Suicide and Depression

By: Emma Smith

Depression and Self-harm

Major Depressive Disorder affects 14.8 million American adults today, and that is 6.7% of the United States population. Looking at these numbers, it's probable that someone you know or love is suffering from depression. Depression is a serious disorder, as 50% of all suicide victims have or did suffer from depression. Depression is more than just feeling sad, down, or like your world is falling apart. It's much, much more than that, and should not be taken lightly. If you think you are suffering from depression, talk to your doctor. Warning signs of depression that you may start to notice are changes in sleeping habits, loss of interest in daily activities, feeling angry or irritated all the time, loss of energy, and even unexplained aches throughout the body. Depression does not just effect the mind, it effects the body as well.

Depression also may cause self-harm. Self harm is extremely serious, and if you notice anyone that might be suffering from it, talk to someone you trust about it immediately. Forms of self-harm aren't just cutting, it's also burning or branding yourself, carving into your skin, hitting or punching self, biting, hand banging on other things, pulling hair, and even picking at wounds so they cannot heal correctly. Signs of self-harm or self-injury are: Scars or burns on flesh unexplained, claiming to have frequent accidents, fresh cuts/scratches/bruises, wearing long sleeves and pants in hot weather, sharp objects with them or in their home, depression, spending a lot of time alone, ect. And the effects of this are equally as terrible as doing the thing itself such as permanent scars, disfigurations, social isolation, worsening depression- which may result in suicide -, infections, stress, anxiety, and even death.

Suicide

34,000 people die from suicide each year. That's nearly twice as much as victims of homicide. With those numbers, someone around the word commits suicide every fifteen minutes. No one in their right mind would want someone they loved and cared for to commit suicide. You might be lucky and see it coming, but it might be completely subtle. It just depends on how good the person is at hiding things. Warning signs of suicide that you can use to help you identify a situation are Talking about wanting to die or to kill oneself. Looking for a way to kill oneself, such as searching online or buying a gun, Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live, talking about wanting to die or to kill oneself. Looking for a way to kill oneself, such as searching online or buying a gun, Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live, Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain, Talking about being a burden to others, Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs, Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly, Sleeping too little or too much, Withdrawn or feeling isolated, Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge. Displaying extreme mood swings, or even becoming calmer.

Help

If you or a loved one are experiencing suicidal thoughts, please take a look at the resources below.


1 (800) 273-8255

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline


www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org


https://www.afsp.org/


Use these links and the phone number above, or talk to a trusted adult, friend, or family member about counseling.