Rhinoceros

Peyton Owen Period 9 5/9/16

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Habitat

The Rhinos habitat differ according to their species. The White Rhino likes to be in grassland areas. They also like to hang in savannahs which have small trees and bushes. The Black Rhino loves the bush land and semi dessert areas. The Indian Rhinoceros live in areas where there are meadows, where there is probably a lot of grass to munch on. Though they also like swamp lands where they can really wallow. There are two species of Rhinos left but you can find them in the same place. Both the Javan and the Sumatran Rhinoceroses live in the rain forest. Where it might be a little more wet and more water for them to wallow in.

Movement

Rhinos have 4 legs. On each of these legs are feet with 3 toes on them. To get around to wallow, find food, mate, and eat they use their legs. One thing that Rhinoceroses love to do no matter what species of Rhinoceros is to wallow. Wallowing is when you roll around in water, mud, and snow.
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Body Covering

These mammals have an immense body. Rhinoceroses skin are seriously extremely thick. "They're built like armored tanks with horns that can stop tigers in their tracks, They're Rhinoceros" (Greene) Rhinos have almost no hair what so ever. Their feet have 3 big fat meaty toes and their legs are very stout. Rhinos have very thick and big ears that can swivel so they have very good hearing. Though Rhinos have great hearing their small eyes make it harder for them to see. (Rhinoceroses: Rhinoceotidae)

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Diet

Rhinoceroses eat a variety of foods. But mostly all the different types of Rhinoceroses eat the same basic stuff. They are all vegetarians. So they eat leaves, fruit, and a lot of different types of grass. Because of their large size their digestion process is longer(Rhinoceroses: Rhinocotidae) Also Rhinos actually eat half of the day. They also like to eat when they are all alone. Their horns are used to plow grass so they can eat it.(Greene)
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Reproduction

Pregnancy for a Rhinoceros lasts about 15-16 months. Baby Rhinos or calves remain with their mommy for 2-4 years. They also nurse. Since they are mammals Rhinos develop inside the female. Rhinos are ready to mate at four to five years old but hold off till about ten because of all the competition for mating.(Rhinoceroses: Rhinoceotidae)

Adaptation

Rhinoceroses weigh up to 2200 pounds. (Rhinoceroses: Rhinoceotidae) Part of the reason that they weigh so much is because they have such thick skin and a bulky body. Even though Rhinos are such powerful creatures, they have no natural predators that they have to watch out for. One thing about Rhinos is that since they have horrible eye sight if they smell something unknown or unusual they will probably charge at it. (10 Cool Things about Rhinos)
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Other Info

  • One of the largest land animals (Greene)
  • One of the most endangered species (Greene)
  • Rhinos use horns for defense (Greene)
  • They can run up to 56kph (Greene)
  • Live up to 40 years (Greene)
  • Weigh up to 57 kg (Greene)
  • 5 species (Greene)
  • Sumatran, White, Black, Javan, and Indian(World Book 293)
  • Sumatran, White, and Black all have 2 horns
  • Javan and Indian have 1 horn
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Work Cited

Works Cited

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“Poaching Threatens Rhinos in South Africa.” Gale Research in Context. Gale, n.d. Web. 13 May 2016. <http://go.galegroup.com/ps/retrieve.do?sort=RELEVANCE&docType=Photograph&tabID=Images&prodId=MSIC&searchId=R1&resultListType=RESULT_LIST&searchType=BasicSearchForm&contentSegment=&currentPosition=2&searchResultsType=SingleTab&inPS=true&userGroupName=auro18260&docId=GALE%7CCT3294211101&contentSet=GALE%7CCT3294211101>.

“Rhinoceros.” The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia. N.p.: n.p., n.d. N. pag. Gale Research in Context. Web. 10 May 2016. <http://go.galegroup.com/ps/retrieve.do?sort=RELEVANCE&docType=Topic+overview&tabID=T001&prodId=MSIC&searchId=R3&resultListType=RESULT_LIST&searchType=BasicSearchForm&contentSegment=&currentPosition=1&searchResultsType=MultiTab&inPS=true&userGroupName=auro18260&docId=GALE%7CA69226019&contentSet=GALE%7CA69226019>.

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“Rhinoceros, White.” SIRS Discoverer. SIRS, n.d. Web. 15 May 2016. <http://discoverer.prod.sirs.com/discoweb/disco/do/picture?picurn=urn%3Asirs%3AUS%3BIMAGE%3BTHM%3B0000060233>.

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