Exercise Design Lab

By: Joelle Carrington, Joe Krenek, and Drew Kirk 4th period

How does exercise affect heart rate?

Will the type of exercise cause a change in the results?

After exercise, how will it take for the person's heart rate to return to normal?

What did you do? Why did you set up your experiment this way?

We decided as a group that a good and simple exercise to do was jogging in place to change your heart rate. I first took Joe and Drew's resting heart rate for 30 seconds and multiplied it by two to get the accurate resting heart rate. Then Person A, who was Joe did jogging in place for 30 seconds and then we timed it for another 30 seconds to get his heart rate by multiplying it by two after his exercise for 3 trials. Joe's average heart rate was 86.6 repeating and it took him about 75 seconds for his heart rate to go back to normal. Then we moved onto Person B, which was Drew who also did jogging in place for 30 seconds. After his exercise we timed him for 30 seconds to get his heart rate by multiplying it by two for all 3 trials. Drew's average heart rate was 92.6 repeating and it took about 50 seconds for Drew's heart rate to go back to normal. We then compared the data between Joe and Drew and discovered that Person B (Drew) heart was higher than Person A (Joe) heart rate. We finally came to a conclusion that our hypothesis was incorrect.

Hypothesis:

While Person A is jogging in place the heart rate will be higher than Person B jogging in place heart rate, and the resting heart rate will take 45 sedonds to go back to normal.

Variables:

Independent Variable- exercise activity


Dependent Variable- heart rate of each person

Control:

Resting heart rate❤️

Constants:

- the amount of time doing the exercise


- amount of time of the person's heart rate


- the exercise activity

Data Tables:

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Conclusion:

While Person A is jogging in place the heart rate will be higher than Person B jogging in place heart rate, and the resting heart rate will take 45 sedonds to go back to normal. Based on the data, the hypothesis is wrong because Person B ran faster than Person A causing Person B heart rate to be higher. As shown in the data table, after taking 3 trials of Person A and Person B resting heart rate while laying down. Person A resting heart rate on average was 61.3 BPM and Person B resting heart rate on average was 57.3 BPM. So clearly Person A resting heart rate is faster than Person B resting heart rate. After Person A finished jogging in place for the first trial it's heart rate was 102 BPM and it took 1 minute and 30 seconds to go back to normal. Then for the second trial, Person A heart rate was 60 BPM so about its average and it took 0 seconds for the heart rate to go back to normal because Person A slowed down on running. Finally for the third trial, Person A heart rate was 98 BPM and took one minute to go back to normal because it sped it up. After calculating Person A average heart rate for jogging in place was 86.6 and it took about 75 seconds to go back to normal. While Person A was resting, Person B did the exercise activity. Person B jogged in place for 30 seconds and the first trial it's heart rate was 98 BPM and it took one minute for the heart rate to go back to normal. Then for the second trial of Person B jogging in place it's heart rate was 80 BPM because it slowed it down and it took one minute for the heart rate to go back to normal. Finally on the last trial, Person B heart rate was 100 BPM because it sped it up and it took 30 seconds for the heart rate to go back to normal. After calculation again Person B average heart rate for jogging in place it was 92.6 and it took about 50 seconds to go back to normal. When the exercise trials were done, the data was compared between the two and Person B ended up having a higher heart rate on average and the time it took to go back to normal than Person A. So the hypothesis was incorrect. In the data, it's a fact that Person B heart rate was higher than Person A heart rate. Why was Person B heart rate higher than Person A? Person B jogged in place faster. It was observed by picking up the feet while jogging in place, then it will jog faster and have a higher heart rate. As shown in the picture Person B was picking up the feet off the ground.

Bibliography:

Glencoe/McGraw'Hill Biology. "The Dynamics of Life". Lab handbook. Coppell High School. Coppell, Texas. March 16, 2014. Print.