this and that

for staff november 2015

A Happier Morning in the Paris Metro

wellness resources

Understanding and Adjusting to Change

Presented by: Andy Bellamy, Med., CCC

November 17, 4:00-5:30

I am sure if you pay the $10.00 you would be welcome. The following Wellness session is offered to all SD57 employees. The session will be held at the Van Bien Training and Development Centre, and a $10 fee will be collected.


Employee and Family Assistance Program for Ecole FrancoNord

Fseap.bc.ca * free and confidential will refer to counsellor in PG

1 800 667 0993 http://www.fseap.bc.ca/fr/


Walmsley Counselling

sd57 employee assistance program

Personal, online and email 100.00 per hour for those not with sd57

250 564 1000 http://walmsley.ca/


Family Doctor

Support, assessment and possible referral to a local Mental Health agency for adults


HealthLink BC

Call 811 to talk to a registered nurse or pharmacist


Here to Help

bc website, email and phone

Coping with mental health crises and emergencieshttp://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/lang/french/


Canadian Mental Health Association

BC Division

Program – Bounce Back : Reclaim Your Health

DVD, workbooks, phone support https://www.cmha.bc.ca/


Drop in Meditation

Tuesdays, 7 :15 – 8 :45

Chinook Yoga Studio

320 Vancouver Street

facilitated by : Sarah Dowling, SD speech pathologist, buddhist


Starling Minds – BCTF wellness program free to teachers

https://www.bctf.ca/SalaryAndBenefits.aspx?id=38267


Practical Tips to Coping with Life

http://blogs.psychcentral.com/anger/2015/09/stress-management-practical-tips-to-coping-with-life/


Linda Campbell 250 563 1371, 250 961 9260


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Stress Management: Practical Tips to Coping with Life

By Aaron Karmin ~ 1 min read


Find someone you trust. Talk with a family member or close friend about your experience. Contact a friend and have someone stay with you for a few hours or a day. Don’t carry this burden alone; share it with those who care about you. Talking about the stressful event will help you recover more quickly.


Give yourself permission to feel what you are feeling. Express your feelings as they arise. Take time to cry if needed. Don’t fight any recurring thoughts or memories of the stressful event – these are natural and will diminish over time.


Take care of yourself. Get enough rest and eat regularly. If you are irritable or tense from lack of sleep or if you are not eating correctly, you will have less ability to deal with a stressful situation.


Make as many daily decisions as possible. This will give you a feeling of control over your life. Know your limits. If the problem is beyond your control and cannot be changed, don’t fight the situation.


Practice relaxation and meditation. Create a quiet scene. You can’t always run away, but you can hold a vision in your mind – a quiet scene or walking along the beach can temporarily take you out of the turmoil of a stressful situation.

Play soft background music. At home and in your office or car, provide a soothing alternative to the noise of the office, telephones, or traffic.


Take one thing at a time. For people under stress, an ordinary workload can sometimes seem unbearable. The load looks so great that it becomes painful to tackle any part of it. When this happens, remember that it is a temporary condition and that you can work your way out of it . . . one step at a time.


Allow time for a task. This will help reduce some of your self-imposed time pressure. If you normally plan half an hour to get a job done by rushing through it, schedule forty-five minutes or an hour so you can do the job more deliberately and thoughtfully. This can only improve your quality of work. Give your best effort, but don’t take yourself to task of you can’t achieve the impossible.


Spruce up your surroundings. Keep a beautiful bouquet of flowers at home or in the office. Surround yourself with plants that you especially like. Make your environment one you enjoy.

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de mme linda


then for over a week had brain fog, anxiety, worry, and stomach aches. I remember a stress scale I once saw, where moving is #3 on the scale, right below death and divorce! So trying out a few of the suggestions below has been helpful.