Legislative Branch

The Legislative Branch is made up of the House of Representatives and The Senate

Senate:

  • Has 100 members- 2 from each state.
  • Serve a six-year term.
  • Can approve or reject treaties and presidential nominations for government offices.
  • Must be at least 30 years old
  • Must be a U.S. citizen for at least 9 years.
  • Must have fulfilled the requirements to live in the state that person wishes to represent.


"Congress for Kids: [Legislative Branch]: The Senate." Congress for Kids: [Legislative Branch]: The Senate. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Dec. 2015.


House of Representatives:
  • Has 435 members.
  • Representatives serve a two-year term.
  • Can introduce spending bills.
  • Must be at least 25 years old.
  • Must be a U.S. citizen for at least 7 years.
  • Must live in the state in which he shall be chosen when elected.


"Congress for Kids: [Legislative Branch]: House of Representatives." Congress for Kids: [Legislative Branch]: House of Representatives. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Dec. 2015.

Big image
"Write Your Representative." - Ductile Iron Pipe Research Association. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Dec. 2015.
Big image
"VCU Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program." VCU Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Dec. 2015.

Delegated and implied powers:

Delegated Powers


Delegated powers are powers that are established in Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution. Some examples of them are...


  • The power to lay and collect taxes
  • The power to coin money
  • The power to declare war



Implied Powers


The elastic clause states that "Congress can do what is necessary and proper for the welfare of the nation" which means that they can do anything that would benefit the nation. Implied powers are not listed in the Constitution. Some examples of them are...


  • Power to create a national bank
  • Power to create academies for the military and the navy
  • Power to regulate agriculture



"The Legislative Branch." The White House. The White House, n.d. Web. 05 Dec. 2015.

Who is in the Senate?

  • Senator Edward Markey
  • Vice President Joe Biden
  • President Pro Tempore Orrin Hatch
  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell
  • Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid


"U.S. Senate: Organization Chart." U.S. Senate: Organization Chart. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Dec. 2015.

Who is in the House of Representatives?

  • Representative Niki Tsongas
  • Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
  • House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy
  • House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi


"Leadership." · House.gov. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Dec. 2015.

How does a bill become a law?

1. Each law starts out as an idea.

2. The idea must be written down and explained

3. The sponsor introduces the bill to either the House or the Senate

4. The bill is sent to a committee. The committee can decide to make changes.

5. If the bill began in the House, the Representatives will discuss and debate the bill and take a vote. If it passes through a majority vote, it will be sent to the Senate.

6. The Senate will discuss and debate the bill and take a vote. If it passes through a majority vote, it will be sent to the President.

7. If the President signs the bill, it becomes a law.

8. The president can veto the bill and not sign it. The Senate and House can override the president's veto and take another vote. To override the veto, the bill must pass the Senate and House by a two-thirds majority.

9. The President has 10 days to sign the bill. If he does not sign it, then one of two things will happen: 1) If the Congress is in session it will become a law, or 2) If the Congress is not in session it will be vetoed (this is also called a pocket veto).


"US Government." For Kids: How Laws Are Made. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Dec. 2015.