archaeologist

by: Roman Johnson

5 Tasks/Job duties to do

  • Study objects and structures recovered by excavation to identify, date, and authenticate them and to interpret their significance.
  • Research, survey, or assess sites of past societies and cultures in search of answers to specific research questions.
  • Write, present, and publish reports that record site history, methodology, and artifact analysis results, along with recommendations for conserving and interpreting findings.
  • Describe artifacts' physical properties or attributes, such as the materials from which artifacts are made and their size, shape, function, and decoration.
  • Present findings from archeological research to peers and the general public.
  • Compare findings from one site with archeological data from other sites to find similarities or differences.
  • Record the exact locations and conditions of artifacts uncovered in diggings or surveys, using drawings and photographs as necessary.
  • Assess archeological sites for resource management, development, or conservation purposes and recommend methods for site protection.
  • Create a grid of each site and draw and update maps of unit profiles, stratum surfaces, features, and findings.
  • Collect artifacts made of stone, bone, metal, and other materials, placing them in bags and marking them to show where they were found.

Skills needed for this career

Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.

Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.

Science — Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.

Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Working Conditions/Work Enviornment/Work Context

Electronic Mail — How often do you use electronic mail in this job?

Duration of Typical Work Week — Number of hours typically worked in one week.

Face-to-Face Discussions — How often do you have to have face-to-face discussions with individuals or teams in this job?

Importance of Being Exact or Accurate — How important is being very exact or highly accurate in performing this job?

Freedom to Make Decisions — How much decision making freedom, without supervision, does the job offer?

Contact With Others — How much does this job require the worker to be in contact with others (face-to-face, by telephone, or otherwise) in order to perform it?

Telephone — How often do you have telephone conversations in this job?

Work With Work Group or Team — How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job?

Structured versus Unstructured Work — To what extent is this job structured for the worker, rather than allowing the worker to determine tasks, priorities, and goals?

Indoors, Environmentally Controlled — How often does this job require working indoors in environmentally controlled conditions?

Education needed

Percentage of Respondents

Education Level Required

48

Doctoral or professional degree

42

Master's degree

9

Bachelor's degree

Interests that could help you

Investigative — Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

Realistic — Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

Artistic — Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.

Values

Achievement — Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.

Recognition — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.

Working Conditions — Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.

Information on wages and employment outlook/trends

Median wages (2012)

$27.61 hourly, $57,420 annual

Employment (2012)

7,000 employees

Projected growth (2012-2022)

Faster than average (15% to 21%)

Projected job openings (2012-2022)

2,600

Top industries (2012)

Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services

Government