in their work.


Christine Nicholls

Australia before British colonisation

Catherine Saunders

Bawoo stories

written by May L. O'Brien

Four wonderful traditional teaching stories of the Wongutha people are collected together here for the first time: Barn Barn Barlala, The Kangaroos Who Wanted to be People, How Crows Became Black, Why the Emu Can’t Fly.

Birrung : the secret friend

Jackie French


Birrung, a young indigenous girl, befriends orphaned Barney and his friend Elsie. Birrung is living with Mr Johnson, chaplain to the Australian colony in 1790, and his family. Generous in spirit, the Johnson family also take in Barney and Elsie who have only just been surviving on their meagre daily rations. Despite living with the Johnsons, Birrung's connection to her people remains strong, and when Mr and Mrs Johnson see how Barney's feeling for Birrung are growing, they gently explain that his friendship with a 'native' girl and all that she taught him about her language and lore must remain a secret - forever. Based on the true story of Birrung and the Johnsons.

Black diamonds : the Aboriginal and Islander Sports Hall of Fame

Colin & Paul Tatz

Boomerangs and Throwing Sticks

Alex Barlow

Boses ourselves: The story of Aboriginal self-government

In Bosses Ourselves: The Story of Aboriginal Self-government, read about the traditional importance to Aboriginal people of their senior men and women and how the arrival of European settlers disrupted forever the way aboriginal people organized their society and governed themselves.


Alex Barlow and Marji Hill

Bubbay : a Christmas adventure

Josie Wowolla Boyle


Bubbay lives in the outback spending his days protecting a herd of goats from dingoes. He sleeps in his swag under the stars and the only person he visits is Mrs Timms for chicken's eggs. One night, just before Christmas, Bubbay wishes for something he has never had. His friends, the stars hear him and, with the help of a talking Christmas tree, the magical Gubarlee and five desert animals, Bubbay begins a quest to make his dearest wish come true.

Bush holiday

Leonie Norrington


Auntie Doreen is taking the kids on a real bush holiday, like they wouldn't believe.

Charles Perkins and the freedom ride

Melanie Guile

Creatures of the rainforest : two artists explore Djabugay country

A celebration of Aboriginal culture, this handsome book is a visual delight with its attention to detail in beautiful reproductions of linoprints and acrylic paintings. Entries are laid out in alphabetical order, and each double page has two images of rainforest flora or fauna, with Aboriginal captions subtitled in English. A paragraph describes the topic, its growth patterns, habits, and uses. Notes regarding the interaction of the Djabugay people with the landscape are interesting and useful for Aboriginal Studies. The book strongly and enthusiastically depicts the natural environment of the Djabugay landscape.


Warren Brim, Anna Eglitis

Deadly Australians

Information about some deadly Australians, that is, some great Indigenous people who are successful, talented, outstanding and cool. They include Bronwyn Bancroft, Fabri Blacklock, Uncle Charles Moran, Darlene Johnson, Jimmy Little, Linda Burney and Charles Davidson who have achieved in art, politics, music and other fields.


by Rhonda Craven and James Wilson-Miller

Dirrangun

collected by Roland Robinson


Some people say that Dirrangun is a witch, that she's mean and cunning and Brings you all the mischief in the world. Others say that she's friendly. But she's a very old woman and She has long hair down to her knees. Dirrangun is well-known near Grafton and along the north coast of New South Wales. Both the Bunjalung and Githavul people speak of her and of her connection with local landmarks. She is a powerful woman. Dirrangun contains two stories - one told by Ethan Williams and one by Lucy Daley. It forms part of the oral storytelling tradition and is faithful to each storyteller's voice. these narratives originally appeared in the Nearest the White Man Gets, a group of stories and poems collected by Roland Robinson. Now illustrated by Bronwyn Bancroft, the woman, Dirrangun, takes on pictorial form. Powerful and emotional, Bronwyn's insight into the past draws the reader into a better understanding of the Bunjalung and Githavul stories.

Dreamtime moon : Aboriginal myths of the moon

Charles E. Hulley


In Aboriginal Australia, the creation of the world took place in the Dreamtime - an epoch when supernatural beings rose to create the world. The stories of Dreamtime are the foundations of all social and religious life. They recount the journeys of the primordial beings and show how the landscape was shaped, how fire was created, how plants, animals and humans were made, and how necessities such as spears and grinding stones were invented to help Aboriginal men and women with their daily lives. This book presents a rich collection from the Australian past, in which the author retells the stories of an ancient tradition and compares their underlying themes with a selection of myths and Moon lore from around the world. Some are children's stories and some are efforts to explain the natural world. Each story is illustrated by the paintings of the late Ainslie Roberts.

Gold for Cathy Freeman!

The story of Cathy Freeman winning gold at the Olympic games. Great photos and a full biography are included.


Karen Lau

Going bush

Nadia Wheatley and Ken Searle


In association with Al Zahra College, Arncliffe; Rissalah College, Lakemba; Arncliffe Public School; Arncliffe West Infants Public School; Athelstane Public School; Bexley Public School; Our Lady of Fatima, Kingsgrove; St Francis Xavier's, Arncliffe. Summary: As a group of children from different cultural backgrounds explore a small patch of inner-city bushland, they make all sorts of discoveries about the land they share and the things they have in common.

Growing up at Uluru, Australia

An introduction to the indigenous culture and natural history of Uluru. The story is a factual narrative that conveys the author's first hand experience of the communities.


Stan Breedon

Home of the Kadimakara people

Percy Trezise


A Dreaming story retold. Jadianta, his sister Lande and brother Jalmor are fishing when a storm blows their walpa out into Balanorga, the great lake. A gentler wind blows them on shore and they must journey back to their people, the Kadimakara..

Indigenous Australian cultures

Mary Colson


Indigenous Australian Culture covers a vast array of subjects on Indigenous Australian culture, from fine arts to ceremonies, from legends to the culture's global influence.

Insects

Wendy Notley


Insects is an adaptation of an Aunty Wendy's Mob song on the 'happy to be me' CD.

Jandamarra

Mark Greenwood


Set in the Kimberley region in north-west Australia, this is the story of a young warrior born to lead. To the settlers, he was an outlaw to be hunted. To the Bunuba, he was a courageous defender of his country. This story of conflict and divided loyalties gives a unique insight into an extraordinary man and a tragic but important part of Australia's history.

Jirrbal : rainforest Dreamtime stories

Maisie (Yarrcali) Barlow


Aboriginal dreaming stories of the Jirrbal people. Contains factual narratives about the author's life and the rainforests of North Queensland. Traditional language words of the Jirrbal people are included.

Kicking goals with Goodsey and magic

Anita Heiss, Adam Goodes, Mickey O'Loughlin


Australian Football League (AFL) legends, Adam Goodes and Michael O'Loughlin, are blood brothers and great mates. They are also two of the best footballers ever to play for the Sydney Swans. Between them, they played over six hundred and fifty games, and kicked over nine hundred goals. Find out what Goodesy and Magic were like when they were kids, what kind of scrapes they got into at school, and what it was like to go from being normal teenagers to AFL superstars.

Knockabout cricket

Neridah McMullin


A story of sporting legend - Johnny Mullagh. Summary: In the 1890s at Pine Hills station, a tall Aboriginal boy steps out from the phalaris grass and joins a game of cricket. His name was 'Unaarramin' or Johnny Mullagh from Mullagh Station. Fifteen years before Test Cricket began, Johnny Mullagh became a true sporting legend, his feats making him one of Australia's first international cricket stars. But Johnny was also a man caught between two worlds, facing racism and discrimination his entire life. Knockabout Cricket is a fictional account of how Johnny Mullagh may have come to play cricket, told from the perspective of a squatter's son. It is supported by historical facts about Knockabout Cricket and Johnny's life from historical documents and newspaper clippings.

Land of the Brolga people

Percy Trezise


The children of the Kadimakara have faced starvation and death, but there are more dangers ahead ... Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor rescued Wongabel from the Snake Men. they have travelled safely through the Land of the Kangaroo People to deliver Wongabel safely home to her people. the three Kadimakara children stay with the Brolga People, resting and playing games, before they take up their journey once more. As they travel through the Land of the Barramundi People, Jadianta points out the great, red sandstone mountain called Narabullgan which was made by Goorialla the Rainbow Serpent as he travelled north in Dreamtime. Jadianta tells them the story of the mountain and the Goanna Brothers. As they make camp for the night, a huge Wanambi snake attacks, but Jadianta spears it just in time. As they go to sleep a large comet comes from the south and Jadianta says it is Goorialla, lighting the way to their home in the north.

Land of the Dingo people

Percy Trezise


Three Kadimakara children are washed up in the land of the Dingo People. the Dingo People want to help them find their way home and lead Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor to the river. Suddenly a crocodile rears up and takes one of the Dingo children. Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor survive and are now in the land of the Magpie Goose. It has been suggested by scientists that during the Ice Age, the Gulf of Carpentaria dried up forming a land bridge between Australia and New Guinea. Aboriginal oral history also recalls a huge shallow lake; the aquatic life, people and events forming part of the legends. Percy trezise has told many stories about these legends.

Land of the Emu people

Percy Trezise


Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor, children of the Kadimakara People, are lost ?wept away from their home by a fierce storm. the children survived the unfamiliar surroundings of the friendly Dingo People, but now, in the land of the Magpie Goose People, they face giant goannas and marsupial lions. Will Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor ever see their family again? Journey of the Great Lake is a beautifully illustrated series that follows the journey of three children, providing a unique picture of Australia during this ancient time. Read the story of Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor, then follow their path as they travel to find their way home on the specially provided poster-sized map included with the book.

Land of the Kangaroo people

Percy Trezise


Jadianta, Lande and Jalmore, children of the Kadimakara People, are lost ?wept away from their home by a fierce storm. the children survived the unfamiliar surroundings of the friendly Dingo People but now, in the land of the Magpie Goose People, they face giant goannas and marsupial lions. Will Jadianta, Lande and Jalmore ever see their family again? Journey of the Great Lake is a beautifully illustrated series which follows the journey of three children, providing a unique picture of Australia during this ancient time. Read the story of Jadianta, Lande and Jalmore, then follow their path as they travel to find their way home on the specially provided poster-sized map included with the book.

Land of the Magpie Goose people

Percy Trezise


Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor, children of the Kadimakara People, are lost - swept away from their home by a fierce storm. the children survived the unfamiliar surroundings of the friendly Dingo People, but now, in the Land of the Magpie Goose People, they face giant goannas and marsupial lions. Will Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor ever see their family again? Journey of the Great Lake is a beautifully illustrated series which follows the journey of three children, providing a unique picture of Australia during this ancient time. Read the story of Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor, then follow their path as they travel to find their way home on the specially provided poster-sized map included with the book.

Land of the Snake people

Percy Trezise


Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor are three children of the Kadimakara People who were caught in a storm and stranded across the great lake, Balanorga. Now they are trying to find their way home and in this part of the series, they are in the land of the Snake people.

Lane, the two Emu girls, and Wongabel of the Woomera people escape from the Snake Men, but now need to safely cross the Pungalunga lands. The Emu people have warned that the Pungalunga people are cannibals, so Jadianta sets about making a bullroarer with a local healer, in an attempt to scare them off. This journey shows what a courageous leader Jadianta is, and again highlights the cleverness of Lasca the Dingo.

'Journey of the Great Lake' is a beautifully illustrated series which follows the journey of three children, providing a unique picture of Australia during this ancient time. Read the story of Jadianta, Lande and Jalmor, then follow their path as they travel to find their way home on the specially provided poster-sized map included with the book.

Minah : a poem in four parts

collected by Roland Robinson


Whenever I used to see one of those old fellers going off with a spear for murrung -- fish -- I'd watch him. I'd run after him. I was only a little feller but I had a sense to follow and learn how to do all those things." Not everyone has someone to look up to and learn from in their life. But for this little boy, Uncle Abraham is that special person. This story about Minah, Uncle Abraham, shows how the passing down of knowledge can help keep memory alive.

Nginingawila ngirramini : our story

Tiwi College Alalinguwi Jarrakarlinga.


In this collection of inspiring pieces, the girls share stories about their heroes, their sacred places and the happiest moments of their lives. With an introduction by Indigenous Literacy Foundation ambassador Dr Anita Heiss and author Pamela Freeman, Nginingawila Ngirramini was created in Sydney as part of the ILF s Create Initiative, a workshop program to improve literacy.

The little red yellow black book : an introduction to indigenous Australia

Concise, current, easy to read, relevant and diverse, this resource provides support for a range of topics across the curriculum on Indigenous history and contemporary culture.


Bruce Pascoe

The making of the Narran Lake

A dreaming story as told by Ted Fields ; with illustrations by David O'Neill

Manduwuy Yunupingu

The story of a respected indigenous role model, Mandawuy Yunupingu, who has been a school principal and a rock star. Includes great photos, a glossary and a personal profile.


Beth Hall

Maralinga : the Anangu story

In words and pictures, Yalata and Oak Valley community members, with author Christobel Mattingley, describe what happened in the Maralinga Tjarutja lands of South Australia, before the bombs and after.


Yalata and Oak Valley Communities, with Christobel Mattingley

The mighty Murray

Australia's greatest river system now and then, with many stories about the people who lived on or in the Murray Valley. Includes archaeological finds, Aboriginal legends, riverboat traders and dam engineers.


written and illustrated by John Nicholson

Mum Shirl

The story of Mum Shirl, an Australian Indigenous woman, who unselfishly helped Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people. Includes great photographs, newspaper clippings and a biography.


Karen Lau

My Mob: The story of Aboriginal family life

In My Mob: The Story of Aboriginal Family Life, read about traditional Aboriginal concepts of family life, society, learning and school, and initiation.


Alex Barlow and Marji Hill

Mythology

Sandra Cahir


The dreamtime, Storytelling, The rainbow serpent, the story of the Akurra serpent, Yowrgurraa, Sparrowhawk and Dolphin, Kungkarangkalpa, the Pleiades, Kuniya woman and Liru men at Uluru, Bunjil the eaglehawk, Mityan the moon, How crow stole fire.

Nginingawila ngirramini : our story

Tiwi College Alalinguwi Jarrakarlinga


In this collection of inspiring pieces, the girls share stories about their heroes, their sacred places and the happiest moments of their lives. With an introduction by Indigenous Literacy Foundation ambassador Dr Anita Heiss and author Pamela Freeman, Nginingawila Ngirramini was created in Sydney as part of the ILF s Create Initiative, a workshop program to improve literacy

Our world : Bardi Jaawi : life at Ardiyooloon

Our world looks into the lives of children of a remote Indigenous community. The children carry on the culture of the Bardi Jaawi people as they build fish traps, make spears and boomerangs, hunt crabs, turtles and dugong, learn traditional dances and share traditional stories.


One Arm Point Remote Community School

Papunya School book : of country and history

his story offers a viewpoint about Australia, not often told. It is an account of specific events that have impacted upon the Anangu people, from five different language groups, who came to live together at Papunya. From first contact, through to the arrival of missionaries, to Land Rights, this story has many facets and layers that will unravel as the true story is told. Other topics include: Stolen Generations; health; resistance; massacres; and the Assimilation Policy. It is about two way learning: the Anangu way and the Western way. Aboriginal language (Anungu) is used throughout the text and explained in the glossary. A useful and precise timeline is captured on each double page with the inclusion of an overall timeline that extends into three pages. A powerful, varied collection of children's illustrations and historical photographs have been used to highlight the reality of events that took place. Individual recollections by community members have been used to combine real life experiences with facts about specific events. This is an inspirational attempt to tell it as it was, with passion and dignity.


produced by staff and students at Papunya School ; written text Nadia Wheatley


YCPS- 1 copy

BCPS- 1 copy

Playground : listening to stories from country and from inside the heart

ead the true stories about the childhood of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, compiled from memoirs and oral histories. Find out about getting bush tucker, going fishing, taking part in ceremony, playing games and having fun. The warmth of home, the love of family and the strength of community shine through every story. Eighty Elders, both past and present, have contributed their words or artwork.


compiled by Nadia Wheatley ; illustration and design, Ken Searle

Remembering Lionsville

Bronwyn Bancroft


Renowned artist Bronwyn Bancroft tells her inspiring story of growing up in country New South Wales. Come with me to my family's old house in Lionsville. It's full of memories. It's a special place. Uncle Pat calls it a secret place. We played in that old tin cubby, swam in the creek with the catfish, and fell asleep to the ribbip of frogs at night. And around the red cedar table we listened to the old people's stories. We learned a lot that way.

Sharing our cultures: The story of Aboriginal culture

n this book, the story of Aboriginal culture, then and now, is told. Read about ancient Aboriginal cultures and how culture influences identity. Learn about the ways in which Aboriginal cultures were forced to change when European settlers came to Australia and about cultural theft and how, now, culture is shared with respect and enjoyed by everyone.


Alex Barlow and Marji Hill

Side by side

In this sequel to his award-winning "Too Many Captain Cooks", Alan Tucker uses colourful narrative paintings and individual case histories to show the many ways in which Aboriginal people and white settlers co-existed during the 19th century, a time of great social change.


Alan Tucker

Sister heart

Sally Morgan


Annie, young Aboriginal girl, is taken from her family in the north of Australia and sent to an institution in the distant south. Away from everything she knows and everyone she loves, Annie must make a new life in a strange world. A sister-friend brings fresh hope.

Songlines and Stone axes

Magical pearl-shell pendants, greenstone axe-heads, belts made of human hair, outriggers for canoes, songs and dances, body paint, feathers, extra strong glue, cloaks made of 80 possum skins sewn with kangaroo sinew. These and hundreds of other items were traded around Australia before white settlement. Some were carried on foot over huge distances, through many lands and languages. When food was plentiful, several groups might gather for ceremonies and to swap goods at large markets. All this happened without money - until the Macassans and then the Europeans arrived.

In this groundbreaking book, the first of a series, award-winning author John Nicholson describes the fascinating networks of trade and ceremonial exchange in pre-European Australia.


John Nicholson

Stories from country : my pony Hooky and other tales

Bob Randall and Susan Haworth

Stories from the billabong

Retold by James Vance Marshall


Ten of Australia's ancient aboriginal legends, authentically and elegantly retold and illustrated by one of the most well-known artists working in the tradition. Discover how Great Mother Snake created and peopled the world with plants and creatures, what makes Frogs croak, why Kangaroo has a pouch, and just what it is that makes Platypus so special in this impressive collection of illustrated aboriginal legends. With stunning vibrant artwork from aboriginal artist and storyteller Francis Firebrace, whose distinctive, colourful work is known throughout Australia and beyond.

Stories of the stolen generations

includes: Margaret Tucker -- Elsie Roughsey -- Lowitja O'Donoghue -- Bob Randall -- Doris Pilkington Garimara -- Archie Roach -- Bringing them home.


by Marji Hill

Stradbroke dreamtime

Oodgeroo


The two halves of this book combine to bring together a collection of Dreaming stories and stories reminiscent of the author's childhood on Stradbroke Island.

The first fleet and the colony's early years

Catherine Saunders

The girl from the Great Sandy Desert

Jukuna Mona Chuguna and Pat Lowe


Twenty short stories that tell the story of Mana, a young Walmajarri girl growing up in the Great Sandy Desert. The harshness of the landscape, the importance of water, how hunting was carried out, the complexity of family relationships and the obligations of kinship are captured at a time before European settlement dramatically changed the traditional way of life. Includes a Walmajarri pronunciation guide and language glossary.

The whalers

Collected by Roland Robinson ;

The owl people

Percy Trezise


Retells the Aboriginal legend that explains how a monster dog belonging to the old mopoke woman, became the small dingo that has since been the Aborigines' friend and helper.

They took the children

In the past, thousands of Aboriginal children were forcibly removed from their parents as part of Australian government policies over many decades. Families and communities were fractured and torn apart by those policies.


by David Hollinsworth

The unlikely story of Bennelong and Phillip

written by Michael Sedunary


An important and intriguing tale of an extraordinary friendship between two unlikely characters, Captain Arthur Phillip and the Aboriginal, Bennelong, which remains largely unknown. The background of the first settlement in Australia heightens the polarity between the two worlds of the traditional Aboriginal culture and values, and European culture and values.

Vincent Lingiari and the Wave Hill Walkout

Melanie Guile ; with graphic pages illustrated by Chris Burns

Welcome to country

welcome words by Aunty Joy Murphy ; with illustrations by Lisa Kennedy


Welcome to the traditional lands of the Wurundjeri People. We are part of this land and the land is part of us. This is where we come from. Aunty Joy Wandin Murphy is a most respected senior Wurundjeri elder of the Kulin alliance. This is a very accessible welcome that introduces and gives meaning and explanation within the text to the customs and symbols of Indigenous Australia. Aboriginal communities across Australia have boundaries that are defined by mountain ranges and waterways. Traditionally, to cross these boundaries or enter community country you needed permission from the neighbouring community. When this permission was granted the ceremony now called Welcome to Country took place. Each community had its own way of welcoming to country, and they still do today

When I was little, like you

A precious recount of growing up in the early days of the Papunya settlement in central Australia. The author tells about going bush with her family and learning about her culture and way of life.


Mary Malbunka

Yirawala artist and man

Monograph on a notable Aboriginal artist and ceremonial elder of his tribe in western Arnhem Land.


Sandra le Brun Holmes

You and Me Living Together: The story of Aboriginal Land Rights

Alex Barlow and Marji Hill