Scientific Questionnaire Lab

Riya Mahesh and Tanya Kiatsuranon, 6th Period

Does gender affect the number of books read over summer vacation?

Hypothesis

If 15 girls and 15 boys are asked how many books they read over the summer break, then the girls would've read more books than boys.

Type of Investigation

Comparative Investigation (Boys vs. Girls)

Parts of the Experiment

Independent Variable: Gender

Dependent Variable: Number of Books Read

Control: N/A

Constant: Age (sophomores), the time frame (course of three months)

Data Table

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Bar Graphs

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Analysis

Over summer vacation, sophomore girls read more books than sophomore boys. This trend can be observed from the mean of both data sets. Girls read an average of five books whereas boys read an average of two books. Also, the range of books read by girls was nine, but the range of books read by boys was four. The majority of books only read two books over summer vacation, whereas most girls read four or more. A T-Test was also completed to ensure that there was a significant difference in the data. The P-Value was 0.000914642, which means that there was a significant difference. This can be attributed to cultural influences in society. Boys are steered towards non-literary activities such as sports and video games. They are brought up with the mentality that literacy is a feminine characteristic. At a young age, girls are more patient than boys. Girls have the patience to sit down and read a book, but young boys want instant gratification. This causes a love for reading to be instilled in girls, but not boys. Reading is viewed as a punishment for boys. But, the Harry Potter series has proven to be an exception. 61% of boys agreed that “they had not read books for pleasure before Harry Potter.” This proves that boys can also enjoy books, but they have to search for the right ones. On the other hand, girls have a plethora of books to choose from.



Loveless, Tom. "Girls, Boys, and Reading." The Brookings Institution. Brookings Edu, 24 Mar. 2015. Web. 07 Sept. 2015.


Martin, Jennifer. Designing a Scientific Questionnaire. N.p.: n.p., n.d. PDF.


Mcfann, Jane. "Boys and Books." Reading Rockets. WETA, Aug. 2004. Web. 07 Sept. 2015.


Weiner, Eric. "Why Women Read More Than Men." NPR. NPR, 05 Sept. 2007. Web. 07 Sept. 2015.

Conclusion

The hypothesis was supported, and the purpose of the questionnaire was achieved. Over the summer vacation, sophomore girls did read more books than sophomore boys, as seen through the data collected.

Sources of Inaccuracies/Errors

There were a few sources of error in the experiment. The first noticeable error was due to the personality of the subject, and seeing if they enjoyed reading more or less than others. This proving that they would have a higher chance of reading more or less books over the
summer vacation. The second error was the way the subject had spent their summer vacation. If they spent majority of the vacation outside of their home, then there was a higher chance that they would not read as much over the break, and vice versa for those who stayed home. Lastly, the length of the book could vary throughout the subjects. In the questionnaire, it was never mentioned how long the book should be, so a book that the subject could've counted could vary from a picture book to a textbook, this showing that one who read a textbook throughout the summer could read a total of one book, whilst someone who read a book with fewer pages could've read ten.

Bibliography



Loveless, Tom. "Girls, Boys, and Reading." The Brookings Institution. Brookings Edu, 24 Mar. 2015. Web. 07 Sept. 2015.


Martin, Jennifer. Designing a Scientific Questionnaire. N.p.: n.p., n.d. PDF.


Mcfann, Jane. "Boys and Books." Reading Rockets. WETA, Aug. 2004. Web. 07 Sept. 2015.


Weiner, Eric. "Why Women Read More Than Men." NPR. NPR, 05 Sept. 2007. Web. 07 Sept. 2015.