Eating Disorders

An Informative Flyer

What is an Eating Disorder?

An Eating Disorder can be defined as: "any range of psychological disorders characterized by abnormal or disturbed eating habits."


- www.google.com

What are the Different Types of Eating Disorders?

There are many types of eating disorders, including:


Anorexia Nervosa. (Anorexia) "a serious, potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by self-starvation and excessive weight loss."

Bulimia Nervosa. (Bulimia) "a serious, potentially life-threatening eating disorder characterized by a cycle of bingeing and compensatory behaviors such as self-induced vomiting designed to undo or compensate for the effects of binge eating."

Binge Eating Disorder. "an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of eating large quantities of food (often very quickly and to the point of discomfort); a feeling of a loss of control during the binge; experiencing shame, distress or guilt afterwards; and not regularly using unhealthy compensatory measures to counter the binge eating. Binge Eating is a severe, life-threatening and treatable eating disorder. Common aspects of BED include functional impairment, suicide risk, and a high frequency of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Binge eating disorder is the most common eating disorder in the United States.."


- www.nationaleatingdisorders.org

Symptoms of Different Eating Disorders

With each disorder, there are different symptoms:


Anorexia:

- "Inadequate food intake leading to a weight that is clearly too low."

- "Intense fear of weight gain, obsession with weight and persistent behavior to prevent weight gain."

- "Self-esteem overly related to body image."

- "Inability to appreciate the severity of the situation."

Bulimia:

- "Frequent episodes of consuming very large amounts of food followed by behaviors to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting."

- "A feeling of being out of control during the binge-eating episodes."

- "Self-esteem overly related to body image."

Binge Eating:

- "Recurrent episodes of binge eating. An episode of binge eating is characterized by both of the following:

* Eating, in a discrete period of time, an amount of food that is definitely larger than what most people would eat in a similar period of time under certain circumstances.

* A sense of lack of control over eating during the episode. "

- "The binge eating episodes are associated with three (or more) of the following:

* Eating more rapidly than normal.

* Eating until feeling uncomfortably full.

* Eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry.

* Eating alone because of feeling embarrassed by how much one is eating.

* Feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or very guilty afterwards."

- "Marked distress regarding binge eating is present."

- "The binge eating occurs, on average, at least once a week for 3 months."

- "The binge eating is not associated with the recurrent use of inappropriate compensatory behaviors as in Bulimia Nervosa and does not just occur exclusively during the course of Bulimia Nervosa or Anorexia Nervosa."


- www.nationaleatingdisorders.org

Warning Signs of Bulimia & Anorexia

Anorexia:

- "Dramatic weight loss.

- Preoccupation with weight, food, calories, fat grams, and dieting.

- Refusal to eat certain foods, progressing to restrictions against whole categories of food.

- Frequent comments about feeling 'fat' or overweight despite weight loss.

- Anxiety about gaining weight or being 'fat'.

- Denial of hunger.

- Development of food rituals.

- Consistent excuses to avoid mealtimes or situations involving food.

- Excessive, rigid exercise regimen- despite weather, fatigue, illness, or injury, the need to 'burn off' calories taken in.

- Withdrawal from usual friends and activities.

- In general, behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting, and control of food are becoming primary concerns."


Bulimia:

- "Evidence of binge eating, including the disappearance of large amounts of food in short periods of time or finding wrappers and containers indicating the consumption of large amounts of food.

- Evidence of purging behaviors, including frequent trips to the bathroom after meals, signs and/or smells of vomiting, presence of wrappers or packages of laxatives or diuretics.

- Excessive, rigid exercise regimen- despite weather, fatigue, illness, or injury, the need to 'burn off' calories taken in.

- Unusual swelling of the cheeks or jaw area.

- Calluses on the back of the hands and knuckles from self-induced vomiting.

- Discoloration or staining of the teeth.

- Creation of lifestyle schedules or rituals to make time for binge-and-purge sessions.

- Withdrawal from usual friends and activities.

- In general, behaviors and attitudes indicating that weight loss, dieting, and control of food are becoming primary concerns.

- Continued exercise despite injury; overuse injuries."


- www.nationaleatingdisorders.org

How to Help

"If you suspect an eating disorder in someone you love, educate yourself about the disorder. Then, talk to your friend. Let them know you care about what they're going through, and have a treatment resource available, such as a phone number for a counselor."


- www.psychguides.com