Equilibrium Project

By: Cynthia Hall

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Explanation Of SO3(g) + NO (g) -- NO2(g) + SO2 (g)

SO3(g):

Sulfur trioxide is a colorless gaseous compound and it is a primary of acid rain

NO(g):

Nitrogen Oxide is waste that contaminates water or air

NO2(g):

Nitrogen dioxide is a reddish brown gas and has a disgusting odor. Not only that but it is toxic and causes smog

SO2(g):

sulfur dioxide is a heavy, colorless and poisonous gas.

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Good or Bad for the Environment?

This chemical reaction is definitely bad for the environment. The product contains NO2 and SO2 which also contains health hazards for every living thing. Nitrogen Dioxide is a gas that has a horrid smell. This smelly gas is caused by burning fossils. This causes trouble with our respiratory system which can also lead to asthma. Sulfur dioxide is almost the same the as Nitrogen Dioxide because it is created the same and it affects people the same. The result of both of these compounds is Air Pollution.
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Increased Pressure

If you increase the pressure on this equilibrium equation then it will not change because there is the same amount of molecules on the reactants and products side. It has a one to one ratio.
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Increased Temperature

If temperature is increased the equilibrium position will shift to the side that absorbs it. When the reaction of the chemical equation contains the heat it shifts to the products. When the products contains heat it will shift to the reactants.
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Increased Concentration

The Equilibrium will shift to the reactants if I were to add it to the products side. If I add concentration to the reactant's side then it will shift to the products side. This is because concentration affects the moles and the equilibrium will shift to the side with the less moles.
Air Pollution

References

  • "Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)." Department of the Environment. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.
  • "Sulfur Dioxide (SO2)." Department of the Environment. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2015.
  • "Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)." Nitrogen Dioxide. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2015.