Meet Ms. Sal

What I believe

Responsibility

I believe that each of us should own our decisions, obligations, and actions. When we show others that we take responsibility for these things, we earn trust and respect. It is difficult to respect a person who does not do their part, blames others for their choices, or lies about their actions.


I hold myself to a high level of responsibility for ensuring that I do my part in the educative process: providing a safe and effective learning environment, using logical and fair procedures and policies, and communicating expectations and grade feedback in a timely manner. That does not mean I will never make mistakes (I will make plenty!), just that I will own up to it when I do. I also expect the same of my students.

Authenticity

I believe in being a real person, and a realistic person. Relating to others in an empathetic, caring, and compassionate manner requires that a person be authentic and honest about their strengths, weaknesses, flaws, mistakes and victories, as well as their priority choices. Being authentic means not pretending perfection or abject failure.


In reality, we are all a work in progress. No one is good at everything, and everyone is learning something. We all have moments we fail, in our goals and in our personal character. We cannot do everything, and must prioritize our time and actions. It is perfectly alright to say, "This is important, but I had to choose between x and y, and I chose y," as long as one is ready to accept the consequence of that choice.


I will be honest with you about these things, as much as I can given my position and responsibilities. I will also understand and accept you as you are, and make every effort to understand your choices, even as I must at times be the person establishing the consequences. We are all human.

Integrity

“Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.” -Unknown


Walking in integrity means having a reputation for honesty, fairness, and high character. There are several opportunities for each of us to cheat, break the rules, do an extra favor to certain people for our own benefit, or pretend we did not make a mistake. A person with integrity is still tempted to do these things, but chooses consistently to make the honest, fair, and right thing--even when it hurts. People with integrity are people who can be trusted.


This is the most important part of my character, to me, and also the hardest (see authentic, above). But, I take it very seriously, so my family, my coworkers, and my students never have to wonder if I am manipulating them, cheating them, lying to them, or favoring them. "Favoring" is another way of cheating someone: it deprives them of the opportunity to own their own success. It is important that each of you know your value, and that should be dependent on your own choices, your own work, and your own character, not mine.