Diamante Poems

By Brooke Clark and Michael Stanton

What is a diamante poem?

A diamante poem is a poem in the shape of a diamond. Each line uses specific types of words, like adjectives and -ing words. It does not have to rhyme. The diamante poem is made up of seven lines. A diamond poem, or diamante poem, represents a very specific, stylistic poem that, when completed, forms a visual shape that resembles a diamond.

The Structure of the Diamante Poem

A diamante poem is made up of 7 lines using a set structure:

Line 1: Beginning subject

Line 2: Two describing words about line 1
Line 3: Three doing words about line 1

Line 4: A short phrase about line 1, a short phrase about line 7
Line 5: Three doing words about line 7
Line 6: Two describing words about line 7
Line 7: End subject

Beach

Beach

Beautiful, sandy

amazing, cool, refreshing,

fun, outstanding, crazy, crowded

relaxing, happy, life

stress less, merry

hopeful

Fire

Fire

red, burning

non-breezy, relaxing, big

destroying, cool, catching, blazing

blue, cold, calm

refreshing, giant

water

Storm

Storm

noisy, dark

windy, rainy, cloudy

scary, enormous, thunder, lightning

peaceful, gold, colorful

little rain, long

rainbow

Plants

Plants

green, pretty

red, blue, yellow

purple, amazing, outstanding, beautiful

ugly, rotten, tall

frightening, nasty

weeds

Tree

Tree

tall, long

green, yellow, red

brown, thick, outstanding, cool

little, fat, ugly

root, hollow

stump

Egg

Egg

small, round

shell, yolk, shell

cracked, nest, white, tan

big, feathers, chicken

lovely, fast

yellow

The history of Diamante poems

A diamante – (pronounced dee-uh-MAHN-tay) – is an un-rhymed seven-line poem. The beginning and ending lines are the shortest, while the lines in the middle are longer, giving diamante poems a diamond shape. “Diamante” is the Italian word for diamond, so this poetic form is named for this diamond shape. Believe it or not, the diamante was invented just 40 years ago. It was created by an American poet named Iris McClellan in 1969, and has become very popular in schools.