Llona's College & Career portfolio

Thinking about the future

SCAD: About

The Savannah College of Art and Design was founded in 1978 by Richard G. Rowan, Paula Wallace, May L. Poetter and Paul E. Poetter to provide college degree programs not previously available in southeast Georgia and to create a specialized professional art college to attract students from throughout the United States and abroad. The curriculum was established with dual goals of excellent arts education and effective career preparation for students. Today, with multiple locations and online distance education offerings, SCAD continues to assiduously adhere to these goals. SCAD was legally incorporated in the state of Georgia Sept. 29, 1978. A board of trustees was established, and the search was begun for a competent faculty and an appropriate facility. In the spring of 1979, SCAD purchased and renovated the Savannah Volunteer Guard Armory to serve as the first classroom and administration building. The historic significance of the 1892 structure was recognized by its nomination for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Named Poetter Hall in honor of two of the founders, the building remains in active use by SCAD today. SCAD exists to prepare talented students for professional careers, emphasizing learning through individual attention in a positively oriented university environment. The goal of the university is to nurture and cultivate the unique qualities of each student through an interesting curriculum, in an inspiring environment, under the leadership of involved professors.

Big image

Majors

https://www.scad.edu/academics/programs/fashion

SCAD students are flawlessly prepped for leadership in the dynamic and ultra-competitive global fashion industry. Our rigorous curriculum is structured around principles of design, unbounded creativity and state-of-the-art technology. The SCAD fashion program has deep industry connections, and top fashion trendsetters visit and work with students frequently. With the tutelage of award-winning, experienced faculty and visiting mentors, you will master the full spectrum of fashion — from the conceptual to the commercial.


Careers in the fashion industry:

  • Fashion designer
  • Fashion buyer
  • Menswear designer
  • Women's apparel designer
  • Pattern maker
  • Fashion forecaster
  • Fashion illustrator
  • Bridalwear designer
  • Embroidery designer
Tools provided by SCAD for the fashion program:
  • Design studio classrooms, lecture classrooms, and drawing and fashion sketching classrooms
  • PC CAD labs with Wacom Cintiq tablets
  • Sewing labs with industry-standard Juki machines; multi-thread Juki and Brother sergers; Juki and Singer zig-zag, chain stitch and purl blind machines
  • Resource room with access to fabrics research, fashion books and magazines, and trend services Peclers Paris and WGSN
  • Bernina and Viking button hole and specialty machines, Juki and Pegasus cover stitch machines, U.S. Stitch Line and Rimoldi blind hem machines, Heat Seal machine by Insta
  • Adobe Creative Cloud (always up-to-date and free for download)
  • Gerber Vision Fashion Studio software and Gerber Infinity plotters for creating mood boards, flats, patterns, websites and portfolios
  • Pattern drafting tables, Wolf and PGM dress forms, and steam irons

https://www.scad.edu/academics/programs/accessory-design

As the only university in the world to offer an M.F.A. in accessory design and the first in the U.S. to offer an M.A. in the discipline, we’re used to setting the bar at SCAD. We pride ourselves on an accessory design department that provides students with coveted internships, high-end tools and celebrated faculty who are at the peak of the profession. As a student at SCAD, you’ll also benefit from red-carpet events that bring the biggest names in the industry, as well as opportunities to learn directly from the stars of accessory design.


Careers in Accessory Design:

  • Footwear designer
  • Production manager
  • Global resource manager
  • Handbag designer
  • Luggage designer
  • Patternmaker
  • Leather goods designer
  • Children's accessory designer
  • Belt designer
Tools provided by SCAD for the Accessory Design Program:
  • Three accessory design labs/studios offering Rhino, Juki cylinder arm, Supreme 750 Finisher, Mauser post-bed, top-of-the-line Comelz computerized skiving and splitting machines
  • A PC CAD lab with Cintiq tablets and Adobe Creative Suite, Gerber Vision Fashion Studio software and Gerber Plotter Infinity
  • Resource room with access to fabrics research, fashion books and magazines, material samples and trend services Peclers Paris and WGSN
  • Sewing labs with industry-standard Juki machines; multi-thread Juki and Brother sergers; Juki and Singer zig-zag, cover stitch, and purl blind machines; pattern drafting tables; dress forms; and steam irons

Extracurricular Activities

  • Fashion Buzz
  • Fashion Illustration Club
  • Volleyball Club
  • Women's Track and field
  • Women's Tennis

Dining

https://www.scad.edu/life/dining/meal-plans

https://www.scad.edu/life/dining/locations


SCAD offers several dining options to suit students' schedules and lifestyles. Meal plans may be purchased by the quarter, and services are accessed through the use of the SCAD Card. Meal plans are not available in Hong Kong Gold Coast Residences.


Residential meal plans

Four full-residential meal plans offer a designated number of meals per week or quarter, as well as a variable amount of flexible spending credit (Dining Dollars) to be used at SCAD eateries of the students' choice.

Commuter meal plans

A commuter meal plan offers a designated number of meals per quarter for students residing off campus.

Housing

https://www.scad.edu/life/residence-life

https://www.scad.edu/life/residence-life/residence-halls

Residence Halls


Barnard Village:

Housing features

  • Three-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 285

Room features

  • Apartment-style living with private bedrooms for four students
  • Single-floor apartments
  • Air conditioning
  • Two baths in each apartment
  • Full kitchen
  • Living room with couch, end tables and coffee table
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80")
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall located at nearby Montgomery Hall
  • Clubhouse with pool table and meeting area
  • ADA accessibility
  • Limited parking available on site

Housing fees

  • US$10,425/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan not required

Boundary Village:

Housing features

  • Three-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 385

Room features

  • Apartment-style living with private bedrooms for four students
  • Single-floor apartments
  • Air conditioning
  • Two baths in each apartment
  • Full kitchen
  • Living room with couch, end tables and coffee table
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80")
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Sand volleyball court
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall located in nearby W at The Hive
  • Clubhouse and meeting area
  • ADA accessibility
  • Limited parking available on site

Housing fees

  • US$10,425/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan not required

C at The Hive:

Housing features

  • Four-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 250

Room features

  • Suites with two double-occupancy rooms for four students
  • Community cabinets with sink
  • Living room with couch, end tables, coffee table and wall-mounted shelf for flat-screen TV
  • Air conditioning
  • Separate shower, toilet and sink facilities in each suite
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80")
  • Desk and chair for each resident
  • Wardrobe with drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Elevator Service
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall and coffee shop located at The Hive
  • Computer lab located at The Hive
  • On-site security
  • ADA accessibility
  • Due to construction, on-site parking for freshmen will not be available until spring quarter 2017. SCAD will share updates with students as this project develops.

Housing fees

  • US$9,069/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan required US$1,745–US$2,090 per quarter

D at The Hive:

Housing features

  • Two-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 220

Room features

  • Double occupancy
  • Air conditioning
  • Private bath in each room
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80"); beds can be bunked
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Computer lab
  • Swimming pool, patio and lawn
  • Common room with large- screen television
  • Outdoor student lounge
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall located at adjacent W at The Hive
  • ADA accessibility
  • Limited parking available on site

Housing fees

  • US$8,889/year* for the 2015-16 academic year
  • Meal plan required US$1,680–US$2,050 per quarter

E at The Hive:

Housing features

  • Four-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 250

Room features

  • Suites with two double-occupancy rooms for four students
  • Community cabinets with sink
  • Living room with couch, end tables, coffee table and wall-mounted shelf for flat-screen TV
  • Air conditioning
  • Separate shower, toilet and sink facilities in each suite
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80")
  • Desk and chair for each resident
  • Wardrobe with drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Elevator Service
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall and coffee shop located at The Hive
  • Computer lab located at The Hive
  • On-site security
  • ADA accessibility
  • Due to construction, on-site parking for freshmen will not be available until spring quarter 2017. SCAD will share updates with students as this project develops.

Housing fees

  • US$9,069/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan required US$1,745–US$2,090 per quarter

H at The Hive:

Housing features

  • Four-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 250

Room features

  • Suites with two double-occupancy rooms for four students
  • Community cabinets with sink
  • Living room with couch, end tables, coffee table and wall-mounted shelf for flat-screen TV
  • Air conditioning
  • Separate shower, toilet and sink facilities in each suite
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80")
  • Desk and chair for each resident
  • Wardrobe with drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Elevator Service
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall and coffee shop located at The Hive
  • Computer lab located at The Hive
  • On-site security
  • ADA accessibility
  • Due to construction, on-site parking for freshmen will not be available until spring quarter 2017. SCAD will share updates with students as this project develops.

Housing fees

  • US$9,069/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan required US$1,745–US$2,090 per quarter


Montgomery House:

Housing features

  • Four-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 500

Room features

  • Suites with two double-occupancy rooms for four students
  • Community cabinets with sink
  • Living room with couch, end tables, coffee table and wall-mounted shelf for flat screen TV
  • Air conditioning
  • Separate shower, toilet and sink facilities in each suite
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80")
  • Desk and chair for each resident
  • Wardrobe with drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Elevator service
  • Study rooms, group lounge spaces and studios
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall located on property
  • On-site security
  • ADA accessibility
  • Limited parking available in nearby parking garage

Housing fees

  • US$9,069/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan required US$1,745–US$2,090 per quarter

Oglethorpe House:
Housing features

  • Six-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 400

Room features

  • Double occupancy
  • Air conditioning
  • Private bath in each room
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80"); beds can be bunked
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Elevator service
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • ADA accessibility
  • Limited parking avalable on site
  • On-site fitness center
  • On-site dining hall

Housing fees

  • US$9,069/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan required US$1,745–US$2,090 per quarter

Pulaski House:

Housing features

  • Three-story building
  • Women only
  • Occupancy: approximately 60

Room features

  • Apartment-style living with accommodations for up to four students
  • Single-floor apartments (two or three students); loft-style apartments (four students) with spiral staircase
  • Air conditioning
  • One or two private baths in each apartment
  • Kitchenette with sink, stovetop, microwave, cupboard and full-size refrigerator
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80"); beds can be bunked
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Elevator service
  • Common area with television and group work tables
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall located at nearby Oglethorpe House
  • Limited on-street and metered parking available

Housing fees

  • US$9,333/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan not required


The Terrace:

Housing features

  • Two-story buildings
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 400

Room features

  • Apartment-style living with one-bedroom apartments for two students and two-bedroom apartments for three students
  • Air conditioning
  • One bath in each apartment
  • Kitchen with refrigerator, oven and microwave
  • Living room with couch, end tables and coffee table
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds
  • (36" x 80"); beds can be bunked
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Internet access available; modems provided

Residence features

  • Sand volleyball court
  • Basketball court
  • Outdoor grilling areas
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • On-site security
  • Limited on-site and street parking

Housing fees

  • US$9,333/year* for the 2016-15 academic year
  • Meal plan not required


Turner Annex:

Housing features

  • Two-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 175

Room features

  • Double occupancy
  • Air conditioning
  • Private bath in each room
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80"); beds can be bunked
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Swimming pool, patio and lawn
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall located at nearby W at The Hive
  • ADA accessibility
  • Limited parking available on site

Housing fees

  • US$9,069/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan required US$1,745–US$2,090 per quarter


Turner House:

Housing features

  • Six-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 840

Room features

  • Triple occupancy
  • Air conditioning
  • Private bath in each room
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80"); beds can be bunked
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Wireless Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Elevator service
  • On-site express business office
  • On-site convenience store
  • On-site deli and coffee shop
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall located at nearby W at The Hive
  • ADA accessibility
  • Due to construction, on-site parking for freshmen will not be available until spring quarter 2017. SCAD will share updates with students as this project develops.

Housing fees

  • US$8,400/year* for the 2016-17 academic year
  • Meal plan required US$1,745–US$2,090 per quarter


W at The Hive:

Housing features

  • Two-story building
  • Coeducational
  • Occupancy: approximately 350

Room features

  • Double occupancy
  • Air conditioning
  • Private bath in each room
  • Extra-long, twin-size beds (36" x 80"); beds can be bunked
  • Drafting table and stool for each resident
  • Dresser/chest of drawers for each resident
  • Cable television service
  • Internet access for each resident

Residence features

  • Computer lab located at adjacent D at The Hive
  • On-site coffee shop
  • SCAD Card- or coin-operated laundry
  • Drink and snack vending machines
  • Dining hall
  • ADA accessibility
  • Due to construction, on-site parking for freshmen will not be available at The Hive until spring quarter 2017.

Housing fees

  • US$8,889/year* for the 2015-16 academic year
  • Meal plan not required

Financial aid

https://www.scad.edu/admission/financial-aid-and-scholarships/scholarships

Scholarships for entering students

Through the office of admission, SCAD administers a number of scholarships for entering students. Scholarship recipients are expected to be particularly strong and positive leaders at SCAD, excelling academically and representing SCAD well within the community. Scholarships are available to both United States citizens and non-U.S. citizens and are awarded to entering students prior to first-quarter attendance. Undergraduate students who wish to be considered for achievement scholarships must provide additional materials as part of their application for admission.

Scholarships for current students

Scholarships may be available to currently enrolled SCAD students based on academic achievement, financial need or a combination of the two. To be eligible, students must be on schedule to complete a minimum of 45 undergraduate hours or 15 graduate hours at SCAD by the end of spring quarter. The scholarship application for current students is available online, during the month of April only. Applicants are automatically considered for all applicable scholarships.

Contacts

Why is SCAD a good fit for me?

SCAD is a good fit for me because it is specifically for students who want to pursue a career in art and design. Personally, I want to pursue a career in the fashion industry, and SCAD, being one of the highest ranked colleges for design based careers would make it one of the best options. SCAD also has a variety of programs that I can take part in. SCAD is located in multiple locations including Savannah and Atlanta, which is closest to home, meaning less expensive and more comforting. Lastly, SCAD has plenty of dining and housing options, slightly affordable tuition, and a great reputation.

Rhode Island School of Design: About

Founded in 1877, Rhode Island School of Design (or “RIZ-dee” for the acronym RISD) is one of the oldest and best-known colleges of art and design in the U.S. Each year approximately 2,300 students from around the world pursue a creative, studio-based education at RISD, which offers rigorous bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in 19 architecture, design, fine arts and art education majors. The college is located in Providence, Rhode Island, which offers its own vibrant art scene and is conveniently located between two other major cultural centers: Boston and New York.

Big image

Majors

http://www.risd.edu/academics/apparel-design/

Apparel Design prepares students to meet the highest requirements of the fashion industry and articulate their own unique vision through the clothing they design and make. Emphasizing conceptual rigor matched by strong artistic and technical skills, the program guides majors through each stage of the apparel design process – from concept sketches to beautifully executed wearables.

Courses:

HISTORY OF DRESS

This class examines fashion in Europe and America from the eighteenth century to the present, covering the industrial revolution through the development of couture and postmodern fashion. It analyzes clothing as a social and cultural artifact, central to the construction of group and individual identity. Lectures and readings explore the production, consumption, use and meanings of dress, and will be supplemented by visits to the RISD museum. Course work will be comprised of group and independent research, written papers, and oral presentations.

JUNIOR CUT & SEW STUDIO

Students concentrate on designing with 'cut and sew' knit fabric. Through draping with knit fabrics on the form, students learn to utilize the inherent properties of knits. Instruction in 'cut and sew' construction is combined with pattern making techniques, enabling students to execute their concepts as finished garments.
Estimated Material Cost: $250.00

JUNIOR MACHINE KNITWEAR STUDIO

This course is an introduction to the creative and technical possibilities of the knitting machine. Through the development of knit swatches, the course will cover the following essentials of sweater knit design including graphing, calculating gauge and tension, shaping of a knit body, exploration of a diverse range of knit stitches, professional finishing of a knit garment, and how to select the best yarn to execute your final garment. Students will also develop unique trims and finishes to enhance their designs.

JUNIOR/DESIGN/DRAW/CAD

In Design/Drawing II, Junior students focus on designing for knitwear, experimenting three dimensionally as they explore the unique properties of knit fabrics. Color, texture, yarn and stitch variations are examined as students also design using the diverse properties of machine knitwear. Student build on existing drawing skills, learning new rendering techniques to communicate their knitwear designs. Students work with models to develop individual drawing styles while building effective portfolios.
Estimated Material Cost: $200.00

SENIOR COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT

During three integrated studios, students learn to expand the design process by developing professional collections from concept to presentation. Portfolio assignments are aimed at strengthening students' established styles and experimentation in new areas. Studios build on their draping, drafting and construction skills through individual instruction as they complete a collection for final presentation to the visiting critics. During studio, students also learn to use the computer as a design tool for product visualization and presentation.
Estimated Material Cost: $1,000.00

SOPHOMORE DESIGN/DRAW

The design component introduces research methods and conceptual skills, to be used with the medium of fabric. The drawing class focuses on the development of fashion croquis, drawing from the model, technical flats and presentation plates to effectively communicate the visual language of their design intentions. Students develop research methods and learn the importance of concepts, color and fabric stories.
Estimated Material Costs: $250.00

SOPHOMORE INTRO TO APPAREL STUDIO

This introductory course lays the foundation for the design process through draping, pattern drafting and construction. Students make basic patterns and proceed with variations to develop pattern making skills and design concepts. Weekly textile seminars introduce students to fibers and yarns, fabric types, properties and uses.
Estimated Material Cost: $100.00

*NORTHERN EUROPE SHOE DESIGN PERCEPTION, HISTORY & PROTOTYPING

Using the creative cultures of Germany, Netherlands and Belgium, students will use the experience of footwear design as a way to more deeply understand and expand their own personal design process. This course will inform through the practice of creative introspections inspired by Da Vinci's methods as well as from Northern European history, design practice and cultural aesthetic.
There will be a series studio and factory visits within a variety of design fields supported by museum and gallery visits. Students will also use their sketchbooks as visual and reflective journals to practice insightful daily exercises to advance their design process and footwear designs. During the visit to Northern Europe we will have three presentations, to share cultural explorations, process development and the progress of shoe designs. The final shoe design will reporesent the influence of these explorations, and the manifestation of an expanded design methodology.

DRAWING FOR FASHION

This course aims to immerse the students in the art of illustrating for fashion. Through practical experimentation, the students will explore the varied modes of drawing in this design area. In working from the live model, students will develop their own creative responses to traditional drawing techniques through a program of unconventional exercises. Dynamic in its teaching and studio practice, this course deconstructs classical figure drawing in favor of a raw intuitive approach. The fundamentals of proportion, composition and media are addressed whilst emphasis is placed upon expressive image making. In the need to convey and garment construction, students will investigate the means of communicating concept alongside design detail. Image making in the forms of portfolio presentation and illustrating for magazine editorial rely upon an innate skill for storytelling. From the outset, students will question their own creativity and desire to make. Focused drawing sessions are peppered with design challenges, with the course culminating in a final self-negotiated project.
Estimated Materials Cost: $250.00

DRESSED BODIES: BASIC APPAREL TECHNIQUES FOR NON-MAJORS

Dressed bodies, is a course conceived to expose students from external departments across RISD campus to a variety of making practices stemming from traditional apparel design practices. Students are expected to bring their current skill set and their apparel related curiosity with the aims of developing a personal project or enhancing apparel related skills. Clothing development, brand, soft-goods development, principles for creating 3 dimensional works around the body from 2 dimensional sketches and patterns as well as basic sewing skills will be covered throughout the body of this course. Principles learned here may be applied to a variety of fine arts processes as well as product design. Students will be encouraged to develop a better understanding of materials and construction techniques while exploring deeper relationships between 2D shape and 3D form. This dynamic, technical and creative class; supports students further understanding of sewing construction and how it directly relates to- and impacts any creative or technical project, ultimately broadening the students understanding of both material properties and essential technical components of fabric construction.
*Components of this class are seminar and self-directed.

HOOPED SKIRTS AND BUSTLES

This course focuses on hooped skirts and bustles. These structures can also be seen as sculpture or architecture - give volume and fullness to clothing and change the natural silhouette of the body. In the first phase students will analyze 19th century undergarments such as crinolines, bustles and lobsters, at the RISD museum's collection. Students will afterwards observe how these accessories can be seen in film costume (Gone With the Wind, The Piano), and in contemporary fashion (Jean-Paul Gaultier, Alexander McQueen, Comme des Garçons). In the second phase students will use their analysis to create new crinolines or bustles, made out of unconventional materials, in other scales, emphasizing different parts of the body. In a playful way, the structures made in studio will question our relation to history, to body morphology, and gender.
Estimated Material Costs: TBD

INTRODUCTION TO BASIC SHOEMAKING

Shoes are an everyday commodity; but do you know how many are steps involved? In this course, students will handcraft a basic pair of cemented construction shoes from start to finish. This includes beginning by creating a basic pattern, draping the last, cutting (clicking) the leather, sewing (closing) the upper, building a stacked leather heel, and finishing the sole. We will approach the requirements of constructing a shoe through choice of material, characteristics of leather, and how to utilize them in laying out the pattern. In the process of the construction from pattern to shoe, we will work with basic tools for handcrafted shoemaking including a shoemaker's knife, closers hammer, buff stick, lasting pincers to name a few. Students are expected to complete one pair of shoes and begin work on a second pair, applying and expanding upon the techniques learned in the class.

JUNIOR TAILORING STUDIO

Students focus on tailoring techniques and the design of tailored apparel. Drafting and classic tailoring techniques are taught and students explore shape and structure through experimentation on the form and creative pattern making. During this process, students use these technical skills to design and execute a jacket and companion piece.
Estimated Material Cost: $400.00

JUNIOR/DESIGN/DRAW/CAD

During the spring semester, Junior students focus on form and proportion as they explore the structural possibilities inherent in the art of tailoring. Students design multiple collections, examining the properties of cohesiveness and conceptual expansion. Projects in men's wear and children's wear expose students to new directions for their creativity as they learn new computer techniques. Individual drawing skills are strengthened as students refine their portfolios.
Estimated Material Cost: $200.00

SENIOR APPAREL COLLECTION

This senior level course focuses on the design of collections and the development of each student's unique interpretation of apparel design. The senior collections are a culmination of their skills and an exploration of their design vision. Originality, problem solving, and an organized design process are defined as essential elements of a successful degree project collection. Seniors refine and build their portfolios. Projects are aimed at enabling students to express a diverse but cohesive design vision. CAD instruction in Kaledo software gives students an additional creative tool.
Estimated Material Cost: $1,000.00

SOPHOMORE APPAREL STUDIO

Building on basic techniques taught first semester, students proceed to more complex cuts for bodices, sleeves, skirts and pants through techniques of draping, drafting and construction. One finished garment is required.
Estimated Material Cost: $125.00

SOPHOMORE DESIGN/DRAW

The design course builds on design process skills from the first semester through assignments that focus on research and its application, conceptual development, and team dynamics. Varied facets of apparel design are explored through lectures, museum research, classroom discussion, and creative exploration. The drawing component of the class focuses on print and texture rendering, drawing the fashion figure, layout design, and use of varied rendering media.
Estimated Material Cost: $150.00

Production Equipment:

  • 40 industrial sewing machines
  • Three industrial zig-zag sewing machines
  • Eight sergers
  • Two coverstitch machines
  • One walking foot (leather) machine
  • One high-post leather machine
  • Two industrial buttonhole machines
  • One Makerbot 3D printer
  • Cutting tables
  • 18 Brother knitting machines
  • Three bulky Brother knitting machines
  • Dress forms for each student






Computer Resources:

  • 15 PC and 1 Macintosh workstations
  • Lectra digital patternmaking system
  • Software: U4ia, PrimaVision (apparel industry software), Photoshop, Illustrator
  • Two flatbed scanners
  • Two color printers




http://www.risd.edu/academics/jewelry-metalsmithing/

Spanning the gamut from traditional goldsmithing to experimental processes and materials, Jewelry + Metalsmithing offers a tight-knit community of students and faculty fully engaged with the discipline. Critical analysis and an open exchange of ideas support each individual’s exploration of the relationship of jewelry to the body.




Courses:

ELECTROFORMING

This class is an intensive investigation of the processes of electroplating and electroforming copper metal by covering objects of various modeling materials to create new metal objects. All aspects of this technical application are discussed. Students are required to maintain an accurate logbook of their investigation while developing a body of work. Class is limited to three students.

GRAD JEWELRY SEMINAR 1

This course is devoted to developing one's abilities to write and speak with precision and complexity, about one's own work and the work of others. We will examine trends and movements in contemporary art through the lens of critical theory. We will investigate what contemporary art can tell us about the relationships between history, images, and visual culture, subsequently developing the skills necessary to write about your work, what it articulates and argues, and the ideas and traditions from which it emerges. Themes previously focused on in this class include Beauty, The Body, and The Subconscious. Each term will identify and address a new set of themes relevant to course content.

GRADUATE JEWELRY 1

In this studio, first-year graduates begin to recognize and develop personal areas of interest. Assignments are designed to bring structure to the exploration of various processes, materials, concepts, and formats. Weekly individual meetings focus on student's progress and response to assignments, as well as independent research.

GRADUATE JEWELRY 3

In this studio course, second-year students identify and pursue personally driven research. Weekly individual meetings and studio visits take place with the instructor, and also with scheduled first-year and second-year group critiques. Students are required to maintain a continuous record of their research and development through drawings, writings, samples, models, etc. Active participation in group discussions and critiques is mandatory.

GRADUATE JEWELRY SEMINAR 3

This course is devoted to developing one's abilities to write and speak with precision and complexity, about one's own work and the work of others. We will examine trends and movements in contemporary art through the lens of critical theory. We will investigate what contemporary art can tell us about the relationships between history, images, and visual culture, subsequently developing the skills necessary to write about your work, what it articulates and argues, and the ideas and traditions from which it emerges. Themes previously focused on in this class include Beauty, The Body, and The Subconscious. Each term will identify and address a new set of themes relevant to course content.

GRADUATE STUDIO 1

This course is designed to challenge first year graduates to rethink their previous assumptions about their work, prior training, working methodologies and approaches to their practice. Through a series of rigorous and innovative start-up exercises, graduates are encouraged to expand their subjects, abandon their comforts zones, fail, edit, and (re) direct their work. Equal emphasis is placed on critical thinking and critical making. Faculty, meet weekly, individually with each student to provide constructive feedback and necessary structure. In small group discussions and in-class reviews, first years are required to actively participate in discourse and take responsibility for the collective dialogue. The resulting insight and shared knowledge between students, along with their own personal gain, sets the tone and direction for their work at RISD over the next two years.

GRADUATE STUDIO 3

Following the completion of the first year, second-year graduates identify their personal areas of interest essential to the development of their thesis research and practice. Students are required to outline and pursue proposal-based work with a self-determined structure, timeline, and intentions. Regardless of outcome, students are expected to evidence their progress weekly during individual meetings with faculty. Central to the second year, graduates are required to demonstrate a high level of self-motivation, vision, and initiative reflected through their concentrated inquiry and the rigorous exploration of their ideas. In conclusion of the term, second year graduates are required to complete a thesis presentation, to a J+M faculty review committee, in approval of their preliminary objectives and strategies in preparation for Graduate J+M Thesis.

JEWELRY INTRODUCTION

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of design and metal fabrication techniques for both jewelry and small objects. Working with precious and non-precious metals, students learn traditional jewelry construction including sawing, filing, forming, soldering, and polishing. A series of structured assignments guide students as they transform their ideas into finished pieces. Solutions for projects are open to enable the student to explore his/her own aesthetic, but taught in a way to insure that students master the basic processes. Lectures on historical and contemporary jewelry supplement, inform, and inspire students' work.

JR METAL FORMING & CASTING

Students will be introduced to advanced metalsmithing techniques during the first 6 weeks of class that will require a new level of problem solving as well as an increasingly independent approach to the design and making process. Class projects will explore options for surface embellishment and investigate direct means of achieving form in metal. During the second six weeks of class the process of casting will be introduced. Inquiry into the finer points of fabricating and inventing innovative findings for jewelry will be an ongoing consideration. Research, drawing, and sample making are expected to precede each class assignment to facilitate students design process.

JUNIOR JEWELRY: DIGITAL 3D MODELING AND RENDERING

This course provides students with fundamental skills required to use Rhinoceros based 3D modeling CAD software. The Rhino program facilitates exploration of materials, and offers opportunities to push traditional fabricating techniques and enhance drawing skills. Assignments will be given to support student's ability to use CAD to visualize 3D form and detail during the first stages of the designing, and conclude the process with formal digital renderings. Students will be encouraged throughout the class to identify and explore the CAD's potential for their individual design needs.

JUNIOR SEMINAR

The course will provide students with a forum in which they will be exposed, encouraged, and engaged in contemporary studio craft discourse via texts. The course is designed to expose students to prominent ideas concerning the evolution of ideas (from early notions to the final piece), how to approach and identify working methods, the role of experimentation and (rigorous) play, and the incorporation of writing as a creative tool. Students will be expected to thoroughly read all texts and present thoughtful responses to the reading through class discussion and weekly writings. Emphasis will be placed on the development of critical thinking and reading skills.

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES

This course is intended to be an interactive lecture class. A series of distinctly varied individuals active in the field of jewelry will be invited to make presentation about their professional development. These diverging presentations are intended to offer a catalyst to stimulate questions, and encourage group discussion. Among the subjects to be presented are: individual studio practice, designing for industry, gallery connections, non-profit opportunities, partnerships, global opportunities, curatorial and journalistic prospects, wide world of the web, post graduation educational options, support systems for RISD alumni, residency prospects, and technology as resource for design and production. Students will be asked to keep an active journal of weekly observations and fulfill 3 class assignments connected with their ambitions and career interests.

SENIOR JEWELRY

An advanced studio course, students propose and develop individual research projects surrounding their interests in jewelry and metalsmithing. A continuation of technical skills is coupled with emphasis on conceptual development and critical thinking. In preparation for the Degree Project, students are encouraged to explore materials and processes that best serve their ideas. Reading and writing requirements, and participation in group critiques/discussions are also evaluated.

SENIOR STUDIO

An advanced studio course, students propose and develop individual research projects surrounding their interests in jewelry and metalsmithing. In preparation for the Degree Project, conceptual development and critical thinking are highly emphasized, and students are encouraged to explore materials and processes that best serve their ideas. Digital process documentation, Self-Observation writing and participation in-group critiques/discussions are required and highly evaluated.

SOPHOMORE HISTORY OF ADORNMENT

This history seminar provides an overview of personal adornment in both western and non-western societies. The goal is for the student to gain a deeper understanding of the history of jewelry and the context in which the objects are placed. The course is structured around weekly, thematic slide presentations that are supported by visits to RISD Museum collections, local research facilities and fieldtrips. Readings and class discussions examine topics such as placement of value (spiritual, material, social, sentimental). Class projects focus on strengthening research and presentation skills.

SOPHOMORE JEWELRY 1

Sophomore Jewelry I is the first of two introductory studio classes which will familiarize students with the creative jewelry studio environment. Fundamental tools and techniques integral to working with metal are introduced during class demonstrations over the semester. Class projects are structured to blend the use of tools with techniques and are introduced in order of complexity. The course begins with designing and constructing structurally sound 3D objects from 2D metal sheet stock. By the conclusion of the semester students are equipped with technical skills to make jewelry informed with an awareness of the body as site. This is the first of a two-semester course.

SOPHOMORE METALSMITHING

This introductory metalsmithing course blends technical instruction with an investigation of design and concept as it relates to ornament and function. Students develop confidence and proficiency with the basic skills of forming and fabrication. Specific techniques that will be covered are raising, forging, finishing non-ferrous metals, sawing, filing, drilling, sanding, polishing, annealing, surface embellishment, planishing and patination. We will also cover safety in the studio, proper hand-tool care, and the physical properties of metal. It is the goal of this course for students to gain an understanding of metal as a material and a broad understanding of the field of Jewelry and Metalsmithing. Assignments will build on each other and become more challenging throughout the semester. Each project given will rely on technical, formal and conceptual development. Classroom discussions, demonstrations and visual presentations will focus attention on traditional technical skills, design considerations, and the breadth of this exciting field.

CAD CAM CAST

This course explores a detailed investigation of the transformation of digitally created models into small refined metal objects through the traditional lost wax casting process. Students will use high resolution 3d printing of appropriate output materials and cnc milling of wax to generate castable objects and then cast in metal using in-house casting equipment and external service bureaus. Students can also utilize service bureaus for outputting their designs directly in metal. Metal castings will then be finished using a variety of techniques. Projects created can be but are not limited to jewelry objects. Objects created can be used as part of a larger project, i.e. drawer pulls, details of a sculpture, buttons for a coat etc.

FOUND

This class will focus on mining materials from the scrap heap, second-hand shops, and other sources. Students will solve the technical challenges that come from working with a preexisting form and a variety of materials. Class will consider concepts that are evoked when working with found objects that already have a history. Each student will explore the ideas conveyed by the objects, images, and materials they are drawn to, and how those ideas can be incorporated into their work, which may be jewelry, sculpture, or functional objects. Class will introduce simple metalsmithing techniques for beginning students such as: sawing, soldering, cold connections, forging, raising, and basic sheet fabrication. More advanced projects will be given to those who already have experience with metalsmithing and jewelry.
Estimated Materials Cost: $75.00

JEWELRY INTRODUCTION

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of design and metal fabrication techniques for jewelry. Working with precious and non-precious metals, students learn traditional jewelry construction including sawing, filing, forming, soldering, and polishing. A series of structured assignments guide students as they transform their ideas into finished pieces. Solutions for projects are open to enable the student to explore his/her own aesthetic, but taught in a way to insure that students master the basic processes.

GRADUATE J&M THESIS

Graduate J+M Thesis is a 9-credit course that meets twice a week with two different instructors. Each instructor grades students focusing on both studio thesis work and the theoretical concerns of the Graduate Jewelry 2 seminar.
Graduate students select two advisors outside of J+M faculty to provide additional insight and support into their thesis work, as well as to foster other professional contacts. Several guest lecturers make presentations throughout the semester about personal and professional experiences. The final thesis requirements are a written thesis document, curriculum vitae, artist statement, and twenty professional photographic images. The resulting body of thesis work is featured in the Graduate Exhibition at the RISD Museum in May. It is expected the Graduate J+M Thesis investigation yields uncharted results, reflects unique perspectives, and reveals high levels of execution.

GRADUATE JEWELRY 2

In Graduate Jewelry 2, first-year graduates hone in on recognized personal areas of interest specific to jewelry from the fall term. Students are encouraged to embrace new studio habits in order for individualized working methodologies to become apparent. Faculty, work with students, to foster the strengths of their natural proclivities and problem-solve areas of personal sabotage. Critical to the success of this course, it is essential that first year students demonstrate a high level of self-direction, curiosity, and drive reflected through their bench work and independent research. Course content continues to focus around jewelry's power and potential as a platform and catalyst for dialogue.

GRADUATE JEWELRY SEMINAR 2

The fall seminar concentrates on critical reading as an opportunity to locate, examine, and discuss your work within a broader field of inquiry. The additional objectives are to increase critical thinking, hone reading and writing skills, expand vocabulary, and build presentation skills. Woven into all of this is the understanding that research can be a valuable, if not essential, component of making - each informing and enriching the other. The focus of the spring seminar shifts to writing and presentation as an integral part of both studio and professional practice. Each spring brings a new team of guest instructors who introduce various modes of writing as a means to mine, develop and articulate ideas in a concise and authentic manner, and, to further hone that information into artist statements, written theses, and public presentations. Throughout the term writing will be the vehicle in which to move between private and public realms. This journey will begin with 'automatic writings' and culminate with your public artist presentations.


GRADUATE JEWELRY SEMINAR 4

The fall seminar concentrates on critical reading as an opportunity to locate, examine, and discuss your work within a broader field of inquiry. The additional objectives are to increase critical thinking, hone reading and writing skills, expand vocabulary, and build presentation skills. Woven into all of this is the understanding that research can be a valuable, if not essential, component of making - each informing and enriching the other. The focus of the spring seminar shifts to writing and presentation as an integral part of both studio and professional practice. Each spring brings a new team of guest instructors who introduce various modes of writing as a means to mine, develop and articulate ideas in a concise and authentic manner, and, to further hone that information into artist statements, written theses, and public presentations. Throughout the term writing will be the vehicle in which to move between private and public realms. This journey will begin with 'automatic writings' and culminate with your public artist presentations.

GRADUATE STUDIO 2

In the second sequence of Graduate Studio, first-year graduates continue to take risks and think independently; identify and gain insight into their creative influences; and successfully direct and shape their ideas. Class exercises are given with clear, open-ended themes. Course content focuses on clarity of intention, artistic authorship, the presentation and framing of ones work, awareness of ones contemporaries, etc. Faculty and students consider individual approaches for the execution of work, from the initial concept to the finished piece. In an effort to arrive at original, personally authentic work, it is essential that students are open to discussion and willing to investigate (and question) the motivating forces of their work.

JEWELRY INTRODUCTION

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of design and metal fabrication techniques for both jewelry and small objects. Working with precious and non-precious metals, students learn traditional jewelry construction including sawing, filing, forming, soldering, and polishing. A series of structured assignments guide students as they transform their ideas into finished pieces. Solutions for projects are open to enable the student to explore his/her own aesthetic, but taught in a way to insure that students master the basic processes. Lectures on historical and contemporary jewelry supplement, inform, and inspire students' work.

JUNIOR JEWELRY 1

This course emphasizes the refinement of technical and design skills acquired in sophomore level. A variety of new techniques are introduced. The nature of the assignments encourages the development of a personal aesthetic and asks for greater independence in the design process. The structure of the assignments is designed to present formal and conceptual challenges, promote innovative problem solving and individual exploration. Research and ongoing discussions are part of this course.

JUNIOR JEWELRY: FROM CAD TO CAM

This course actively applies programming learned in prerequisite CAD class 'Digital 3d Modeling and Rendering' class, to explore various manufacturing process applicable to jewelry. Students will utilize a variety of CAM options combined with traditional fabricating techniques to develop CAD designs using CNC milling and 3D printing. The path of model making in wax and then casting in metal will be used, as well as using the CAD/CAM technology as a means of making tooling and/or molds. Students will also be encouraged to utilize CAD and CAD/CAM to explore designs in other classes.

JUNIOR: COLOR AS CONTENT

This course is an in-depth exploration of innovative options for the use of color within jewelry design. Demonstrations range from both traditional and new techniques of enameling (first six weeks) to the exploration of resins and rubbers (second six weeks). Class assignments encourage the development of a personal palette and its application in a variety of projects as well as individual experimentation. Emphasis will be equally placed on technical proficiency and the examination of the conceptual connotations and implications inherent to the materials and their processes.

SENIOR J&M DEGREE PROJECT

In the Senior J+M Degree Project students focus on a clearly defined, individually chosen, subject of inquiry for 12 weeks. Seniors are required to take full responsibility for the evolution and articulation of their creative practice. Two faculty serve as DP advisors, meeting weekly with students, to discuss and facilitate the progress of their work. Writing exercises are incorporated into the class to support the relationship between writing and their studio practice. Although seniors must be self-reflective in identifying the individual impulses and motivations in their work, emphasis in review and discussion begins to shift from the voice of the personal to that of the greater collective, context, and role of the audience. The DP culminates in an exhibition at Woods-Gerry Gallery on the RISD campus. Graduation requirements include: CV, professionally documented digital portfolio, artist postcard, and artist/degree project statement.


SENIOR SEMINAR

J+M Senior Seminar serves as a continuum to J+M Junior Seminar. This course focuses on ideas and theories that relate to a professional studio practice in a craft based media or methodology. The information presented in the course will reflect the historical and contemporary development specific to Jewelry & Metalsmithing and its relationship to the field of crafts at large as well as contemporary visual culture. Readings and class discussion will explore critical issues such as the role and responsibility of the artist in today's society, artistic authorship, context and representation, the relationship between the wearer and the audience experience, the body as content and site, etc.

SOPHOMORE JEWELRY 2

The emphasis of this course is on the intricacy and sophistication of metal construction. Technical information is presented in a clear, logical manner facilitating mastery of these essential skills. The class requires effort, patience, accuracy and sensitivity to the material. Each project pairs a technical skill with a search of creative design solutions that are based on individual sources of interests. This increases the challenge of the projects, and encourages growth in students' design awareness and ability, along with furthering technical capabilities. Drawings and models precede all projects. Students are required to maintain an active sketchbook, as well as a notebook with class handouts.

SOPHOMORE JEWELRY DESIGN: TECHNOLOGY AND MAKING

Whether you work with pencil and paper or create drawings on the computer, the tools of a designer are all means by which you can define an idea, create a model, and make a finished piece of jewelry. This course begins with a series of design study assignments, in-class lectures, and technical instruction in Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Using these tools, students learn the fundamentals of image manipulation, illustration, laser cutting, vector graphics, layering, and graphic editing on the computer. Play and experimentation with materials will be expected and by the end of the course, students will have an understanding of how the use of computers combined with handwork can create exceptional pieces of jewelry.

SOPHOMORE SMITHING & JEWELRY

While continuing to perfect and refine processes introduced in Fall's metalsmithing class, students will shift application of these skills (and their experience) to the design and making of jewelry. Class projects will include dual intensions. First, to become capable with newly presented technique in order to identify design potentials offered by the process. Second, to design and make a piece of jewelry that exhibits innovative use of the given process and is reflective of students emerging interests. Fundamentals of stone setting will be incorporated in the final jewelry assignment. Each student is expected to participate during class discussions and critics as the group investigates scale, function, and examines jewelry's inherent relationship to the body.


Computer Equipment + Software:

  • Four PC workstations with ArtCAM Jewelsmith software, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Microsoft Office and internet access
  • Dedicated internet/supply ordering computer
  • Flatbed scanner
  • Bulk slide scanner
  • CAD/CAM
  • CNC milling machines
  • CNC rotary attachment tables
  • 3D probe scanner
  • Use of PC lab with 14 seats and digital projector

Casting Equipment:

  • Burnout kiln
  • Auto centrifuge
  • Wax injector
  • Mold vulcanizers
  • Bell jar vacuum table
  • Alloying electromelts
  • Ingot molds
  • Oxygen/acetylene casting torch

Lapidary Equipment:

  • Lap saw
  • Lap drum sanders
  • Grinding wheel
  • Faceting machine
  • Diamond drill

Enameling Room + Equipment:

  • Enameling kilns (16x16x11", 6x6x6", 4x4x5")
  • Broad array of types and colors of enamel

Forging Room + Equipment:

  • 200+ stakes, various sizes
  • 100+ hammers, various shapes and sizes
  • Annealing torches
  • Stump-mounted vices
  • Anvils
  • Jump shear
  • Beverly shear

Electroforming Equipment:

  • Copper electroforming tanks with digital rectifiers
  • Spray booth for conductive paint

Machine Room:

  • Band saws
  • Drill presses
  • 12" Disk sander
  • Spindle sander
  • Belt sander
  • Slip roller
  • 12" Finger brake
  • Engine lathe
  • Mini lathe
  • Electric rolling mill
  • Polishing machines
  • Bench grinder
  • Pneumatic grinding tools
  • Sand blaster

Additional Facilities:

  • Dedicated room for elective classes
  • Dedicated pitch booth and torch
  • Hall display cases
  • Slide archives
  • Draw horse
  • Fusion welder
  • Magnetic finishing machine
  • Vibratory tumbler
  • Ultrasonic cleaner
  • Photo lights
  • Hydraulic press
  • Light table
  • Mini torches





Extracurricular Activities

  • The Cook Book
  • Food Appreciation Society
  • Black Artists and Designers
  • Track and field
  • Rock climbing
  • Volleyball

Dining

http://www.risd.edu/Students/Dining/Meal_Plan/

Meal plans:

The Foundation Plan provides unlimited meal swipes to The Met, RISD’s “All-You-Care-To-Eat” facility. Students on the Foundation Plan may choose to use one meal swipe per day at the Portfolio, Watermark, or Jolly Roger, or may purchase items using their Dining Points. Students on the Foundation Plan receive a total of $500 Dining Points per year. Other benefits include 6 guest meals per year (3 per semester), two free exchangeable to-go (Ozzi) containers per year, and a complimentary celebration cake for birthdays or other celebrations! Note: All first year students participate in this plan. Also, this is the recommended plan for students planning on traveling during winter session.

The Residential Plan provides 2 meal swipes per day which can be used to access The Met, RISD’s “All-You-Care-To-Eat” facility, or to purchase a meal at the Portfolio, Watermark, or Jolly Roger. Meals do not accumulate day to day. Students on the Residential Plan also get $1500 Dining Points per year (the equivalent of $45 Dining Points per week) which rollover from semester to semester and are loaded at $750 increments at the start of each semester. Other benefits include 6 guest meals per year (3 per semester), two free exchangeable to-go (Ozzi) containers per year, and a complimentary celebration cake for birthdays or other celebrations! To order your complimentary celebration cake, complete this

form

.

The Flex 7-60 Plan provides blocks of 120 meal swipes per semester, which can be used to access The Met, the Portfolio, Watermark, or Jolly Roger. Students on the Flex 7-60 plan also get a total of $2,000 Dining Points per year (approximately $60 per week), which rollover from semester to semester, meals do not roll over. Points are loaded at $1,000 increments at the start of each semester. Other benefits include 6 guest meals per year (3 per semester), and two free exchangeable to-go (Ozzi) containers.

The Flex 5-40 Plan provides blocks of 90 meal swipes per semester, which can be used to access The Met, the Portfolio, Watermark, or Jolly Roger. Students on the Flex 5-40 Plan also get a total of $1,400 Dining Points per year (approximately $40 per week), which rollover from semester to semester, meals do not roll over. Points are added at $700 increments at the start of each semester. Other benefits include 6 guest meals per year (3 per semester), and two free exchangeable to-go (Ozzi) containers.

The Connect 3-25 Plan is designed for Graduate, Upper-class (senior and 5th year) and Commuter students who want to stay connected to RISD and take advantage of RISD Dining at discounted rates. The Connect 3-25 Plan provides blocks of 50 meal swipes per semester (this averages 3 meal swipes per week), which can be used to access The Met, RISD’s “All-You-Care-To-Eat” facility, the Portfolio, Watermark or Jolly Roger. Students on the Connect 3-25 Plan also get a total of $850 Dining Points per year (average $25 per week), which are loaded at the start of each semester. Other benefits include 6 guest meals per year (3 per semester), and two free exchangeable to-go (Ozzi) containers.

Housing

http://www.risd.edu/Students/Residence_Life/

http://www.risd.edu/Students/Housing/RISD_Spaces/

First year Housing spaces

East Hall:

This building provides suite-style accommodation to about 84 students, housed in suites containing 4-5 double rooms and several individual baths. East is connected on each floor directly to Nickerson Hall. Also, RISD Card Services occupies the ground floor of this building.

Facilities include: Kitchen | Laundry Room | Work Rooms | Soda Machine | Common Area/TV Lounge

Homer Hall:

Homer provides a home to 158 first year students, mostly in double rooms. This traditional corridor style residence hall steps up the hillside so individual floor sizes range from 8 rooms to as many as 20. Homer connects directly to Nickerson Hall on one end and South Hall on the other, as well as offering an interior connection to the dining hall. In addition to the typical amenities in the Quad, Homer offers a games area and a computer lab, and also houses RISD’s Health Services.

Facilities include: Kitchen | Laundry Room | Work Rooms | Computer Lab | Soda Machine | Common Area/TV Lounge | Game Room

Nickerson Hall:

This traditional corridor style hall offers a mix of single, double, and triple rooms to 116 students. Most floors have about 30 residents. Located near the crest of College Hill, many of the rooms have nice views of the city or look onto “Nickerson Green” a popular recreation green space during warmer weather.

Facilities include: Laundry Room | Work Rooms | Soda Machine | Common Area/TV Lounge | Game Room

South Hall:

This building provides suite style living for about 70 students. In each suite 6-10 freshmen share a common entry/lounge area and several individual bathrooms. South offers both double and single rooms. Residence Life and Public Safety have their offices on the first floor of this building.

Facilities include: Kitchen | Laundry Room | Work Room | Soda Machine | Common Area/TV Lounge

Carpenter House:

Boasting such features as high ceilings, decorative fireplaces and a gracious entry foyer, this mid 19th century house now provides a home for 24 students in two triple rooms, eight double rooms and two single rooms. It is located across Angell Street from the 1st Year Quad and is situated next door to our other freshman house Pardon Miller.

Facilities include: Kitchen | Laundry Room | Work Room | Common Area/TV Lounge | Piano

Pardon Miller House:

Pardon Miller House was built in 1822 and was completely renovated for student housing about 10 years ago and since that time has been home to 20 first year students in one quad room, one triple room, six double rooms, and one single room. Pardon Miller House is one of two freshman houses and located directly across the street from the First Year Quad and RISD Dining.

Facilities include: Kitchen | Laundry Room | Work Room | Common Area/TV Lounge


Hill homes

Barstow House:

Always popular with upperclass students, this ca. 1840 house offers 10 singles, three doubles, and two triple rooms for 22 residents. The sunny rooms with high ceilings, large entry hall and common lounge help make this an active, community-oriented house.

Congdon House:

Jonathan Congdon completed the first part of this house around 1818. The ensuing years have seen many changes, additions and renovations, while retaining much historic charm. The largest of our houses, it provides 11 singles, 10 doubles and one triple room to 34 students. This house is large enough so students can find a quiet corner to work or study, or choose to socialize in the lounge. On the corner of Congdon and Angell Streets, this house is well situated to take advantage of RISD's academic facilities on the lower campus or the social and commercial of Brown University.

Dexter House:

Built for Ebenezer Knight Dexter in 1817, this house was completely renovated for student use, while preserving much of its architectural character. 11 singles, four doubles, and one triple room provide space for 22 students. Conveniently located on historic Benefit Street, this house is flanked by two other RISD Residence Halls, Colonial Apartments and Dwight House.

Dunnell House:

Described by the Rhode Island Historical Preservation Commission as “one of the best shingle-style houses in the state”, and “one of the East Side’s architectural gems”, Dunnell House’s 1884 design exudes charm and warmth, inside and out. The smallest of our houses, Dunnell provides 4 singles, six doubles, and one triple room for 19 students. Just off the corner of Benefit and Angell Streets, you’ll find this house convenient to all of RISD’s many resources.

Larned House:

Larned House’s six double and nine single rooms offer 21 students a warm friendly home known for its community atmosphere. This house is conveniently located next to RISD’s Met dining hall, the green spaces of Nickerson Green and Woods-Gerry Mansion, and is also across the street from Brown University.

Nightingale House:

This mid 19th century house is located across the street from RISD’s Woods-Gerry Mansion in a quiet, residential part of the campus. Also convenient to Brown University and the lively, college-oriented retail area of Thayer Street, this house provides 10 singles, five doubles, and two tiple rooms for 26 residents. The historic architecture features high ceilings, hardwood floors and large windows in a comfortable environment that allow residents to choose their privacy or socialize with other students in the large central lounge.


15 West

Alcove Suites:

Located on floors 3, 4 and 5, Alcove Suites feature two sleeping/living rooms (single, double, and triple rooms) that share an entry, bathroom and small kitchenette with a sink, refrigerator and two-burner cooktop. The double and triple rooms in these suites have a sleeping alcove for each student with its own floor-to-ceiling drape. Allowing for a higher degree of privacy in a shared room. Each of the three Alcove floors house approximately 70 students.

Facilities include: Kitchen | Laundry Room | Work Rooms | Vending Machines | Common Area/TV Lounge | Central Air/Heat

Apartments:

These apartment style units occupy floors 6, 7, 8 and 9. The units provide a private bedroom in a three or four bedroom apartment. Students living in these units share a generous common lounge/dining area and full kitchen. Common areas are furnished with soft seating, a TV, and a dining table and chairs. Bedrooms contain an extra-long twin bed, dresser, desk and chair.

Facilities include: Kitchen | Laundry Room | Work Rooms | Vending Machines | Common Area/TV Lounge | Central Air/Heat

Lofts:

Floors 10 and 11 house the lofts. All units have an open living space and a private bathroom. The mini-loft features a snack area with a small fridge and space for a microwave, a bed, dresser, and table and chair. The studio loft features more space, adds a two-burner cooktop to the kitchen, and has either a double or twin bed. The double loft is suitable for two to share and adds a full kitchen with dishwasher, a furnished dining area and lounge area and double bed (or two twins). Also, some of the double lofts can be combined with an adjacent mini-loft. Finally the two-bedroom loft is comprised of 2 single bedrooms sharing a kitchen, dining area and bathroom.

Facilities include: Full Kitchen (Double and Studio Lofts) | Laundry Room | Vending Machines | Central Air/Heat


Benefit Streets Apartments

Colonial Apartments:

123 students occupy this three and four-story, tapestry-brick, apartment building. The “U” floor plan represents three separate buildings (A, B, & C), each with their own entrances. Organized around a courtyard, the building was recently renovated and features two and three bedroom shared apartment units, as well as private studio apartments. Each sleeping area is provided with an extra-long twin bed, desk, chair, and dresser. The two-bedroom units tend to have less common space and more bedroom space than the three-bedroom units, which feature a larger kitchen/living areas and smaller bedrooms.

Facilities include: Kitchens in units | Laundry Room

Dwight House:

25 students occupy the studio and two-bedroom apartment units in this completely renovated 1879 Victorian “double house.” Its convenient location and the prevalence of individual units help create a quiet atmosphere and promote a sense of community amongst many of the building’s residents. Each studio unit features a combination living/sleeping, cooking area, and its own bathroom. Each bedroom in the basement-level, two-bedroom units has its own private entrance, with a kitchen and bathroom area shared between the bedrooms. Each sleeping area of the house is provided with an extra-long twin bed, desk, chair, and dresser.

Facilities include: Kitchens in units | Laundry Room


Financial Aid Plan

http://www.risd.edu/admissions/student-financial-services/types-of-aid/outside-scholarships/

External/outside scholarships are an excellent way to help reduce your need to work and/or borrow student loans while at RISD. Keep in mind that federal regulations stipulate that an outside scholarship cannot be used to reduce your family's expected contribution. When you receive an outside scholarship, our office is required to reevaluate your financial aid package and account for the additional resource.

Contacts

401-454-6100

Why is RISD a good fit for me?

RISD is a good fit for me because I can major in courses that will help me succeed in my career as a fashion designer, such as apparel design and jewelry and metalsmithing. RISD is in the top five highest ranked design schools. RISD is also a liberal arts college, which gives me the option to experience new things and take different classes.This college also has variety of courses to take in my desired program, which is a great way to get more experience in the fashion industry. Lastly, RISD is a college that allows students to express themselves and use and show their creativity through a variety of clubs, organizations, and programs.

FIDM: About

FIDM offers 26 accredited Bachelor’s and Associate Degree programs in design and creative business. Our students collaborate on special Industry Partner Projects with brands like bebe, Murad, Athleta, Signal Snowboards, Lacoste, GUESS, and TOMS. Part-time work and Internships with companies like J Brand Jeans, Stila, BCBG, and The Hunger Games movies are built into the curriculum. FIDM Faculty are talented industry professionals who bring their experience and connections into the classroom, creating a dynamic, career-focused learning environment.
Big image

Majors

http://fidm.edu/en/majors/advanced+fashion+design/

Students in the Advanced Fashion Design program spend nine intensive months becoming professional fashion designers. Mentored by industry pros, students design their very own runway collection and learn how to launch a fashion label. The elite experience culminates in DEBUT, our annual runway show that attracts over 10,000 people across three days. Advanced Fashion Design program students have gone on to become founders of world-renowned couture, ready-to-wear, and action sports brands; as well as head designers and creative directors for global apparel companies. Designers Monique Lhuillier, Kevan Hall, and Leanne Marshall earned their degrees and launched their careers at DEBUT.


Career Opportunities after FIDM in the fashion industry:

  • Trend Forecaster
  • Senior Patternmaker
  • Head designer
  • Senior Production manager

http://fidm.edu/en/majors/beauty+industry+merchandising+and+marketing/

FIDM's unique concentrated program in beauty merchandising has been compared to a Master's in beauty product development. Students collaborate to develop a new product or service and then present it to professionals from hair, makeup, fragrance, and wellness companies. Internships with top beauty brands include Smashbox, Urban Decay, Orly, and Lorac. Each student graduates with a professional portfolio showcasing his or her work.


Career Opportunities after FIDM in the beauty industry, merchandising, and marketing:

  • Brand Management
  • Sales Management
  • Product development
  • Retail Management
  • Communications and promotions

Extracurriular activities

  • The Industry Club
  • FIDM Mode

Dining

N/A

Housing

Los Angeles- The Metropolitan

The Metropolitan is located right across the street from FIDM in downtown Los Angeles. The apartment building features a 24-hour doorman and a card-access system. Facilities include a fitness center, a pool and two hydro-massage spas, a recreation room with movie viewing/large screen TV room, and a landscaped garden. There is an on-site study room with 4 drafting tables, sewing room with dress forms and convenient laundry facilities. Each FIDM unit includes furniture, utilities, cable, internet-access and quarterly cleaning. Food, parking and telephone services are not included.

Los Angeles- The Medici

The beautiful Medici has a "Tuscan" feeling. This property is located only 6 blocks from FIDM (public transportation available) and houses over 600 units. It is a card-access building with underground parking. Amenities include pool, saunas, tanning rooms , state-of-the-art fitness center, a private one-acre park with volleyball and tennis courts, putting green and golf driving ranges. Services include a business center, rent-a-car service and concierge service. A washer and dryer is included in each unit. Each FIDM unit includes furniture, utilities, cable, internet-access and quarterly cleaning. Food, parking and telephone services are not included.

Los Angeles- The Piero

The beautiful Piero I & II share the same parent company as the Medici and have the same "European" feeling throughout the property. It is located approximately 7 city blocks (0.8 miles) from FIDM and recently added a second building in 2012, increasing its count to 560 units. It is an electronic key/ card-access building with underground parking and 24 -hour security. Amenities include junior Olympic-sized heated pool, tanning rooms , state-of-the-art fitness center and saunas, peaceful meditation gardens, and resident lounge with a full kitchen. Services include a business center, rent-a-car service, and concierge service. A washer and dryer are included in each unit. Each FIDM unit includes furniture, utilities, cable, internet-access and quarterly cleaning. Food, parking, and telephone services are not included.

Los Angeles- Level Furnished Living

This property is located only 1 block away from FIDM and consists of 303 fully furnished suites/apartments that blend the comfort of residential living with the convenience of luxury hotel services and state-of-the-art amenities. Units include a full kitchen with utensils, in-suite washer and dryer, as well as, weekly housekeeping services. Residents will have access to a 24 hour concierge service and L Club - an expansive 37,000 sq. ft. indoor and outdoor amenity floor that includes a lounge area with BBQ's and fire pits, a spacious fitness center, basketball court, and an outdoor heated pool with hot tub, steam room and sauna pavilion. Each FIDM unit includes furniture, utilities, cable, internet-access and quarterly cleaning. Food, parking and telephone services are not included.

Financial Aid Plan

Full Scholarships- First year only


FIDM National Scholarship Competition:

Win a Full Year of Tuition (High School Seniors, Graduates & College Transfers Only)

This scholarship for new students offers a full one-year scholarship to one student in each of the following seven categories:

• Fashion Executive of Tomorrow (Merchandise Marketing)
• Interior Designer of Tomorrow
• Graphic Designer of Tomorrow
• Fashion Designer of Tomorrow
• Visual Designer of Tomorrow
• Digital Media Artist of Tomorrow
• Trend Spotter of Tomorrow (Merchandise Product Development)

Additionally, there are $5,000 scholarships awarded to three finalists in each category.

FIDM Fashion Club Scholarship:

High School Juniors & Seniors

Win a Full Year of Tuition (High School Juniors)
Win a $5,000 Scholarship (High School Seniors)

Any student member of an approved FIDM Fashion Club Chapter (Club Leader/Club Member) is eligible to enter the My FIDM Fashion Club Scholarship Competition in the spring of his/her junior and senior years.

• One winner is selected from entrants in their junior year to receive a one-year full scholarship to attend FIDM after completing the senior year.
• Additionally, two winners are selected from entrants in their senior year, and each winner receives a $5,000 scholarship.

FHA-HERO/Future Homemakers of America - Home Economics Related Occupations Scholarship:

Win a Full Year of Tuition (High School Juniors & Seniors)


Two full one-year scholarships toward tuition, books, and most supplies are given to the First Place winners in Fashion Design and Interior Design, selected by FHA-HERO in their statewide (California) competition.

FCCLA/Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America Scholarship:

Win a Full Year of Tuition (High School Juniors & Seniors)

First Place winners in the Senior and Occupational Divisions of the National Leadership Conference STAR events in Fashion Design and Fashion Construction are awarded a full one-year scholarship toward tuition, books, and most supplies.

FIDM Fashion Club Presidential Scholarship:

High School Seniors)

This $4,000 scholarship opportunity is open to all Presidents of FIDM's official Fashion Clubs. To be eligible for this scholarship, the graduating President must hand the club over to a new President for the following school year. The deadline for seniors to complete their Fashion Club application is December 31. Learn more about this opportunity at FashionClub.com.

FIDM Fashion Club "Active Member" Scholarship:

(High School Juniors & Seniors)

Official FIDM Fashion Club student members (Club Leader/Club Member) who have attended 8 or more FIDM Fashion Club meetings during the academic year in which their FIDM Application is submitted are eligible to receive a $2,000 scholarship. Information is available at FashionClub.com.

Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship:


(College Transfers)

Phi Theta Kappa is the national honor society for Associate of Arts Degree granting colleges. Students who transfer to FIDM, having been a qualified Phi Theta Kappa member at another 2-year college, may receive a $3,000 scholarship toward their initial year at FIDM. Only students who come to FIDM with the Phi Theta Kappa designation achieved at their prior college are eligible for the award and the renewal possibilities.

Academic Merit Scholarship:

(High School Seniors, Graduates & College Transfers)

Students must demonstrate academic achievement (GPA and course rigor evaluation) through Admissions application materials. Additional essay required. Amounts vary.

Artistic/Industry Merit Scholarship:

(High School Seniors, Graduates & College Transfers)

Students with a minimum 2.75 GPA must demonstrate artistic achievement and/or demonstrate extensive industry background through Admissions application materials. Additional essay required. Amounts vary.

FIDM College Transfer Merit Scholarship:

(College Transfer Students only)

This scholarship opportunity is open to college transfer students (A.A. or higher) from a U.S. accredited college who demonstrate academic achievement through Admissions application materialsAdditional essay required. Amounts vary.

FIDM Professional Designation Merit Scholarships:


(College Graduates)

This scholarship opportunity is open to college graduates (A.A. or higher) from a U.S. accredited college who demonstrate academic achievement through Admissions application materials.Additional essay required. Amounts vary.

etc.

Contact

800-624-1200

Why is FIDM a good fit for me?

FIDM is a good fit for me because it is a college all about fashion. FIDM is has a great reputation in the fashion industry for being the college with high end brand partnerships and notable alumni. FIDM's tuition is also affordable, while offering financial aid and scholarships. FIDM combines marketing and merchandising with fashion, design, art, and beauty, which is the perfect match for my career. Lastly, FIDM has a location in Los Angeles where I eventually plan to live.

Fashion Institute of Technology: About

One of New York City's premier public institutions, FIT is an internationally recognized college for design, fashion, art, communications, and business. We're known for our rigorous, unique, and adaptable academic programming, experiential learning opportunities, academic and industry partnerships, and commitment to research, innovation, and entrepreneurship.
Big image

Majors

http://www.fitnyc.edu/fashion-design/index.php

For many people around the world, fashion education means just one thing: FIT. Our Fashion Design program—one of FIT's original degree programs—has been preparing students for success at every level, from haute couture to ready-to-wear to mass market, for 65 years.The program keeps evolving along with fashion itself, but some FIT traditions are forever: First, our close ties to the industry let us immerse you in what's happening now in this fast-changing field. And our own brand of fashion education nurtures your creativity while providing a rigorous grounding in the practical and technical skills needed for career success, exposing you to the real demands and practices of the fashion world.You'll learn the fundamentals of professional draping, patternmaking, and sewing techniques. You'll master computer-aided design (CAD), and learn how to take a design from concept to finished garment. This singular program guides you to become not only a designer with your own creative vision, but a professional prepared to take your place in this challenging industry.

http://www.fitnyc.edu/cfm/index.php

Looking and feeling good is essentially about emotion: our powerful and very personal desire to enhance our well-being and show our best self to the world. No wonder the beauty business is a multibillion-dollar—and growing—global industry. In this program, you learn how to create and market products that women, and increasingly men, want to buy. Your FIT education blends academic study and hands-on experience, and includes a strong foundation in liberal arts, required for a marketing career. A faculty of practicing professionals and industry mentors expose you to all facets of the business, from product development and manufacturing to marketing and sales.You'll gain an understanding of international economics, strategic marketing, visual presentation, and communications management. The program's close ties to industry ensure that you're immersed in the standards and practices of the beauty business, and help you make connections that pave the way to a successful career in this challenging and rewarding field.


Extracurricular Activities

  • Black Retail Action Group
  • Black Student Union
  • Blush Magazine
  • Christian Fellowship
  • Cosmetics and Fragrance Marketing Association
  • Creative Movement Club
  • Culinary Arts Club
  • FIT Models and Stylists Association
  • FIT Outreach
  • Half the sky
  • Runway27

Dining

https://fit.campusdish.com/Commerce/Catalog/ShopSubCategory.aspx?category=All_Products_7827&lid=7827&root=Meal_Plan

Meal plans

Add Declining Balance

Add any amount of Declining Balance. Minimum purchase requirement is $50.00.


19 Plus

The 19 Plus meal plan gives you 19 meals to use per week at Dubinsky Dining Hall. The 19 Plus comes with $160 Declining Balance to use at our fast casual restaurants. Declining Balance are associated to meal plans will carry forward to Spring when Spring meal plan is purchased.

14 Plus

The 14 Plus meal plan gives you 14 meals to use per week at Dubinsky Dining Hall. The 14 Plus comes with $110 Declining Balance to use at our fast casual restaurants. Declining Balance are associated to meal plans will carry forward to Spring when Spring meal plan is purchased.


9 Plus

The 9 Plus meal plan gives you 9 meals to use per week at Dubinsky Dining Hall. The 9 Plus comes with $210 Declining Balance to use at our fast casual restaurants. Declining Balance are associated to meal plans will carry forward to Spring when Spring meal plan is purchased.

Freedom Plan

The Freedom Plan offers $2,233 Declining balance to be used at any of our locations, 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. Make sure you have what you need to buy what you want!

$300 All DB

The $300 All DB Plan offers $300 Declining balance to be used at any of our locations, 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. Make sure you have what you need to buy what you want!

Housing

http://www.fitnyc.edu/residential-life/residence-halls/index.php


Coed Hall (27th Street)

Coed Hall is an air conditioned, fifteen story, co-educational residential building.

The first 10 floors consist of approximately 160 double and triple occupancy rooms, measuring approximately 12' wide by 20' long. Floors 11 - 15 consist of double and quad occupancy suites. The suites have private bathrooms and kitchens, while the traditional style, double and triple occupancy rooms share common facilities with their floor mates.

The basement holds a large laundry room, two work/study rooms, a TV/game lounge and a kitchen.

Nagler Hall (27th Street)

Nagler Hall houses female students in a 10-story, traditional residence hall style setting.

Floors 2 - 10 each have a community bathroom and a laundry room with a washer, dryer and refrigerator. Double occupancy rooms have an open, wooden room divider that separates the room down the middle. Each room measures approximately 10' wide by 20' long. There are also a very limited number of air conditioned suites; each has a private bathroom andkitchen.

There is a TV lounge/work room and kitchen on the first floor.


Alumni Hall (27th Street)

Alumni Hall is an air conditioned, eighteen-story, co-educational residential building.

The first floor of the building houses the Residential Life Office and a student work room facility complete with vending machines. Floors 2 - 17 each have a laundry room serving the eight suites on that floor.

Each suite has two bedrooms, a bathroom, a common dining and kitchen area, and houses four students. Each bedroom measures approximately 14' wide by 8' long.

Kaufman Hall (31st Street)

This 320,000 square foot, 15-story building, offers one-, two-, three-, and four-bed loft-style suites. FIT's 27th Street campus is just a short walk away.

Kaufman Hall is home to our returning residents. This new air conditioned hall which opened in 2006 houses approximately 1100 students. All of the apartments have private bathrooms and kitchens. Kaufman Hall also has a study and cyber lounge with high-speed internet connection and a fitness center.



Financial Aid Plan

http://www.fitnyc.edu/financial-aid/programs/fit-scholarships-grants.php

Scholarships and grants are awarded from funds donated to the

FIT Foundation

by many firms, organizations, and individuals.

FIT Scholarships, which may carry the name of the donor, are usually awarded to second-, third-, and fourth-year students who demonstrate need, superior potential to succeed in their major areas, and meet the donor's requirements for the scholarship. Students must complete the FAFSA each year by the March 1 deadline and must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA. Renewal of scholarships is not guaranteed. All recipients must be registered for a minimum of 12 credits and continue to be full-time.

FIT grants are based on financial need and availability of funds. Renewal is based on full-time enrollment (12 or more credits), maintaining a 2.3 GPA and availability of funds. Recipients must file for financial aid each academic year by March 1. These grants are limited to four semesters in lower division and four semesters in upper division.

Why is FIT a good fit for me?

FIT is a good fit for me because it is a fashion college. FIT has a great reputation in the fashion industry. It partners with a variety of brands in the industry. FIT also has notable alumni such as Michael kors and Calvin Klein. FIT is located in New York, which is the heart of fashion.

Parsons school of design: About

Parsons school of design has offered innovative approaches to education since its founding in 1896. Today we're the only American art and design school within a comprehensive university, The New School, which also houses a rigorous liberal arts college and a progressive performing arts school. Our undergraduate and graduate programs, offered through Parsons five schools, immerse students in focused training, interdisciplinary inquiry, and practice based collaborative bases learning.
Big image

Majors

http://www.newschool.edu/parsons/bfa-fashion-design/

This innovative program has trained five generations of designers who have shaped the global industry. Employing design thinking and creative problem-solving strategies, you explore form, silhouette, material, and process—including social and environmental imperatives—to create beautiful, sustainable, and responsible fashion for a complex and evolving field. You are encouraged to explore the broadest contexts and applications of the field.

http://www.newschool.edu/parsons/mfa-fashion-design-society/

The MFA Fashion Design and Society at Parsons School of Design is the first graduate program of its kind in the United States, with a unique interdisciplinary and international approach to fashion. Each year, a small group of students join this academy for advanced studies in fashion design and train to become innovative and progressive world-class designers. Initiated by Parsons alumna Donna Karan, the program has received support from major names in fashion such as Diane von Furstenberg, Swarovski, Uniqlo, LVMH, and Kering.

ExtracurrIcular Activities

N/A

Dining

http://www.newschool.edu/card/dining-dollars/

Unlike a conventional meal plan, Dining Dollars offers complete flexibility in what and when you choose to eat in the cafeterias. When you are ready to pay for your meal, swipe your newcard at the cash register, and the cost of the transaction will be deducted from your Dining Dollars account. Note that under New York State tax law, sponsored meal plans like Dining Dollars are exempt from sales tax. Any money left in your Dining Dollars account at the end of the fall semester will roll forward to the spring semester, but balances remaining at the end of the spring semester are forfeited. If a student moves out of a Dining Dollars residence before the end of the school year, a partial refund may be granted, depending on the circumstances. Refunds are issued by Student Accounts, not Student Housing.

Housing

http://www.newschool.edu/student-housing/residences/

Residence Halls


Kerrey Hall - New York:

Kerrey Hall

, the university’s newest residence, is located at the top of the LEED-certified University Center building at Fifth Avenue and 14th Street. It includes fully furnished suites, primarily featuring double-occupancy rooms, with bathrooms, kitchens, and large common spaces, as well as a bike storage area.

13th Street Residence - New York:

The

13th Street Residence

is located between Sixth and Seventh Avenues, close to the New School campus. Primarily a freshman residence, it features single, double, and quad rooms, along with a professional student life staff and house activities, a cafeteria, and an outdoor patio.

Stuyvesant Park Residence - New York:

The New School’s largest hall,

Stuyvesant Park

is located on 15th Street near Second Avenue and primarily houses freshmen in singles, doubles, and triples. Amenities includes a gym, a private courtyard, state-of-the-art laundry facilities, and a dedicated art studio for spray-painting

Loeb Hall - New York:

Situated on 12th Street near Third Avenue,

Loeb Hall

houses students mainly in double rooms (although a few singles are available). Loeb features extensive resident life programming, a 24-hour art studio with a special spray-painting area, and a private deck.

20th Street Residence - New York:

Located on Eighth Avenue in the Chelsea neighborhood, the

20th Street Residence

is home to many junior and senior undergraduates and graduate students. It includes fully furnished suites with kitchens and a bathroom. Students can stay in single, double, and triple bedrooms. Building amenities include a fitness center, television lounge, study room, art studio, and music practice rooms in the lower level. There is also outdoor patio access with a community garden

Finacial Aid Plan

http://www.newschool.edu/student-financial-services/scholarships-and-grants/

The New School maintains an extensive program of scholarships and grants-in-aid based on academic merit and demonstrated financial need. Awards are usually made as part of the admission process. Institutional scholarships may be combined with government supported grants and loans in a single financial aid package. Scholarships and grants are normally applied to tuition costs. They can range from several hundred dollars to full tuition and do not require repayment.

Scholarships may be reduced or canceled if requested applications and verification documents are not received by the stated deadlines. Need-based scholarships do not automatically renew for the same amount in subsequent years. Changes in need calculations, late FAFSA submission, or refusal of a subsidized student loan may result in a modified award.

Undergraduate Students

  • U.S. citizens and permanent residents must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to be considered for a financial aid package.
  • International students in the NSPE undergraduate program or a Parsons AAS program must file the Undergraduate International Student Scholarship Applications to be considered for financial aid.
  • There is no separate aid application for other international undergraduates.

All undergraduate students are considered for scholarships based on their academic merit. Availability of institutional merit-based scholarships varies according to academic program. Students who file FAFSA or the Undergraduate International Student Scholarship Application will be considered for institutional scholarships based on merit and demonstrated financial need. U.S. citizens and eligible residents may qualify for U.S. government and New York State fellowships and grants based on merit and financial need.

Graduate Students

Applicants for graduate school who are seeking financial aid should notify their prospective academic department early in the application process. Graduate students are automatically considered for university merit-based scholarships and fellowships as part of the admission process. Note however: For U.S. citizens and permanent residents, limited scholarship funds are usually combined with government supported grants and loans in a financial aid package, so applicants must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Graduate students are notified of their scholarship awards soon after their admission in a letter from either their academic program or Student Financial Services.

Contact

@TheNewSchool

Why is Parsons school of design a good fit for me?

Parsons school of design is a good fit for me because it is a school about designing, which is perfect for my career in the fashion and beauty industry. Parsons has a variety of programs that combine design with society, marketing, history, and merchandising. It is one of the best design colleges in the U.S and includes notabe alumni. It is also located in New York, where there is a plethora of opportunities in the fashion industry. Lastly, the tuition is fairly affordable.