Stop Cyberbullying

Stop Bullying. No One Deserves To Feel Worthless.

What is Cyberbullying?

Cyberbullying is when someone uses technology to bully people online.

Examples of Cyberbullying

  • Mean text messages or mails
  • Rumors sent my email or posted on social networking sites
  • Embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles

Three differences of cyberbullying & bullying

  • Cyberbullying can happen 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • Cyberbullying messages and images can be posted anonymously and distributed quickly to a very wide audience.
  • Deleting inappropriate or harassing messages, texts, and pictures is extremely difficult after they have been posted or sent.

Effects of Cyberbullying

  • Use alcohol and drugs
  • Skip school
  • Experience in person bullying
  • Receive poor grades
  • Have lower self-esteem

Prevention & Awareness

  • Know the sites your kids visit and their online activities. Ask where they're going, what they're doing, and who they're doing it with.
  • Have a sense of what they do online and in texts. Learn about the sites they like. Try out the devices they use.
  • Ask for their passwords, but tell them you’ll only use them in case of emergency.
  • Ask to "friend" or "follow" your kids on social media sites or ask another trusted adult to do so.
  • Encourage your kids to tell you immediately if they, or someone they know, is being cyberbullied.

Establishing Rules

  • Establish rules about appropriate use of computers, cell phones, and other technology.
  • Tell them not to share anything that could hurt or embarrass themselves or others.
  • Tell kids to keep their passwords safe and not share them with friends.

Reporting a Cyberbully

  • Review their terms and conditions or rights and responsibilities sections. These describe content that is or is not appropriate.
  • Report cyberbullying to the social media site so they can take action against users abusing the terms of service.
  • Visit social media safety centers to learn how to block users and change settings to control who can contact you.

Report to your Online Service Provider

  • Review their terms and conditions or rights and responsibilities sections. These describe content that is or is not appropriate.
  • Visits social media safety centers to learn how to block users and change settings to control who can contact you.
  • Report cyberbullying on the social media site so they can take action against users abusing the terms of services.

Report to your local Law Enforcement

  • Threat of violence
  • Child pornography or sending sexually explicit messages or photos.
  • Stalking and hate crimes.

Report to your School

  • Cyberbullying can create a disruptive environment at school and is often related in- person bullying. The school can use the information to help inform prevention and response strategies.
  • In many states, schools are required to address cyberbullying in their anti-bullying policy. Some state laws also cover off- campus behavior that creates a hostile school environment.