Dwarf stars

  • A term commonly applied to the main-sequence stars that are fainter than absolute magnitude +1.

    • These bodies include the sun also the majority of stars that fall in the main sequence on the Russell spectrum-luminosity diagram.

  • Danish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung first used the term to contrast low-luminosity.

  • Red Dwarf star Red dwarfs, also known as M stars, are dimer compared to other stars like the sun and just 10 to 20 percent as big.

Since red dwarfs are so cold compared to the sun, and our planets. We would have to be very close in to be able to see any life as we know it. Red dwarfs, also known as the M stars, are dimer compared to the stars like the sun and just 10 to 20 percent as massive.
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Now that scientists find other planets may remain habitable farther away from a red dwarf than once thought. This could mean there is a chance that there are far more habitable worlds around red dwarfs.


The habitability of stars depend on how hot or cold it is, which in turn makes it in a large part on how much starlight it absorbs and reflects. Frozen water such as ice and snow reflects light, which means it helps make the planets cooler, including Earth.


Red Dwarf Stars: The Embers of Creation


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"Extending the Habitable Zone for Red Dwarf Stars - Astrobiology Magazine." Astrobiology Magazine. N.p., 22 Feb. 2012. Web. 02 Dec. 2015.