All Of The fun of Christmas

Christmas

Elf On The Shelf

Elf on the shelf's are a fun family tradition. The book was published in December 2005 it had become a hit children's picture book, written and self-published by American author Carol Aebersold and daughter Chanda Bell and illustrated by Coë Steinwart, featuring a Christmas-themed tale, written in rhyme, that explains how Santa Claus knows who is naughty and who is nice. This is a fun way to start family traditions and it can give you a big laugh at times!


Elf on The Shelf Caught Moving

The Christmas Tree

The tree was traditionally decorated with edibles such as apples, nuts or other foods. In the 18th century, it began to be illuminated by candles, which with electrification could also be replaced by Christmas lights. Today, there are a wide variety of traditional ornaments, such as garland, tinsel, and candy canes. An angel or star may be placed at the top of the tree to represent the angelGabriel or the Star of Bethlehem from the Nativity.

The custom of the Christmas tree developed in early modern Germany with predecessors that can be traced to the 16th and possibly the 15th century, in which "devout Christians brought decorated trees into their homes".[1] Christmas trees are hung in St. George's Church, Sélestat since 1521.[2] It acquired popularity beyond Germany during the second half of the 19th century.[3] The Christmas tree has also been known as the "Yule-tree", especially in discussions of its folkloristic origins.[4][5][6]




Christmas Carols

A Christmas carol (also called a noël) is a carol (song or hymn) whose lyrics are on the theme of Christmas or the winter season in general, and which is traditionally sung in the period immediately surrounding the holiday. Christmas carols may be regarded as a subset of the broader category of Christmas music.


Christmas Lights

Christmas lights are lights used for decoration around Christmas. The custom goes back to the use of candles to decorate the Christmas tree in upper-class homes in 18th-century Germany. Christmas trees displayed publicly and illuminated with electric lights became popular in the early 20th century. By the mid-20th century, it became customary to display strings of electric lights as along streets and on buildings Christmas decorations detached from the Christmas tree itself. In the United States, it became popular to outline private homes with such Christmas lights in tract housing beginning in the 1960s. By the late 20th century, the custom had also been adopted in non-western countries, notably in Japan.