Magnetism and Electromagnetictism

Featuring: Faraday & Tesla • Nick Marietta & Katie Blanks

Electromagnetic Induction

A changing magnetic field causes a potential difference (voltage) in a conductor. This concept is called Electromagnetic Induction. Electromagnetic Induction is the principle used in electric generators (also called alternators), microphones, electric guitars, transformers, and Tesla coils. The current created in this conductor is alternating current because it flows back and forth. This is a result of the conductor being raised then lowered in to a magnetic field.

Michael Faraday

Michael Faraday was a brilliant scientist of the nineteenth century whose goal was to understand the basic principles of electricity.

If Electricity can create Magnetism...

Faraday developed this theory when he "wrapped lines of magnetic force around a wire carrying an electric current.He then constructed a model in which a suspended magnet moved in a circle around a fixed wire carrying a current, each pushed by a magnetic field." (McVeigh,D) These discoveries lead to the concept that electricity and magnetism could create each other, a basic principle behind the dynamo (electric generator).

http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/projects/bluetelephone/html/faraday.html

Nikola Tesla

Tesla focused mainly on combining the principles of physics and electricity. By using the fundamentals of physics Tesla discovered the rotating magnetic field by invisioning an iron rotor spinning rapidly in a rotating magnetic field produced by the interaction of two alternating currents out of step with each other.

Works Cited

"Magnetism: Real Life Applications."Science Clarified. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Mar. 2013. <http://www.scienceclarified.com/everyday/Real-Life-Physics-Vol-3-Biology-Vol- 1/Magnetism-Real-life-applications.html>.


McVeigh, Daniel P. "Michael Faraday." Michael Faraday. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Mar. 2013. <http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/projects/bluetelephone/html/faraday.html>.


Wagon, Joy. "Electromagnetic Induction." Electromagnetic Induction. Science Joy Wagon, 1998. Web. 26 Mar. 2013.

<http://www.regentsprep.org/Regents/physics/phys03/dinduction/>.