Plan To Overthrow The Master

Act III Scene II

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Director

This is important because it helps the audience to visualize and understand the play but it is also important because it connects with what my group is going to present next. An important part of this section is when Stephano, Caliban and Trinculo is talking about plotting against Prospero's death and Ariel over hears and tells the master.


Ariel- Kendra

Stephano- Kat

Trinculo- David

Caliban- Pedro

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Theme

Revenge is necessary in order to forgive someone.

-To revenge against a person. who has done you wrong and then forgive them.


"As I told thee before, I am subject to a tyrant, a sorcerer, that by his cunning hath cheated me of the island (Shakespeare, 23)."

Translation: "As I told you before, I’m enslaved to a tyrant, a magician who tricked me with magic spells and took my island from me."


"I say, by sorcery he got this isle.From me he got it. If thy greatness will Revenge it on him for I know thou darest, But this thing dare not (Shakespeare, 24)."

Translation: I was telling you he used witchcraft to take this island. He stole it from me. If your highness is willing, take revenge on him for that because I know you’re brave enough, I don’t dare to.


"Why, as I told thee, ’tis a custom with him, I' th' afternoon to sleep. There thou mayst brain him, Having first seized his books; or with a log Batter his skull; or paunch him with a stake; Or cut his weasand with thy knife. Remember First to possess his books, for without them He’s but a sot, as I am, nor hath not One spirit to command. They all do hate him As rootedly as I. Burn but his books. He has brave utensils—for so he calls them— Which when he has a house, he’ll deck withal. And that most deeply to consider is The beauty of his daughter. He himself Calls her a nonpareil. I never saw a woman, But only Sycorax my dam and she. But she as far surpasseth Sycorax As great’st does least. (Shakespeare 24)"

Translation: Just as I told you, he usually sleeps in the afternoon. At that time you can smash in his skull after seizing his books; or you can bash his skull with a log; or you can stab him in the belly; or cut his windpipe. Just remember to grab his books first, since without them he’s just a poor fool like me, and can’t command a single spirit. All the spirits hate him as much as I do. Be sure to burn his magic books. He has some wonderful home furnishings—that’s what he calls them—that he’ll use to decorate his house when he gets one. The most important thing for you to think about is how beautiful his daughter is. He says she has no equal. I never saw a woman except her and Sycorax, my mother. But Miranda is so much more beautiful, you can’t even compare the two.

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Character Analysis

  • Trinculo

- Ignorant

"Lord' quoth he! That a monster should be such a natural!" (Shakespeare 23)

Translation: “Lord,” he calls you? What an idiot that monster is!


- Stern

"Thou liest, most ignorant monster. I am in case to justle a constable. Why, thou deboshed fish, thou, was there ever man a coward that hath drunk so much sack as I today? Wilt thou tell a monstrous lie, being but half a fish and half a monster?" (Shakespeare 23)

Translation: "You’re a liar, you ignorant monster. I’m courageous. I could shake up a police officer right now. You drunken fish, you, how could you call me a coward after all the booze I’ve drunk today? Do you tell such monstrous lies because you’re half fish and half monster?"



  • Caliban

-Cruel

"What a pied ninny’s this!—Thou scurvy patch!—

I do beseech thy greatness, give him blows

And take his bottle from him. When that’s gone,

He shall drink naught but brine, for I’ll not show him

Where the quick freshes are." (Shakespeare 24)

Translation: "What an idiot this guy is!—You’re a rotten piece of work!—I beg your highness, beat him up and take his wine bottle from him. When he loses that, he’ll be drinking salt water, since I’ll never tell him where the freshwater springs are."


-Selfish

"Why, as I told thee, ’tis a custom with him, I' th' afternoon to sleep. There thou mayst brain him, Having first seized his books; or with a log Batter his skull; or paunch him with a stake; Or cut his weasand with thy knife. Remember First to possess his books, for without them.He’s but a sot, as I am, nor hath not One spirit to command. They all do hate him As rootedly as I. Burn but his books. He has brave utensils—for so he calls them— Which when he has a house, he’ll deck withal. And that most deeply to consider is The beauty of his daughter. He himself Calls her a nonpareil. I never saw a woman,

But only Sycorax my dam and she.But she as far surpasseth Sycorax As great’st does least." (Shakespeare 24)

Translation: 'Just as I told you, he usually sleeps in the afternoon. At that time you can smash in his skull after seizing his books; or you can bash his skull with a log; or you can stab him in the belly; or cut his windpipe. Just remember to grab his books first, since without them he’s just a poor fool like me, and can’t command a single spirit. All the spirits hate him as much as I do. Be sure to burn his magic books. He has some wonderful home furnishings—that’s what he calls them—that he’ll use to decorate his house when he gets one. The most important thing for you to think about is how beautiful his daughter is. He says she has no equal. I never saw a woman except her and Sycorax, my mother. But Miranda is so much more beautiful, you can’t even compare the two."



  • Stephano

-Harsh

"Trinculo, if you trouble him any more in ’s tale, by this hand, I will supplant some of your teeth. " (Shakespeare 23)

Translation: "Trinculo, if you interrupt him any more, I swear I’ll knock some teeth out of your head."


-Ruthless

"Monster, I will kill this man. His daughter and I will be king and queen—save our graces!—and Trinculo and thyself shall be viceroys.—Dost thou like the plot, Trinculo?" (Shakespeare 25)

Translation: "Monster, I’ll kill this man. His daughter and I will be king and queen—God protect us!—and you and Trinculo will be our governors.—Do you like that idea, Trinculo?"

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Questions

1- What does Trinculo and Stephano refer to Caliban as? (Hint: its not his name).

Answer: They both refer to him as "monster". Stephano says, "Servant-monster, drink to me"(Shakespeare 23). Trinculo says, "Servant-monster!"(Shakespeare 23).

2- Why does Stephano beat Trinculo?

Answer: Stephano beats Trinculo because he lied. "As you like this, give me the lie another time"(Shakespeare 24).

3- What does Caliban mean by "a thousand twangling instruments when he talks about the island?

Answer: What Caliban means is that there are many noises in the island. "Be not afraid; the isle is full of noises"(Shakespeare 25).

4- What does Stephano sound like when he says "and I will be king and queen"?

Answer: Stephano sounds selfish when he says this because he makes it look like he wants all the power and credit to himself.

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Visualizer

I choose to draw Trinculo, Stephano, and Caliban walking together on the island together drinking as they plot against Prospero's death. I placed an area of glitter to represent Ariel (Prospero's Servant) listening to them while he/she is invisible.
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