North vs. South

Geography, society, transportation, economy

North

Geography in the north was a mix, from the rocky shores of Maine to the beautiful green plains of Iowa. Changes of seasons such as Summer to fall were difficult conditions to live in. especially in the cold white Winter. Some places by the shore were hard and rocky while in other places they where soft and sandy. Rocky soil made it difficult to farm so the people in the north came up with an alternative. Water was common in the north.

Society in the north most people were middle class. Not really rich nor poor, but middle class. Some lived on farms but most lived in cities and they were slave free. Disease was a common thing in the north because their streets were dirty and didn't have many sewers so sickness spread and killed quickly.

Transportation in the north consisted of railroads,fast ships and canals, and horse drawn carriages. Trains made shipping and getting from place to place much faster. Instead of having to ride by carriage. Everyday they would lay new track and it was hard work. Lots of time and effort were put into making them.

Economy in the north is made of fishing, wheat and corn farms, and factories. The North was the poor side of the country. They used water powered machines which also saved alot of labor.

South

Geography in the south was mainly warm and got very little water. Swampy marshes made great rice and sugar cane which made a great way to get some money. Cotton was also a very common thing in the south.

Society in the south most of the people in the south were very rich from owning slaves because they got all the money from the work that the slaves did.

Transportation in the south in the south there was very little railroads, mainly boats and carriages were their transportation.

Economy in the North Slave trade, Cotton, rice, and sugar cane were some/most of the way the south got all their money. they would have the slaves do their work for them. and they got the money.

VISITING A WORKING TRAIN BUILT IN THE 1800'S