Eiffel Tower

History of the Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel tower is an iron lattice tower located in Paris. Erected in 1889 as the entrance arch to the 1889 world's fair, it has become both a global cultural icon of France and one of the most recognizable structures in the world. The tower received its 250 millionth visitor in 2010. The tower stands 324 meters (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-story building. During its construction, the Eiffel Tower surpassed the Washington Monument to assume the title of the tallest man-made structure in the world, a title it held for 41 years, until the Chrysler Building in New York City was built in 1930. Because of the addition of the antenna atop the Eiffel Tower in 1957, it is now taller than the Chrysler Building by 17 feet (5.2 m). Not including broadcast antennas, it is the second-tallest structure in France, after the Millau Viaduct.


Attempted relocation

According to interviews, Montreal Mayor Jean Drapeau negotiated a secret agreement with French President Charles de Gaulle for the tower to be dismantled and temporarily relocated to Montreal to serve as a landmark and tourist attraction during Expo 67 . The plan was allegedly vetoed by the company which operated the tower out of fear that the French government could refuse permission for the tower to be restored to its original location