OES Summer Tips!

Reading 20 minutes a day can help prevent the "summer slide"

The Facts!

Studies show that students who read as few as six books over the summer maintain the level of reading skills they achieved during the school year. When students read 10 to 20 books, they will actually make reading GAINS! We want to see these gains, so we are offering resources to help open up a world of summer reading for your child.

Finding a Book

Summer is a time to read for pleasure. Allow your child to revisit favorites or explore new books that may be below their lexile level. Also, consider reading books aloud that are above their level. And don't forget to encourage students to read books that are "just right". Using their guided reading or lexile level, you can find "just right" titles at the websites below. Or maybe even enter the world of different genres such as science fiction, poetry, biographies, and historical fiction.

CMS Summer Learning Blitz


  • Our students have the opportunity to participate in a Summer Learning Blitz. This challenge is designed to encourage our students to engage in learning during the summer months using district provided digital tools that are available anywhere, anytime. For every hour students spend on one of three digital tools (COMPASS Learning, RAZ KIDS, DREAMBOX) students will have their name entered into the drawing for AMAZING prizes. For more information on this challenge and these digital tools visit: http://www.cms.k12.nc.us/Pages/summerblitz.aspx.

  • Community Reading Opportunities

    Tutoring Opportunities

    Check out The Public Libraries of Mecklenburg County for free reading programs and tutoring. Registration may be required. For more info... www.cmlibrary.org

    Beatties Ford Public Library

    • Reading Buddies: Increase reading confidence, fluency, and comprehension by reading with a teen volunteer during a 15 or 30 minute 1 on 1 session.
    • Family Storytime: Bring your whole family out to enjoy stories, songs, and movement activities that support early literacy skill development and help foster a love of books and reading in your child. Parents and caregivers are encouraged to participate.
    • Library e-books: 1-on-1 Support Session: Call 704-416-3000 to book a 30-minute individual training session on borrowing e-books for your e-reader, tablet, smartphone or laptop. Bring your device; we’ll show you how to find, check out and download books from our digital collection.


    Mountain Island Public Library
    • Reading Buddies: Increase reading confidence, fluency, and comprehension by reading with a teen volunteer during a 15 or 30 minute 1 on 1 session.
    • Computer Basics for Kids:Get a basic overview of computer terms and concepts in this class for ages 8-12. Learn the basic parts of a computer and how to use them. Also includes a basic introduction to the Windows Operating System.

    One Access


    • ONE Access is a collaboration between Charlotte Mecklenburg Library and Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools.

    • CMS students can now use their Student ID number to access and check out CML resources.

    • Their CMS Student ID number is their library account number. The PIN is the last 4 digits of the Student ID.​

    Oakdale's Summer Reading Challenge!

    Students who complete their Summer Bridge Book, complete the 30 Book Challenge (attached), or bring in evidence of completing one of the above reading programs will be rewarded with a free Kona Ice at Open House! Simply bring your completed Bridge Book, completed 30 Book Challenge, or other evidence of summer reading to Open House on August 24th, 2017 and drop by the Summer Reading Challenge table! GO EAGLES!

    Kindergarten & First Grade Math Tips

    • Kindergarteners and First Graders are still building their number sense. They can count anything and everything. This should go beyond rote counting. They need to count objects so that they are able to conserve what quantities look like with different objects. They can also begin building place value skills by making groups of tens and leftover ones. (34 beans= 3 groups of ten and 4 ones leftover)
    • While making lunch- ask your child if they want their lunch cut in halves or fourths. Cutting items into fair shares builds a great foundation for fractions.
    • Practice simple addition and subtraction. As dinner is being prepared, count a group of carrots and a group of cucumbers to see how many there are altogether. Then eat them to see how many are left after each one is consumed. There are addition and subtraction problems all around you.
    • Fluency practice is important! Fluency is defined by efficiency, flexibility, and accuracy. It is important for students to be able to break numbers up and put them back together fluently. Practice fluency with numbers to 10. Here are two fun activities:
    1. Coin Toss- Pick a number to work on (example 6). Get 6 pennies and put them in a cup. Shake the cup and spill them on the table. Count the number of heads and tails and record as a number sentence (Heads + Tails = 6) and repeat.
    2. Cave Game- Pick a number to work on (example 7). Count out 7 beans. Hide four under the cave (cup or bowl), leave 3 out. Your child figures out how many are hiding in the cave and writes a number sentence. (Example 4+3=7 or 7-4=3 or 7-3=4) The goal is to get your child to use related combinations and know how to decompose 7 into parts.

    Second & Third Grade Math Tips

    • Second and Third Graders need to build place value skills. Use dried beans to make bean sticks. Glue 10 beans on a popsicle stick to make a ten. Then use the bean stick as tens and the loose beans as ones to make numbers like 25, 64 or 41. Play race to 100 by starting with a number, roll a dice, add that many beans to your number. Practice trading 10 single beans for one ten bean stick. You can play the opposite and subtract from 100 to get to 0 as well. This builds place value and number sense.
    • Make word problems out of everyday situations. For example, while at the pool, estimate how many people are in and around the pool. About how many people are at the pool altogether?
    • Understanding fractions as fair shares/equal groups is important. Practice cutting lunch and dinner items into halves, fourths, and thirds. As you eat, talk about the fractional part that has been eaten as well as the part that is left. Build the foundation that as you cut something into more parts the pieces get smaller (example 1/8 is smaller than 1/4).
    • Measuring fun- It is a great time for your child to help you in the kitchen. They can help you follow recipes and measure out ingredients.
    • Be creative with graphing. Students can graph the foods that they eat during the week. They can graph the weather, temperature or their daily activities each day (video game time, TV time, reading time...).

    Fourth & Fifth Grade Math Tips

    • Practice multiplication facts. It makes multi-digit multiplication and division much easier to do when they know their multiplication facts to 12. To help with this make flash cards and array cards. Array cards are the type of grid that illustrates the multiplication fact. For example: The array card for 3X5=15 would be a grid with 3 squares going down and five squares going across. There would be a total of 15 squares on the card.
    • Measuring fun- It is a great time for your child to help you in the kitchen. They can help you follow recipes and measure out ingredients. You can create word problems too..I am making 3 batches of brownies. Each batch calls for 2/3 of a cup of flour. How many cups of flour do I need for all 3 batches?
    • Make word problems out of everyday situations. For example: Forty people are attending our Fourth of July picnic. The forks came in packages of 12. How many packages do I need to buy?
    • Be creative with graphing. Students can graph the foods that they eat during the week. They can graph the weather, temperature or their daily activities each day (video game time, tV time, reading time...).