Brazilian Free Tailed Bat

James Dutton, per #3

Basic Information

  • Scientific Name: Tadarida Brasiliensis
  • range:
  • Features:
  • big rat like ears
  • long semi-translucent wings
  • small feet
  • 3.5" in height on average
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Diet

The Brazilian Free Tailed Bat's diet consist of bugs such as:
  • wasps
  • beetles
  • dragonflies
  • ants
  • moths
  • flies
This Bat is also an excellent pollinator.

Reproduction habits

The Reproduction Habits of this animal can be hostile and aggressive. The male with calmly fly over the female to mount her with no resistance from the female. the male controls the moves the female makes and keeps her away from other males and will often vocalize to scare away the competition.
  • females become sexually mature with in 6 months
  • males become sexually mature at around 2 years
  • the females only enter estrus once a year last for around 5 - 6 weeks
  • the gestation period last 11 - 12 weeks with only one pup being born.
  • babies are typically full grown and independent after 4 - 7 weeks.

Special Adaptations

  • echolocation
  • nocturnal
  • more active in warm weather.
  • can fly hundreds of meters above ground.
  • although they have many predators they are still strong in number.
  • ability to roosts

Habitat

Roost in:
  • caves
  • Buildings
  • under bridges
  • old hollowed trees
  • and any other structure that provides warmth and darkness.
Before buildings, caves would roost millions of bats. until now any cave was a Bruce Wayne nightmare waiting to happen.

Migration

Brazilian free-tailed bats in southeastern Nevada, southwestern Utah, western Arizona and southeastern California come together to migrate southwest to southern California and Baja California for the warmer weather. Some bats that spend summer in Kansas, Oklahoma, eastern New Mexico and Texas will migrate southward to southern Texas and Mexico. Some bat populations in other areas of North America such as in southern Oregon do not migrate but hibernate and may make seasonal changes in roost sites.
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