Bilingualism and Home Language Use

Beverly A. Paul * SEI/301 * Dr. K. Kopczynski * 6/15/15

Socio cultural aspects for bilingual students in the classroom

  • Lack of understanding of multiple views, lessons, responsibilities, etc.
  • Characteristics of various languages can be misdiagnosed an/or given inappropriate instruction
  • Additional comfort factor in using native language
  • Varied backgrounds can result in stereotypes, prejudices, and discriminatory behaviors
  • Learning in one culture then learning in another culture can result in some confusion and dislocation during the learning process
  • Language primarily learned in a socio cultural content can be influenced by social and cultural conditions by which one is born and raised (Poplin & Phillips, 1993)

Cultural Impact of bilingualism & home language use

  • Encourage native language speaking at home
  • Better chance at academic success when home language is maintained
  • Teacher can provide information, support, and language resources
  • Encourages discussions about class work and home work with parents
  • Regardless of language, being able to understand and work with ideas and concepts enhances education and academics
  • Strong language foundations enables students to learn, speak, and write English better
  • Ability to share personal experiences
  • Maintain bond to native culture and heritage
  • Bilingualism opens doors to business and cultural opportunities (Language Lizard, 2012)

Strategies & Resources for cultivating home & school partnerships

  • Value the importance of being bilingual
  • Build a shared vision among family, school staff, and the community
  • Encourage parental involvement at home and in the classroom
  • Develop new collaborative relationships with mutual respect, trust, and friendships
  • Build a broad base of support
  • Identify opportunities for sharing resources
  • Participation in joint activities (Molloy, et. al., 1995)

Strategies for evaluating the effectiveness of the home & school partnerships

  • Utilize partnerships that are committed to accomplishing a goal
  • Involve structure, flexibility, trust, and confidence
  • Provide effective leadership
  • Encourage parental involvement at home and in the classroom
  • Value the importance of being bilingual
  • Provide mutually beneficial interactions between diverse partners
  • Work to improve programs, policies and practices (Harvard Family Research Project, 2005)

The role of leadership in cultivating a positive home & school partnership for ELL students

  • Encourage ELL parents to take on leadership roles such as become more familiar with school policies and the environment
  • Encourage parents and partners to advocate for school programming and/or improvements
  • Encourage parent advisory groups and PTA groups
  • Take on teacher and administration leadership roles by becoming familiar with new cultures and different environments
  • Understand the necessity for professional development and the impact it will have on becoming a better teacher
  • Encourage leadership from school partnerships and communities to improve programs and opportunities for ELL students such as inviting local services to the school to discuss their services , organizations, and/or opportunities (Breiseth, 2011)
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References

Breiseth, L. (2100). A guide for engaging ELL families: Twenty strategies for school learners. Retrieved on June 11, 2015 from http://www.colorincolorado,org/pdfs/guides/Engaging-ELL-Families.pdf


Harvard Family Research. (2005). Evaluating partnerships: Seven success factors. Retrieved on June 11, 2015 from http://www.hfrp.org/evaluation/the-evaluation-exchange/issue-archive/complementary-learning/evaluating-partnerships-seven-success-factors


Images. (2015). Various images. Retrieved on June 11, 2015 from http://www.search.yahoo.com


Language Lizard. (2102). Supporting bilingualism-4 reasons parents should speak heritage language at home. Retrieved on June 11, 2015 from http://www.blog.languagelizard.com/2012/01/11/supporting-bilingualism-4-reasons-parents-should-speak-heritage-language-at-home/


Molloy, P., Fleming, G., Rodrigues, C., Saavedra, N., Tucker, B., Williams, D. (1995). Building home school community partnerships: The planning phase. Retrieved on June 11, 2015 from http://www.sedl.org/pubs/fam01/planning.pdf


Poplen, M. & Phillips, L. ((1993). Socio cultural aspects of language and learning. Retrieved on June 11, 2015 from http://www.jstor.org/stable/1511334?seq=1#page_scar_tab_contents