Cardinals Baseball

St. Louis Cardinals MLB

The St. Louis Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals are a professional baseball team based in St. Louis, Missouri, who play at Busch Stadium, located at 700 Clark Avenue. They are members of the Central Division in the National League of Major League Baseball. The Cardinals were founded in the American Association in 1882 as the St. Louis Brown Stockings, taking the name from an earlier National League team. They joined the National League in 1892, changed their names to the "Perfectos" in 1899 and took Cardinals as their official name in 1900.

The Cardinals have won 11 World Series, the most of any National League team, and second overall only to the New York Yankees with 27. Their 18 NL pennants tie them with the Dodgers for second most among NL clubs (behind only the Giants) and third overall to the Yankees' 40 appearances. Their success has been attributed in part to timely trades over the years, their willingness to take conservative spending risks, and the creation of the Minor League system in the 1920s by Branch Rickey. Thirty-nine Cardinals have been selected to the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame, including Stan Musial, Bob Gibson, Lou Brock, Rogers Hornsby, Dizzy Dean, Ozzie Smith,Whitey Herzog, Bruce Sutter, Red Schoendienst, Joe Medwick, and Branch Rickey. The Cardinals have a well-known long-standing rivalry with the Chicago Cubs.

2011 World Series v.s Tx Rangers

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2011 World Series Champion St. Louis Cardinals Season Highlight Reel (Dark Horses)

Game two 2012 world series win

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Springfield Cardinals Baseball

The Home Run Pro

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St. Louis Cardinals 2011 - Cardinal Nation

Chris Carpenter-Pitcher

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Jon Jay- Center Field

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Pitching

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Sliding

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Batting

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Scoreing

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Catching the Ball

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The Home Run Pro

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Game Mode

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Fans

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Wins

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Butch Statium

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World Series 2011

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Ozzie Smith 1982

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George Hendrick 1983

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"MLB 11 The Show" Gameplay Video - Red Sox @ Cardinals - World Series Game 3
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2011 world series- The Exitment

Some Nights You Win the World Series 2011
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World Series Records

I-70 World Series (1985)

In 1985 the Cardinals were the NL's most dominant team, winning 101 games behind the MVP performance of center fielder Willie McGee, pitcher John Tudor's 21 wins and 10 shutouts, and rookie left fielder Vince Coleman's 110 stolen bases. After defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in the NLCS, Herzog's Cardinals reached the 1985 World Series to face the Kansas City Royals. The series was nicknamed the "I-70 Series" after the highway that connects the two in-state rivals.

The Royals won in seven games, but the series is best remembered by Cardinals fans for an infamous blown call by umpire Don Denkinger in Game 6. In the 9th inning, the Cardinals, who had a 3 games to 2 advantage over the Royals, were leading 1–0 and three outs away from winning the Series when Denkinger's blown call on a play at first base sparked a Kansas City rally. The Royals won the game by a score of 2–1, and went on to defeat the Cardinals in the seventh and deciding game.

[edit]World Series Loss to the Minnesota Twins (1987)

In Cardinals, Herzog made McGee his number five hitter, and he responded well to this unconventional choice, driving in 105 runs despite hitting only 11 home runs. The Cardinals reached the 1987 World Series, losing to the Minnesota Twins in seven games. The Cardinals, who had been decimated by injuries to key players, including Jack Clark and Terry Pendleton, had a difficult time keeping up with the high-powered Twins offense.[12] The series against the Twins was noteworthy as being the first in which the home team won every game (which happened again 4 years later when the Twins defeated the Atlanta Braves). It also featured the only World Series where a pitcher started Games One and Seven, but none of the others in between — that pitcher was rookie Joe Magrane.

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World Series Continued

(1996–2011)

Mark McGwire broke the single-season home run record while playing with St. Louis in 1998.

Before the 1996 season Anheuser-Busch sold the Cardinals to an investment group led byWilliam DeWitt, Jr., who hired Tony La Russa away from the Oakland Athletics. St. Louis won the NL Central that season for their only division title of the decade and defeated thePadres in the NLDS before falling to the Atlanta Braves in 7 games in the NLCS. Some former Athletics followed La Russa to St. Louis, including Mark McGwire and Dennis Eckersley. McGwire was acquired in a trade midway through the 1997 season. Willie McGee returned in 1996 after also playing in Oakland while La Russa was there. In 1998, theCardinals were the focus of the baseball world as McGwire broke the single season home run record by hitting 70 home runs. McGwire's epic pursuit of Roger Maris' record along with the Cubs' Sammy Sosa helped to re-popularize baseball after the 1994 strike.[12]

[edit]El Hombre Brings Consistency to St. Louis and the Cardinals Keep Winning (2000–2011)

Shortly before the 2000 season the Cardinals traded for Gold Glove center fielder Jim Edmonds from the California Angels. Despite McGwire going down with a season-ending injury, Edmonds helped to lead the Cardinals to the playoffs for the first time since 1996. To replace McGwire's offense, the Cardinals brought in Will Clark from the Orioles, and he responded by batting .345 with 12 home runs and a .655 slugging percentage for the Cardinals. He retired when the Cardinals playoff run ended. They would lose to the New York Mets 4–1 in the NLCS playoffs but would return to postseason play the following year with the help of 2001 Rookie of the Year Albert Pujols. McGwire again was sidelined by a season-ending knee injury in 2001, but this one was also career-ending at age 37.

David Freeze

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World Series Continued

2002–2006)

Pujols went on to have arguably the best first 11 years in the history of the game, marked by an unprecedented level of production. He became the first player in major league history with a batting average no lower than .299, and at least 32 home runs 99 runs scored and 99 RBIs every year for the first 11 seasons of his career. Nicknamed 'El Hombre' in honor of Stan 'The Man' Musial for his reminiscence of the latter's high hitting productivity as well as his even temperament, Pujols was the cornerstone of the Cardinals lineup for those eleven seasons.

Alongside Edmonds and third baseman Scott Rolen (acquired via trade from the Philadelphia Phillies in 2002), the Cardinals had three of the best hitters in the National League who were all highly regarded defensive players in their own right. In the careers, they won a combined total of 18 Gold Gloves and 8 Silver Slugger awards. St. Louis reached the playoffs in six of the next seven years: 2000,2001, and 2002, then missed in 2003 before advancing to the NLCS in each of the next three years, punctuated by two trips to the World Series in 2004 and 2006.

[edit]Hitting on All Cylinders (2004)

2004 was arguably the finest offensive output from the trio of Rolen, Edmonds and Pujols while together, powering the Cardinals to a Major League-best 105 regular season wins, and one of the finest in team history. They each finished with no less than 34 home runs, 102 runs scored, 111 RBIs and .301 batting average and were also third, fourth and fifth in the MVP voting. Their production, augmented by solid contributions from players like Reggie Sanders, Tony Womack, and John Mabry, allowed the Cardinals to lead the NL with 855 runs scored in 2004.

Before the 2003 season, the Cardinals signed former top prospect Chris Carpenter after several years with the Toronto Blue Jays. He did not actually pitch for the major league club until 2004, but the team became the beneficiary of Carpenter's new-found success that had eluded him with Toronto: he posted then-career bests of 15 wins and a 3.22 ERA. This would only be the beginning of a run of several seasons as one of the NL's best starters. Helping to anchor a staff led by Matt Morris and Jason Marquis, the Cardinals were second in the NL in ERA at 3.75.

In the playoffs, the Cardinals defeated the Dodgers in the NLDS and the Houston Astros in a seven-game NLCS to reach the 2004 World Series. However, they faced a Boston Red Sox who had just taken four straight from the Yankees after having been down 0–3 in the ALCS, which had only happened twice before in North American professional sports, only in the NHL. (The 1942 Toronto Maple Leafs won the Stanley Cup against the Detroit Red Wings after dropping the first three games. In 1975, the New York Islanders rallied from an 0-3 deficit to defeat the Pittsburgh Penguins. The 2010 Philadelphia Flyers also managed the feat, knocking off the Boston Bruins.) Not skipping a beat, the Red Sox swept the Cardinals for their first World Series title in 86 years, capping their postseason by ending with 8 straight wins. The Cardinals lost only 4 times in a shutout in the regular season, but were shut out 3 times in the postseason, including 1 shutout loss in every series in the playoffs (4–0 to the Dodgers in Game 3 of the NLDS, 3–0 to the Astros in Game 5 of the NLCS, and 3–0 to the Red Sox in Game 4 of the World Series).

[edit]Another Division Title (2005)

The Cardinals won 100 games and another Central Division title in 2005, but lost in an NLCS rematch to the Astros. This was also the final season for the second incarnation of Busch Memorial Stadium. Pujols won his first MVP awards with the Cardinals. Meanwhile, Carpenter became the franchise's first Cy Young award winner since Bob Gibson.

CARDINALS COMMERCIALLS

Old Guy Batter

St. Louis Cardinals - "Fungo" Commercial (Red Shoendienst)

The Powdered Doughnut

St. Louis Cardinals - "Rosin" Commercial

Cardinals version of Bingo

2012 St. Louis Cardinals TV Commercial - Bingo

All the Gloves

2012 St. Louis Cardinals TV Commercial - Gloves

Bird Call

2012 St. Louis Cardinals TV Commercial - Bird call

Bird Dance

2012 St. Louis Cardinals TV Commercial - Scarecrow
Saddest Little St Louis Cardinals Fan Ever