Bulimia

Kyla, Makala, Cole

What Bulimia is?

Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by frequent episodes of binge eating, followed by frantic efforts to avoid gaining weight.

Physical signs and symptoms of bulimia

Calluses or scars on the knuckles or hands from sticking fingers down the throat to induce vomiting.
  • Puffy “chipmunk” cheeks caused by repeated vomiting.
  • Not underweight – Men and women with bulimia are usually normal weight or slightly overweight. Being underweight while purging might indicate a purging type of anorexia.
  • Frequent fluctuations in weight – Weight may fluctuate by 10 pounds or more due to alternating episodes of bingeing and purging.
  • Effects of bulimia

    • Weight gain
    • Abdominal pain, bloating
    • Swelling of the hands and feet
    • Chronic sore throat, hoarseness
    • Broken blood vessels in the eyes
    • Swollen cheeks and salivary glands
    • Weakness and dizziness
    • Tooth decay and mouth sores
    • Acid reflux or ulcers
    • Ruptured stomach or esophagus
    • Chronic constipation from laxative abuse

    Bulimia causes and risk factors

    Poor body image: Our culture’s emphasis on thinness and beauty can lead to body dissatisfaction, particularly in young women bombarded with media images of an unrealistic physical ideal.
  • Low self-esteem: Women or men who think of themselves as useless, worthless, and unattractive are at risk for bulimia. Things that can contribute to low self-esteem include depression, perfectionism, childhood abuse, and a critical home environment.
  • Major life changes: Bulimia is often triggered by stressful changes or transitions, such as the physical changes of puberty, going away to college, or the breakup of a relationship. Binging and purging may be a negative way to cope with the stress.
  • Appearance-oriented professions or activities: People who face tremendous image pressure are vulnerable to developing bulimia. Those at risk include ballet dancers, models, gymnasts, wrestlers, runners, and actors.
  • Steps to bulimia recovery

    Admit you have a problem. Up until now, you’ve been invested in the idea that life will be better—that you’ll finally feel good—if you lose more weight and control what you eat. The first step in bulimia recovery is admitting that your relationship to food is distorted and out of control.
  • Talk to someone. It can be hard to talk about what you’re going through, especially if you’ve kept your bulimia a secret for a long time. You may be ashamed, ambivalent, or afraid of what others will think. But it’s important to understand that you’re not alone. Find a good listener—someone who will support you as you try to get better.
  • Stay away from people, places, and activities that trigger the temptation to binge or purge. You may need to avoid looking at fashion or fitness magazines, spend less time with friends who constantly diet and talk about losing weight, and stay away from weight loss web sites and “pro-mia” sites that promote bulimia.
  • Seek professional help. The advice and support of trained eating disorder professionals can help you regain your health, learn to eat normally again, and develop healthier attitudes about food and your body.
  • Organizations that can help with Bulimia

    Call the National Eating Disorders Association’s toll-free hotline at 1-800-931-2237 for free referrals, information, and advice.
    Bulimia - Dr Phil