Sonnet 94

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

By: Marc Bertolino, Lakendra Farmer, and Allie McGee

"They That Have Power To Hurt and Will Do None"

They that have power to hurt and will do none,
That do not do the thing they most do show,
Who, moving others, are themselves as stone,
Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow,
They rightly do inherit heaven’s graces
And husband nature’s riches from expense;
They are the lords and owners of their faces,
Others but stewards of their excellence.
The summer’s flower is to the summer sweet,
Though to itself it only live and die,
But if that flower with base infection meet,
The basest weed outbraves his dignity:
For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;
Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds.

"ANALYSIS"

Summary

William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 94" is a very difficult poem to analyze; the first eight lines of the sonnet are devoted to the description of a certain magnificent, restrained person. The next four lines in the sonnet experience a remarkable shift, as the speaker turns from his description of those that “have pow’r to hurt and will do none” to a look at a metaphor of a flower in the summer. If a flower becomes sick, it looses its beauty and inner respect. When the loss of beauty takes place the author explains the worth of a person become slim to non. The author writes this sonnet to observe the behavior that determines the worth of a person or a thing: "For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds."

"For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds; Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds"

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Authors Tone

Shakespeare's tone in this sonnet is very misinterpreted throughout the story. When reading the beginning you catch yourself finding this sonnet to be "depressing" and a "lost love" subject. As the story continues Shakespeare's tone changes to more of a "teaching" "cautionary" subject warning others of the things that can happen. Shakespeare helps to influence the caution life needs to not get caught up in thee that may cause success to become failure. For example, the author uses a sentence consisting of "Others but stewards of their excellence." This sentence is a cautionary sentence telling you that people that don't have beauty and intelligence try to subside those hwo have beauty and success.

Figurative Language

"The Summers Flower"-- Metaphor

"Are Themselves as Stone"-- Personification/Simile

"Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow"-- Imagery

"The basest weed outbraves his dignity"-- Personification

"Though to itself it only live or die,"-- Hyperbole

"And husband nature's riches form expense;"-- Hyperbole

"Understanding Poetry"

"That do not do the thing they most do show,"-- Assonance

"For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;"-- Assonance

"Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds."-- Assonance


*"No Alliteration Found"*



Rhyme Scheme:


None-A

Show-B

Stone-A

Slow-A

Graces-C

Expense-D

Faces-C

Excellence-D

Sweet-E

Die-F

Meet-E

Dignity-F

Deeds-G

Weeds-G

Theme Statement

The theme of William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 94" illustrates the powerful of the people tend to overuse there power resulting in failure of all hard work, but those smart ones that have "power to hurt" don't use it so they stand successful. Shakespeare annotates this using lines such as "For sweetest things turn sourest by their deeds;." and "Lilies that fester smell far worse than weeds." These quotes form his sonnet help represent the theme of abusing your power resulting in failure.