Murder or Suicide?

By: Jada Clark

The Life of Marilyn Monroe

Born Norma Jean Mortenson (or Baker) in Los Angeles, California, on June 1st 1926 , was a star to be. After marrying James Dougherty and the baseball player Joe DiMaggio in 1954, Marilyn Monroe met writer Arthur Miller and married him as well. During World War II she worked in the aircraft factory and then moved on to modeling. In 1946 she had a short contract with 20th Centruy-Fox where she had her debut in Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! In 1950 she had success in the films The Asphalt Jungle and All About Eve which led to a long-term contract with Fox. After being in the spotlight Marilyn decided to move on with her love life. She had affairs with both Bobby Kennedy and John F. Kennedy. She even kept a little red book of their family secrets, threatening to expose them to the public. On August 5, 1962 Marilyn passed by what people thought was suicide but turned out to be a well planned murder...well not that well planned.
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Suicide or just a Conspiracy?

Marilyn was diagnosed with depression and the world knew it. Her death in the media was seen as a probable suicide by barbiturate poisoning at her home in Los Angeles on August 5, 1962. She was found lying nude on her bed, face down, with a telephone in one hand. Their were empty bottles of pills that were prescribed to treat her depression scattered around the room. The police concluded that her death was caused by a self-administered overdose of sedative drugs. It was hard to believe that such a young, beautiful woman would commit suicide while her dream was coming true. There is more to the story than the media led on and everyone was determined to find out what it was.
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Media Portrayal

The media portrayed the death of Marilyn Monroe as a suicide then a conspiracy. Some people could argue that the fame and stardom got to her head. Others would say she is just like her mom and went crazy but what they refused to think about is murder. Could it be possible that someone murdered her instead of her committing suicide? With her affairs with multiple Kennedys, this could have been karma catching up to her. She did keep a little secret red book that contained information about the Kennedys. The Kennedys did not want any of those secrets to get out.
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Bias

The death of Marilyn Monroe was seen as two probable causes suicide or murder. The newspapers portrayed it as suicide. After the autopsy confirmed that she died by a drug overdose everyone believed it was suicide. As of today, people find it hard to believe that such a young, beautiful, talented woman would kill herself especially after she was taking the world by storm. The only option left to believe is murder. Some people believe that she was killed by the Kennedys and they planned her murder just perfect.
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Criticism

The death of Marilyn Monroe can be viewed from many critical lenses. You could view it as a feminist criticism. She was seen as a sex symbol and she wanted that. Marilyn said "Being a sex symbol is a heavy load to carry, especially when one is tired hurt and bewildered." She became famous based on her looks. There was one role where she was wearing a white dress and it started blowing up with the wind. This image has been the symbol for Marilyn ever since.
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Opinion

In my opinion I believe Marilyn Monroe was murdered by the Kennedys. After her affairs with both Bobby and John, they had enough. She had dirt on them and they knew it. Marilyn kept a little red book of their family secrets and they would do anything to keep the public from finding it. This gives Bobby Kennedy a cause for murder.

Citations

http://go.galegroup.com/ps/searchWithin.do?quickSearchTerm=marilyn+monroe+&quicksearchIndex=OQE&method=doSearch&search=SEARCH&searchType=BasicSearchForm&searchId=R2&sgHitCountType=None&inPS=true&stw.option=&nwf=y&userGroupName=avon12&prodId=GVRL&prevQuickSearchIndex=OQE&prevQuickSearchTerm=marilyn+monroe+sex+symbol

Henry, Catherine. "Monroe, Marilyn." International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers. Ed. Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast. 4th ed. Vol. 3: Actors and Actresses. Detroit: St. James Press, 2000. 847-850. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 5 May 2015.

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