Brad Crist

What part of the plant do you use?

Ginger actually comes from the root. So if you love the spicy taste of ginger hopefully eating from something off of a root doesn't bother you too much.

Giant Ginger Cookies

  • Prep time: 20 minutes
  • Cook time: 13 minutes
  • Cooling time: 16 minutes
  • Yield: Makes two dozen 4-inch cookies


  • 4-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 4 teaspoons ground ginger*
  • 2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon*
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves*
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1-1/2 cups butter (3 sticks), room temperature
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup molasses
  • 3/4 cup coarse sugar or granulated sugar

* Can substitute the ground ginger, cinnamon, and cloves for an equal amount of pumpkin pie spice.


1 In a medium mixing bowl stir together flour, ground ginger, baking soda, ground cinnamon, ground cloves, and salt; set aside.

2 In a large mixing bowl beat together butter with the 2 cups granulated sugar. Beat until combined, scraping sides of bowl occasionally. Beat in eggs and molasses. Beat in the flour mixture, using a wooden spoon.

3 Shape dough into 2-inch balls using 1/4 cup dough. Roll balls in the 3/4 cup coarse or granulated sugar. Place about 2-1/2 inches apart on an un-greased cookie sheet.

4 Bake in a 350°F oven for 12 to 14 minutes or until cookies are light brown and puffed. Cool on cookie sheet for 2 minutes. Transfer cookies to a wire rack to cool. Store in a tightly covered container at room temperature for up to 3 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Health Benefits of Ginger

Ginger has a long history of use for relieving digestive problems such as nausea, loss of appetite, motion sickness and pain.

Interesting Facts

  • Ginger was used in ancient times as a food preservative and to help treat digestive problems. To treat digestive problems, Greeks would eat ginger wrapped in bread. Eventually ginger was added to the bread dough creating that wonderful treat many around the globe love today gingerbread
  • Ginger ale eventually stemmed from a ginger beer made by the English and Colonial America as a remedy for diarrhea, nausea and vomiting.
Big image