Shakers!!!

Shakers are not bread makers but they are pledge takers!

Summary

The shaker movement was popularized by an illiterate textile worker named Ann Lee. she was a charismatic woman who became involved with the Shakers in 1758 and spread their teachings, frequently incurring local hostility. The Shaker movement was particularly attractive to people who were drawn by the religious principles and also the fact that women enjoyed equal status with men within the community. Shakers practiced celibacy which means no marriage or sexual relations. Everyone was welcome to the Shaker community as long as he/she partake in the activities, which included celibacy,open confession of sins, common ownership of property, separation from the outside world, and a strong work ethic.

Causes

The Shaker religion began in 1758 and they spread-ed their teachings. By 1774 Anna Lee led a small group of Believers to America, they settled near Albany in upstate New York. When Anna Lee died in 1784, the Shaker community expanded to more than 1,000 converts. By the late 1800's the Shaker movement began to fall apart, the population began to age and decline. Today there is only one Shaker community left and only 8 members are remaining.

Goals and objectives of the movement

The goal of the Shaker movement was to attract large American families and they had to follow the religious principles, which included celibacy, open confession of sins, common ownership of property, separation from the outside world, and a strong work ethic. The Shakers were at the height of their popularity, with more than 4,000 Believers living in 16 communities in eight states. In the mid 1800's, with fewer families joining the ranks, the Shakers began absorbing hundreds of orphans, many of whom chose to remain in the community as adults.

Tactics and strategies

In the mid 1800's, with fewer families joining the ranks, the Shakers began absorbing hundreds of orphans, many of whom chose to remain in the community as adults. But in the late 1800's the movement fell apart members found themselves leaving the religion to be involved with the modern world. The 8 remaining Shakers tactics these days is to no longer turn their backs on the world as their predecessors did and they lecture at local schools, write a quarterly newsletter, maintain a website, and continue to accept newcomers.

Initial successes

The Shaker movement was founded in the industrial city of Manchester by James Wardley. The movement gained its most popularity when Ann Lee became involved with the Shakers. She spread-ed their teachings through out New York.
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Ann Lee

Ann Lee became involved with the Shakers in 1758 and spread their teachings.
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Key events

The Shakers are called the Shakers because of trembling and shaking that its worshipers engaged in during prayer. The Shakers did this dance in order to get rid of sin.

Reasons to contribute

People contributed because the Shakers developed communal living, productive labor, pacifism, and equality of sexes. One of the only movements at the time that gave women equal rights. It was also a fun way to get rid of sin by shaking it off. It also maintained economic freedom from external control.

Contribution incentives

Hannah Cohoon donated ($1,287) her life saving to the Shakers. Richard McNemar donated 100 dollars to the Sharkers. And lastly Issachar Bates donated 7 dollars to the Shakers.

Advertising

The Shakers lecture at local schools, write a quarterly newsletter, maintain a website, and continue to accept newcomers. They also have billboards that say "can't shake us off!"

Hashtag

#TheLonleyShakers

Contact us at 1-800-WeDidn'tRepopulateSoWeAllDied

Disclaimer

Don't donate to the Shakers they are a dying religion because they don't reproduce.
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Other Movements

Another movement at this time was the Mormons, the Mormons was the beginning of many currents of innovations in American religion.Mormonism reflected a belief in human perfectibility. This group emphasized structure of the family. The Mormons are still here to this day.