The Buried Years

Hiram ladd spencer

Group Members:

Floribel Gonzalez

Alexia McWilliams-Harrison

Deonte Daniels

The Buried Years Sonnet

The twilight shadows creep along the wall,

Without, the sobbing of the wind I hear,

And from the vine-clad elm that marks the mere

The ivy leaves in crimson eddies fall.

Deeper and deeper grow the shades of night,

And, gazing in the fire, to me appears

The form of one departed with the years--

The buried years of hope, and faith and light.

"Oh that those lips had language"--would they tell

The old, old story of the bygone days--

Ere on our heart the blighting shadow fell,

And we henceforward followed parted ways?

I ask, but as I ask the embers die--

The vision fades--and answer none have I.


By: Hiram ladd spencer

Summarization

This poem is about someone who is sitting near a fire and notices that it is becoming dark because he sees the “twilight shadows creep along the wall”. He then starts to gaze into the fire and starts to notice a “form of one departed with the years”. This form could be someone he lost by death or after a breakup. He thinks that if only that shadow could talk then it would tell of story of the past of those “buried years”. He comes to his senses and realizes it doesn’t matter because they have gone their own ways and as the embers die, so does his vision. In the end he has no answers.

Big image

Tone

The tone of this story is Reminiscent. Hiram ladd spencer states "And, gazing in the fire, to me appearsThe form of one departed with the years." This "form" is reminding him of his past years.

Figurative Language

"The twilight shadows creep along the wall", " the sobbing of the wind" are examples of personification because it gives twilight shadows and the wind human like qualities.


"And, gazing in the fire, to me appears the form of one" is an example of imagery because Hiram can imagine a figure being formed into fire.



Rhyme Sceme

A: wall

B: hear

B: mere

A: fall

C: night

B: appears

B: years

C: light

D: tell

E: days

D: fell

E: ways

F: die

F: I

Alliteration

Without, the sobbing of the wind I hear,

And from the vine-clad elm that marks the mere

"Oh that those lips had language"--would they tell

And we henceforward followed parted ways?

I ask, but as I ask the embers die--

The vision fades--and answer none have I.

Theme

The theme of this Sonnet is that even when we reflect deeply on stuff and try to imagine how it all happened in the end we have no answers. “Deeper and deeper grow the shades of night” meaning we think about it very hard. “The buried years of hope, faith, and light” lets us know that we always think if there had been a better solution to a past problem. “The vision fades—and answers none have I” lets us know that sometimes what happened leaves us with questions that have no answers but we should just keep moving forward.